Thursday, March 26, 2020

TheList 5251 TGB



 
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The List 5251

Good Thursday Morning to all.

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Today in Naval History

This Day In Naval History – March 25, 2019

1942

During World War II, Adm. Ernest J. King becomes Chief of Naval Operations and also Commander, U.S. Fleet, holding both positions through the rest of the war, guiding the Navy's plans and global operations.

1942

Task Force 39, commanded by Rear Adm. John W. Wilcox, Jr., sails from Portland, Maine, for Scapa Flow, Orkeny Islands, Scotland, to reinforce the British Home Fleet due the British Fleets involvement in Operation Ironclad, the British invasion of the Vichy French controlled Madagascar. The following day, Rear Adm. Wilcox, while taking an unaccompanied walk on his flagship, USS Washington (BB 56), is washed overboard and disappears in the heavy seas.

1943

During the Battle of Komandorski Islands, Task Group 16.6, commanded by Rear Adm. Charles H. McMorris, prevents Japanese reinforcements from reaching Kiska, Aleutian Islands. USS Salt Lake City (CA 25) is damaged by gunfire from Japanese heavy cruisers, but damages one with return fire.

1945

USS Halligan (DD 584) is sunk by a mine off Okinawa. Also on this date, USS Balao (SS-285) sinks Japanese army stores ship No.1 Shinto Maru.

Thanks to CHINFO

Executive Summary:

• Multiple outlets report that five more sailors aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for COVID-19 while the San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the crew of USS Somerset have been confined to the ship due to a spike in COVID-19 cases amongst San Diego-based sailors.

• USNI News reports that the Navy has postponed the Large Scale Exercise 2020.

• Reuters reports that USS McCampbell transited the Taiwan Strait on March 25.

Today in World History March 26

1517

The famous Flemish composer Heinrich Issac dies.

1799

Napoleon Bonaparte captures Jaffa, Palestine.

1804

Congress orders the removal of Indians east of the Mississippi River to Louisiana.

1804

The territory of New Orleans is organized in the Louisiana Purchase.

1827

German composer Ludwig Van Beethoven dies in Vienna. He had been deaf for the later part of his life, but said on his death bed "I shall hear in heaven."

1832 

Famed western artist George Catlin begins his voyage up the Missouri River aboard the American Fur Company steamship Yellowstone.

1885

Eastman Film Co. manufactures the first commercial motion picture film.

1913

The Balkan allies take Adrianople.

1918

On the Western Front, the Germans take the French towns Noyon, Roye and Lihons.

1938

Hermann Goering warns all Jews to leave Austria.

1942

The Germans begin sending Jews to Auschwitz in Poland.

1950

Senator Joe McCarthy names Owen Lattimore, an ex-State Department adviser, as a Soviet spy.

1951

The United States Air Force flag design is approved.

1953

Eisenhower offers increased aid to the French fighting in Indochina.

1953

Dr. Jonas Salk announces a new vaccine against polio.

1954

The United States sets off an H-bomb blast in the Marshall Islands, the second in four weeks.

1961

John F. Kennedy meets with British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan in Washington to discuss increased Communist involvement in Laos.

1969

The Soviet weather Satellite Meteor 1 is launched.

1969

Writer John Kennedy Toole commits suicide at the age of 32. His mother helps get his first and only novel, A Confederacy of Dunces, published. It goes on to win the 1981 Pulitzer Prize.

1979

The Camp David treaty is signed between Israel and Egypt.

1982

Ground is broken in Washington D.C. for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

1989

The first free elections take place in the Soviet Union. Boris Yeltsin is elected.

1992

An Indianapolis court finds heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson guilty of rape.
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Thanks to Glen

here's an article that THE LIST might enjoy reading.
Glenn

Air Force PJs

When Navy SEALS Call 9-1-1: Inside the Special Ops Force That Shows Up

When Navy SEALS Call 9-1-1: Inside the Special Ops Force That Shows Up

This is the story of the military's "guardian angels"—and the mission of a lifetime.
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Thanks to Mud

Dustin Hoffman, the flea

This one goes back about 30 or 40 years, but it's still very funny.

https://eur05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DMMNB9wOtBAg&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf5d14c6929004977b61c08d7cbffe2fd%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637202172192944786&sdata=SvpwuASuvWPCyJzQE8Gro%2BSv7at0wd%2Bh5I0wuHl5MsA%3D&reserved=
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From the List archives

From: "Joe Tranchini"
Subject: 3/26/1945 : Iwo Jima

Lest we forget...

From: Steve

On March 26th,1945, Iwo Jima was declared "secured." The Marines handed the island over to the Army so the Army Air Corps could use the air fields. Then many of the Marines sailed off to another conflict on Okinawa.

February 19th was the start of the invasion of Iwo. For the Marines and sailors who assaulted Iwo, every one of the 36 continuous days of that battle seemed nearly that long.

About 77,000 US Marines from the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Marine Divisions converged on tiny Iwo Jima in late February. LtGen Tadamichi Kuribayashi had fortified Iwo Jima for a full year before the invasion, and had an estimated 22,000 troops dug in under the island. US forces began bombing Iwo in June 1944, 8 full months before the invasion. Naval bombardments then shelled the island mercilessly around the clock for four consecutive days prior to the invasion.

Iwo set a number of "firsts":

It was the longest concentrated bombardment of any target in the history of mankind up to that date.

It was the largest total tonnage of bombs and artillery ever delivered on a single target to that date.

It was the largest armada of ships ever assembled for an invasion up to that date (about 700 ships).

It was the largest number of invaders to ever invade any island up to that date (each of those new records was broken by the invasion of Okinawa in April 1945).

It was the first (and last) time Seabees accompanied Marines in the first waves of a beach invasion (they swore they'd never do THAT again!).

It was the first and last time any Marine unit landed on D-Day and served an entire campaign without being relieved by another unit.

And it was the only time in Marine Corps history when the number of invading casualties exceeded the number of defending casualties. More than 19,000 Marines were wounded on Iwo, and 6,821 died there. As such, it remains the costliest battle in Marine Corps history.

One-third of all Marines killed during WWII died on Iwo Jima.

All but about 200 Japanese defenders died on Iwo.

Marine LtGen Harry Schmidt and LtGen H. M. Smith led Task Force 56. It made up V Corps, composed of the 3rd MarDiv (MGen Erskine), 4th MarDiv (MGen Clifton Cates), and 5th MarDiv (MGen Rockey). The 5th Division had been formed expressly for the battle of Iwo Jima. It was disbanded following the battle.

Among the participants were names of distinction:
· Son of the sitting Commandant LtCol AA Vandergriff Jr (3/24)
· Future Commandant 1stLt Robert E Cushman, Jr (2/9)
· Future Commandant Clifton Cates (CG 4thMarDiv)
· Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal
· LtGen "Howlin' Mad" Smith
· And the first enlisted Marine Medal of Honor recipient of WWII, "Manila John" Basilone. Basilone had received his MOH from Chesty Puller for action on Guadalcanal. He was KIA on Iwo.

The invasion planners felt confident the battle would take 7-10 days. It took 36. LtGen Kuribayashi's body has never been found.

The final two Japanese defenders surrendered 4 years after the battle. In January of 1949, two Japanese soldiers surrendered themselves to the occupying US Army garrison on Iwo. They had hidden in the 11 miles of tunnels and bunkers under Iwo, successfully raiding the Army supplies for food and water at night.

They had found a Stars and Stripes newspaper which showed pictures of GIs celebrating New Year's Eve in downtown Tokyo, 1948-49, and knew Japan had lost the war.

They reported in full uniforms, well fed, and surrendered clean, fully-functional weapons.

Iwo Jima stands as an icon for every Marine who has earned the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor since 1945. The men who fought there are true heroes to our nation and our Corps. We can never thank them enough for what they went through for us on that small patch of hell. I've stopped often today and thought about them.

THANK YOU, Marines. Because of what you did, I grew up a safe, healthy kid in comfort and freedom speaking English instead of Japanese.

Semper Fidelis.
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Thanks to Mike

32 Strange Things to get your mind off politics....


1. A rat can last longer without water than a camel.


2. Your stomach has to produce a new layer of mucus every two weeks or it will digest itself.

3. The dot over the letter "i" is called a tittle.

4. A raisin dropped in a glass of fresh champagne will bounce up and down continuously from the bottom of the glass to the top.

5. A female ferret will die if it goes into heat and cannot find a mate.

6. A duck's quack doesn't echo. No one knows why.

7. A 2 X 4 is really 1-1/2" by 3-1/2".

8. During the chariot scene in "Ben Hur," a small red car can be seen in the distance (and Heston's wearing a watch).

9. On average, 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents daily!
(That explains a few mysteries... .)

10. Donald Duck comics were banned from Finland because he doesn't wear pants.

11. Because metal was scarce, the Oscars given out during World War II were made of wood

12. The number of possible ways of playing the first four moves per side in a game of chess is 318,979,564, 000.

13. There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple and silver.

14 The name Wendy was made up for the book Peter Pan. There was never a recorded Wendy before.

15. The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin in World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

16. If one places a tiny amount of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death. (Who was the sadist who discovered this??)

17. Bruce Lee was so fast that they actually had to s-l-o-w film down so you could see his moves. That's the opposite of the norm.

18. The first CD pressed in the US was Bruce Springsteen' s "Born in the USA."

19. The original name for butterfly was flutterby.

20. The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.

21. The first product Motorola started to develop was a record player for automobiles. At that time, the most known player on the market was Victrola, so they called themselves Motorola.

22. Roses may be red, but violets are indeed violet.

23. By raising your legs slowly and lying on your back, you cannot sink into quicksand.

24. Celery has negative calories. It takes more calories to eat a piece of celery than the celery has in it to begin with. One of my favorites and there are foods like this

25. Charlie Chaplin once won third prize in a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest.

26. Chewing gum while peeling onions will keep you from crying.

27. Sherlock Holmes NEVER said, "Elementary, my dear Watson."

28. An old law in Bellingham, Washington, made it illegal for a woman to take more than three steps backwards while dancing!

29. The glue on Israeli postage is certified kosher.

30. The Guinness Book of Records holds the record for being the book most often stolen from public libraries.

31. Astronauts are not allowed to eat beans before they go into space because passing wind in a spacesuit damages them.

32. Bats always turn left when exiting a cave!

SEE.....NOW WASN'T THAT CALMING AND NICE FOR A CHANGE?.....

.......Not to mention how much smarter you've now become!
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A good one from the archives

Thanks to Micro

MIME THROUGH TIME | SketchSHE

This is a hoot !

Very well done 3-min clip!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMpQUsQcJFg&feature=youtu.be
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Magic Moments

Thanks to Carol, via Helen and Dutch

You may have seen this before but it is just what you may need to brighten you day again. Enjoy ! Carol

http://assets.evie.com/asset/cc1afc44ee3cdaac9ae2f354f834dd30d7aa343e/video_inline_h540
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I wish all the kids out there would - please - read this - Dutch 

thanks to Doctor Rich

Thanks to Bob …. (a little useful retrospection is in order….)

I talked with a man today, an 80+ year old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Coronavirus scare was gripping America.

He simply smiled, looked away and said:

"Let me tell you what I need! I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for... I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children...

I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies...that they respect what they've been given...that they've earned what others sacrificed for."

I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing.

"You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today.

And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family...fathers, sons, uncles...

Having someone, you love, sent off to war...it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battle front news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death.

And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America.

And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today."

He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued:

"Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think a sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms who's husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush the store, buying everything they can...no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made.

So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your tv?"

I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own...now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear.

I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten. We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them..learn from them...to respect them.
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Please see attachment for the world news from Military Periscope

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