Thursday, October 24, 2019

TheList 5125


The List 5125 TGB


To All,

I hope that you all had a great weekend

Regards,

Skip

Today in Naval History

October 21

1797 The frigate Constitution launches at Edmund Hartt's Shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy.

1862 The Cairo class ironclad river gunboat Louisville, under the command of Lt. Cmdr. R.W. Meade III, escorts the steamer Meteor, whose embarked Army troops landed at Bledsoes Landing and Hamblins Landing, Ark. The towns are burned in reprisal for attacks by Confederate guerrillas on mail steamer Gladiator early in the morning of Oct. 19.

1864 The wooden side-wheel cruiser Fort Jackson captures steamer Wando at sea, east of Cape Romain, S.C., with cargo of cotton.

1942 The British submarine HMS Seraph lands Navy Capt. Jerauld Wright and four Army officers including Maj. Gen. Mark Clark at Cherchel, French North Africa to meet with a French military delegation to assess French attitude towards future Allied landings (Operation Torch). Eventually, the French agreed to the mission.

1942 USS Guardfish (SS 217) sinks Japanese freighter Nichiho Maru about 120 miles north-northeast of Formosa while USS Gudgeon (SS 211) attacks a Japanese convoy in the Bismarck Sea and sinks the transport Choko Maru.

1952 USS Lewis (DE 535) aids two Korean minesweepers under fire at Wonson Harbor. As she approaches, at least four enemy batteries open up on the destroyer escort. Lewis returns fire and lays down a smoke screen to cover the minesweepers retreat. Shortly thereafter the destroyer escort takes two 75mm shell hits, killing six crewmen outright and mortally wounding a seventh. The second hit explodes on the main deck, port side, lightly wounding one sailor.

1989 Los Angeles-class submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) is commissioned at Groton, CT

1995 USS Stethem (DDG 63) is commissioned at Port Hueneme, Calif., and named in honor of Bronze Star and Purple Heart recipient, Robert Dean Stethem. She is the 13th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the U.S. Navy.

2017 Expeditionary Sea Base USNS Hershel "Woody" Williams (ESB 4) is put into service during a christening ceremony at General Dynamics NASSCO, San Diego.



Thanks to CHINFO

Executive Summary:

• During a visit to Italy on Friday, CNO Adm. Mike Gilday stressed the importance of timely ship maintenance and training, reports Stars and Stripes.

• The Wall Street Journal reports that Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Speaker Nancy Pelosi separately traveled to Afghanistan to allay concerns of a U.S. troop withdrawal, as Kurdish-led forces withdrew from a border town in northeastern Syria, fulfilling part of the cease-fire agreement between Turkey.

• Singapore enhanced defense ties with China, reports the Straits Times.

• Sailors and Marines are strengthening Blue-Green ties during COMPTUEX aboard USS Bataan ARG reports Defense Aerospace Report.





Today in History: October 21

1096 Seljuk Turks at Chivitot slaughter thousands of German crusaders.

1529 The Pope names Henry VIII of England Defender of the Faith after defending the seven sacraments against Luther.



1600 Tokugawa Ieyasu defeats his enemies in battle and affirms his position as Japan's most powerful warlord.



1790 The Tricolor is chosen as the official flag of France.



1805 Vice Admiral and Viscount Horatio Nelson wins his greatest victory over a Franco-Spanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar, fought off Cape Trafalgar, Spain. Nelson is fatally wounded in the battle, but lives long enough to see victory.



1837 Under a flag of truce during peace talks, U.S. troops siege the Indian Seminole Chief Osceola in Florida.



1861 The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Va. begins, a disastrous Union defeat which sparks Congressional investigations.



1867 Many leaders of the Kiowa, Comanche and Kiowa-Apache sign a peace treaty at Medicine Lodge, Kan. Comanche Chief Quanah Parker refused to accept the treaty terms.



1872 The U.S. Naval Academy admits John H. Conyers, the first African American to be accepted.



1879 After 14 months of testing, Thomas Edison first demonstrates his electric lamp, hoping to one day compete with gaslight.



1904 Panamanians clash with U.S. Marines in Panama in a brief uprising.



1917 The first U.S. troops enter the front lines at Sommerviller under French command.



1939 As war heats up with Germany, the British war cabinet holds its first meeting in the underground war room in London.



1940 Ernest Hemingway's novel For Whom the Bell Tolls is published.



1942 Eight American and British officers land from a submarine on an Algerian beach to take measure of Vichy French to the Operation Torch landings.



1950 North Korean Premier Kim Il-Sung establishes a new capital at Sinuiju on the Yalu River opposite the Chinese City of Antung.



1959 The Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opens in Manhattan.



1961 Bob Dylan records his first album in a single day at a cost of $400.



1967 The "March on the Pentagon," protesting American involvement in Vietnam , draws 50,000 protesters.



1969 Israel's Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan resigns over disagreements with Prime Minister Menachem Begin over policies related to the Palestinians.



1983 The United States sends a ten-ship task force to Grenada.



1994 North Korea and the US sign an agreement requiring North Korea to halts its nuclear weapons program and agree to international inspections.










19th Century


1805


Battle of Trafalgar »






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Thanks to THE Bear -



COMMANDO HUNT and ROLLING THUNDER REMEMBERED… WEEK THIRTY-EIGHT of the HUNT… 28 JULY TO 3 AUGUST 1969…

October 20, 2019Bear Taylor

COMMEMORATING THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE VIETNAM WAR (1961-1973)…

LAST WE FORGET… The New York Times, Friday, 1 August 1969. Page 1: Dateline, Saigon, July 31… "U.S. WAR DEAD 110 IN WEEK IS 1969 LOW–Foe's Casualties Also Drop Reflecting Vietnam Lull"… "United States combat deaths dropped to 110 last week, the lowest weekly toll this year and the fourth lowest in two years… North Vietnamese and Vietcong casualties in the week ended last Saturday (26 July) were also the year's lowest at 1,963 killed. The statistics for the period preceding President Nixon's visit to the war zone reflected the continuing lull that began June 20 in the ground fighting. However, 290 South Vietnamese soldiers were killed…underlining the increased share in combat being taken by Government forces….1,056 Americans were wounded, 468 seriously enough for hospital treatment…."… English philosopher G.K. CHESTERTON: "The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him."….

GOOD MORNING. It is Monday, 21 October 2019. Humble Host recalls a week of the Vietnam War and the Thirty-Eighth week of COMMANDO HUNT, the unrelenting air interdiction campaign to hunt-and-kill North Vietnamese activities on the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos…



I. HEAD LINES FROM The NEW YORK TIMES for 28 July through 3 August 1969…

A. THE WAR… (28 July) TEN DIE IN VIETNAM AS RESCUE COPTER IS DOWN–SEVEN CIVILIANS KILLED–B-52 CRASHES IN GUAM, SIX DIE… "A United States Marine helicopter carrying a wounded North Vietnamese prisoner from the battlefield to a hospital was shot down yesterday by enemy gunners. All nine Americans aboard and the prisoner were killed. The area is one of thick jungle undergrowth long held by North Vietnamese regulars and Vietcong guerrillas. The Queson Valley has been the scene of frequent heavy fighting in the past. The CH-46 was the 1,252nd American helicopter reported shot down and destroyed by enemy gunners during the war… American infantrymen sweeping northeast of Saigon reported having killed 19 enemy soldiers today in a three-hour fight…Marines killed five enemy soldiers 20 miles south of Danang."… GUERRILLAS ATTACK U.S. AIR BASE AT UBON IN THAILAND… (29 July) NIXON ASSERTS U.S. WILL STAND WITH THAIS AGAINST ALL FOES–Remark In Bangkok Taken As Attempt To Reassure An Apprehensive Ally–Promise Not Specific–Aide Denies That President Contradicted His Plan For Disengagement… FIGHTING ERUPTS NORTH OF SAIGON–53 Enemy Dead in Largest Battle Since 'Lull' Began… (30 July) NIXON REPORTED VISITING VIETNAM–Due To See Thieu–Leaves Thailand–Bunker And Abrams On Plane–President To Talk With Troops At Bien Hoa… G.I.'s JOIN BATTLE WEST OF SAIGON–Arrive By Copter To Bolster Allies In All-Day Clash… "…reinforce South Vietnamese irregulars near the Cambodian border, and the joint force reported having killed 63 North Vietnamese soldiers in all-day battle."... (31 July) VIETNAM WAR LULL ENTERS 7th WEEK… "The summer lull in the Vietnam war entered its seventh week today, one of the quietest days since it began… Prior to President Nixon's arrival here today, about 750 United States troops left Vietnam as part of his plan to cut United States strength by the end of August…. They are bound for Hawaii."… (2 August) U.S. SAID TO TEST ENEMY BY LIMITING BIG ATTACKS… "There are indications that the United States is testing the enemy's willingness to scale down the Vietnam war gradually by reducing its own offensive operations during the current battlefield lull. Defense Department officials assert that the reduction in American offensive sweeps in Vietnam is a response to the slackening of the enemy's attacks. But the officials acknowledge that they are interested in seeing whether, as a result of the modest American tactics now, the enemy is willing to prolong the battlefield lull. "… (3 August) U.S. PLANES ATTACK FOE IN BUFFER ZONE… "United States warplanes and artillery bombarded North Vietnamese troops and rocket launching sites in the demilitarized zone twice yesterday… 76 enemy soldiers were killed in other small skirmishes across the country…"…



B. PARIS PEACE TALKS… (28 July) AN INFORMAL TRUCE SEEN BY SENATOR MIKE MANSFIELD… "…said today that the lack of progress in the Paris peace talks could mean that fighting in South Vietnam would fade away without any formal agreement to end the war. In an interview the Senate Democrat leader accused North Vietnam of being intransigent and that there might never be a negotiated cease-fire. He said he was certain that if there had been any real progress in the Paris talks it would have been reported to Congressional leaders and that he had received no such reports. In another comment, former Secretary of State Dean Rusk said today that he doubted that any Asian policy of the Nixon Administration would differ greatly from that of former President Lyndon B. Johnson if United States interests were to be served."… (30 July) DREW MIDDLETON… BEHIND THE PARIS PEACE TALKS–Only Events Far From The Conference Can Provide The Impulse For Progress… "The Vietnam peace talks appear to be going from 'dead slow' to 'dead stop'. United States and South Vietnamese participants conclude that forward movement is unlikely unless events far from the conference room provide the impulse. Spokesmen for North Vietnam and the so-called provisional revolutionary government of South Vietnam say negotiations can begin when the Americans and their allies adopt the provisional government's over-all program as the basis for discussion. The other side's insistence on this point is, on the surface, the reason for the deadlock in a conference that, expanded to include South Vietnamese and the Vietcong, began with such high hopes in January. But other, more complicated elements have contributed to the stalemate."… (31 July) NIXON REBUFFED BY ENEMY IN PARIS… "The negotiators representing the Provisionary Revolutionary Government proclaimed by the National Liberation Front met President Nixon's peace appeal from Saigon today with a statement denouncing the 'obstinate determination' of his government 'to pursue aggression.'… The Communist statement followed the pattern of all those that have preceded it. 'The visit of Mr. Nixon to Southeast Asia and particularly Saigon, shows more clearly to the South Vietnamese population the obstinate determination of Mr. Nixon's Government to pursue aggressiveness and to maintain the Thieu-Ky-Huong puppet administration, which is dictatorial, warlike and corrupted,' it said."… (See Humble Host End Note: NYT OpEd : NIXON ASIAN DOCTRINE… [No more Vietnams] )….



C. THE REST OF THE NYT HEAD LINES… (28 July) NIXON IN JAKARTA–Predicts Surge In Development–Given Warm Welcome–Confers With Suharta–5-Year Plan Lauded–Increase In Aid Hinted–President Departs For Bangkok, Next Stop On Asian Tour… UAR JETS STRIKE SINAI UNCHALLENGED BY ISRAELIS… SOVIETS HELD GLUM OVER APOLLO 11 MOON FEAT–Strains And Embarrassment Reported In Soviet Bloc… PRESIDENT'S TALKS IN ASIA–He Seeks To Enunciate New Desire For More Modest U.S. Role In Area… (29 July) U.S. PANEL URGES HANDGUN SEIZURE TO CURB VIOLENCE–Bids Federal Government Guide Payment Is Advocated–$500-Million Cost Seen To Compensate Owners of Unneeded Weapons… PEKING ASSAILS NIXON 'GOD OF PLAGUE AND WAR'–Calls Asian Trip Conduct of Aggressive Activities… HUBERT HUMPHREY ASKS EDWARD KENNEDY TO NOT STEP DOWN–Statement Asserts 'He Has Served So Ably In Senate'–House Democrats Back Kennedy… (30 July) THE HISTORY OF VIOLENCE IN AMERICA: A Report On The National Commission On The Causes And Prevention of Violence Briefed to Congress… FOOTPRINTS ON THE MOON–Pictures Brought Back By Astronauts–Lunar Module Flight Film Also Released… SIX NATIONS TO JOIN PARLEY ON LIMITING NUCLEAR ARMS–U.S. And Soviet Agree On Widening Geneva Talks… AS MIDEAST FIGHTING HEATS UP, ANALYSTS IN U.S. BELIEVE ISRAEL WOULD AGAIN DEFEAT ARABS… (31 July) ISRAELI JETS RAID A GUERRILLA BASE–Attack Arab Staging Area On Syrian Lebanese Line Near The Golan Heights… KENNEDY TO STAY IN THE SENATE–Implies No 1972 Candidacy For Presidency–Says He Will Seek Reelection in 1970 And Serve Full 6-Year Term–Will Keep Post as Democratic Whip… GALLUP POLL FINDS 53% APPROVE OF NIXON's POLICY ON VIETNAM… WOMEN ORGANIZING TO FIND 1,332 G.I.'s MISSING IN VIETNAM… (1 August) WHITE HOUSE MAPS ARMED FORCES CUT–Planners Consider A Drop Of 50,000 to 200,000 Men In Year–To Trim Budget… SENATE ABM VOTE SET NEXT WEEK–Members Divided… (2 August) U.S. SEEKING HELP OF SOVIET ON LAOS–Moscow Urged To Restrain Hanoi On Assaults in Laos–Fall Of Coaltition Government in Laos Feared… SECRETARY OF STATE ROGERS ASSURES SEOUL OF HELP IN CASE OF ATTACK BY NORTH KOREA–Flies On To Taipei Where He Also Pledges U.S. Support… INQUEST IS DENIED IN TED KENNEDY CASE–Justice In Boston Says He Lacks Jurisdiction Over Prosecution's Request… U.S. SUES GEORGIA TO END SEGREGATION IN ALL SCHOOLS… (3 August) PRESIDENT AVOIDS OFFENDING SOVIET–Talk In Bucharest Assures Moscow That His Visit To Rumania Is A Friendly One… RULING ON DRAFT MAY CURB LOCAL DRAFT BOARDS–Court Says Panel Members Must Reside in Area… DETROIT NEGROES SEEK CIVILIAN REVIEW OF POLICE–Trial Board Drive Opposed By Police Department–May Play Role In Mayoral Race… FOUR JUDGES PRESS SOUTH CAROLINA INTEGRATION–Negroes Oppose Charlotte Plan–Call School Bussing Method 'One Way' Integration… MIDDLE EAST: IS IT BUILDING UP TO ANOTHER EXPLOSION?…



II. COMMANDO HUNT II (APRIL-NOVEMBER 1969)… The following has been snipped from a PACAF COMMANDO HUNT document in the Vietnam archives at Texas Tech…

https://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/reports/images.php?img=/images/1683/168300010912.pdf

ALL-WEATHER AND NIGHT OPERATIONS…

"Operations at night and in bad weather conditions were critical roles of tactical air support in Southeast Asia. To overcome the operational problems, three approaches were in use in Vietnam at the end of 1969: artificial light, COMBAT SKYSPOT, and the A-6A Diane system.

"Two basic types of artificial light were available. The primary sources were flares of various kinds, dropped either by flareships or gunships, by the lead fighter in a flight, or in rare cases, by the FAC himself. Both the F-100 and the F-4 had flares on the lead aircraft standing night alert. The A-37 had not been modified for this mission at the end of 1969, but a study was under way to determine its feasibility. The OV-10 and O-2 FACs were used to drop flares on occasion. The O-1 did not have this capability. The second type of light was the illuminator on the AC-119K.

"This system was designed to improve visibility and target acquisition for use in close air support at night. It was not widely used because illuminators were on the AC-119K, operating out-country in a night truck killing role. In this role, the illuminator was not required. Operating with artificial light, the delivery parameters were general the same as during daylight. Using the illuminator along Laos LOCs would have highlighted the aircraft making it extremely vulnerable to ground fire.

"MSQ-77 radar, called COMBAT SKYSPOT, was the primary means of weather delivery and was also widely used at night. The Air Force required that COMBAT SKYPOT drops be no closer than 1,000-meters to friendly troops. MSQ-77 radar sites were located throughout Southeast Asia and gave coverage to all of South Vietnam, except for a small portion of II CTZ. The operator would vector the aircraft to the target and provide a countdown for weapon release based on his radar presentation. A system similar to the COMBAT SKYSPOT operation was used by Marine aircraft in I CTZ; it used the same procedures, but the radar facilities were compatible only to Marine aircraft.

"The Marine A-6 Intruders in I CTZ also had a bombing system called Diane, consisting of an airborne radar set, a mobile ground beacon, and a ground located FAC. By using a known beacon location, the offset distance and bearing to the target were determined by the FAC and programmed into the aircraft's bombing computer. The radar operator could then use the beacon impulse as a radar target while the aircraft made its bomb run on the offset target up to 99,999-feet away. Using the Diane system drops as close as 500-meters to friendly troops were allowed.

"Weather minimums for visual bombing and support of troops in contact varied but not only with aircraft type but also with terrain, troop situations and ordnance carried. Generally, minimum ranges from a ceiling of 300-feet and 2 miles visibility for the A-1 to 1,500-feet and 5 miles for the F-4 and F-100. Lower weather conditions required the use of the all-weather procedures and equipment described previously.

"Two other night and all-weather systems or procedures, LORAN and COMMANDO NAIL, were used in Laos but not in South Vietnam. The former capability was provided only on certain F-4s at Ubon RTAFB, while the latter used the airborne computer system, on the F-4… (and Navy A-6s)…

"ARC LIGHT missions used two methods of ordnance delivery. About 95 per cent of the time they used COMBAT SKYSPOT. The highly accurate, self-contained radar bombing system of the B-52 was occasionally used to bomb primary targets and a majority of the secondary targets."… End quote (pgs. 58-60)…





III. AIRCRAFT LOSSES IN SOUTHEAST ASIA: 28 JULY THROUGH 3 AUGUST 1969…References include Chris Hobson's updated VIETNAM AIR LOSSES available on line at https://www.VietnamAirLosses.com … During the week ending 3 August 1969 the United States lost eight fixed wing aircraft and eleven valiant American airman were killed in the losses…

(1) On 29 July an A4-F Skyhawk of the VA-23 Black Knights embarked in USS Oriskany was lost at sea following an unsuccessful inflight refueling. During the fueling fuel was sprayed into the intakes of the Skyhawk leading to an uncontrollable engine fire. The pilot ejected and was rescued to fly and fight again… (And Dutch Rauch, who had flown a 3.0 nite strike prior to this flight by a squadron mate, slept through the whole evolution and can't even remember who the VA-23 soul was that went flying dry and came home wet.)…

(2) On 1 August a Marine A-4E of the VMA-211 Avengers and MAG-12 out of Chu Lai piloted by CAPTAIN P.H. COURNEY, USMC, was hit by ground fire while conducting attacks on a gun position near the DMZ. He was able to fly the damaged Skyhawk east over the Gulf of Tonkin before the battle damage cascaded into failure and required him to eject. He was rescued by SAR forces to fly and fight again…

(3) On 1 August an F-4E of the 421st TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN TOMMY LEON CALLIES and WSO 1LT DOUGLAS GLENN BURD was lost when hit by ground fire at very low altitude in a dusk napalm attack 20 miles southwest of Quang Ngai in South Vietnam, according to Hobson. POWNETWORK records indicate the Phantom was downed while executing a SKYSPOT mission. In either case, the aircraft and two aviators were lost at sundown in dense jungle occupied by enemy troops. POWNETWORK reported in 1990: "Observers feel that Tommie Callies and Doug Burd died in the crash of their plane, and circumstances surrounding the area of crash indicate a very good chance the enemy knew what happened to them. The two are on the rolls of the missing because their bodies are in enemy hands." In 2001 this was updated by the Defense Department in a letter to an individual who requested more information on CAPTAIN CALLIES status…

Humble Host quotes that letter here in its entirely to indicate the relentless effort our government invests in pursuit of the men we left behind… I quote:

"The case of Capt Callies has been investigated a few times since your last visit to our office (AFPC/DPWCM)

"1993: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team interviewed four witnesses who provided information concerning the shoot down of a jet aircraft. Witness accounts, although sketchy, were generally consistent with facts of this case. The team was led to a crash site, conducted a surface search and found only a few small pieces of aluminum and fiberglass. No remains or personal effects were found. This site had been extensively scavenged since the incident occurred. Analysis of the material evidence found at the site were insufficient to establish correlation to Capt Callies' incident.

"1995: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team interviewed three witnesses. One of these individuals led the team to an alleged crash site which the team surveyed. No remains or personal effects were found. Although the team found physical evidence of an aircraft crash site they did not find remains near the crash site or on the hillside below the crash site.

"1997: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team surveyed a reported crash site, recovering several pieces of possible aircraft wreckage. The team did not recover or receive remains of personal effects during this investigation. Analyst comments: The amount of wreckage indicated an aircraft crash site, however, this wreckage could not be correlated to Capt Callies, while the team was on location. A Joint Team would have to excavate the site to obtain sufficient material evidence to correlate the crash site. The likelihood of recovering remains is unknown. Recommendation: Excavate. Analysis of the items recovered at this site are sufficient to establish a probable correlation to the aircraft involved in Capt Callies' (and 1LT Burd's) incident.

"1997: During this Joint Field Activity, an excavation team excavated a total of 476 square meters to culturally sterile soil. The team recovered no human remains from the project area. The team recovered one personal effect (broken rusty pocket knife) and several pieces of life support materials. Preliminary field analysis indicates that at least one individual was in the aircraft at the time of the incident. JTF-FA analysis indicates the items recovered correlate to a F-4 aircraft incident, but are insufficient to establish an exclusive correlation to Capt Callies' specific aircraft. And the presence of three survival kit drop line storage flutes indicates two individuals were in the aircraft at impact. JTF-FA files indicate there are two F-4 crash sites within 15 kilometers of this excavation site. This site was excavated to it's limits and was closed by the anthropologist on 20 August 1997..

"We have not received any additional information pertaining to the case of Capt Callies (1LT Burd)…"… End quote

HUMBLE HOST recommends reading the Los Angles Times article by David Lamb titled "ISSUE OF MIAs IN VIETNAM LOSING STEAM" dated 27 December 1997 posted at:

http://www.scopesys.com/cgi-bin/bio2.cgi?bio=C357

CAPTAIN CALLIES and 1LT BURD are memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial and honored on the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington, but they rest in peace where they fell on the battlefield fifty years ago…

(4) On 1 August an A-7A of the VA-37 Bulls embarked in USS Kitty Hawk piloted by LCDR GEORGE FRANCIS TALKEN was lost on a night approach to the carrier after returning from a strike mission where enemy opposition may or may not have been encountered. The A-7 Corsair suffered engine failure 17 miles aft of the carrier and LCDR TALKEN apparently went into the sea with his disabled aircraft. An extensive search found aircraft debris at the site of the crash, but failed to find LCDR TALKEN. He rests in peace where he fell a few months more than 50 years ago.

(5) On 2 August an F-8J Crusader of the VF-53 Iron Angels embarked in USS Bon Homme Richard was lost on a BARCAP mission when the engine exploded. The pilot, LT G. WELLS, successfully ejected from the 'sader and was rescued from the sea snakes of the Gulf by a Navy helicopter to fly and cap again…

(6) On 2 August an O-1E of the 20th TASS and 504th TASG out of Danang piloted by 1LT HAL KENT HENDERSON and an Army CH-47C Chinook of the 159th ASHB, 101st Airborne Division, collided in mid-air in Quang Nam province killing 1LT HENDERSON and the five troopers in the Chinook: WO T.L. DIVES; CWO R.A. VAQUERA; SGT THOMAS KEVIN RYAN; SGT DAVID ALBERT IRELAN; and SP4 JAMES SHELTON STACEY. 1LT HENDERSON lies at rest at Sunset Hills Cemetery in Bozeman, Montana.

(7) On 3 August an F-4D of the 390th TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN A.C. STRIPE and WSO 1LT A.G. HENDRICK were hit by 37mm ground fire on a COMMANDO HUNT mission about 20 miles west of Khe Sanh. CAPTAIN STRIPE opted to head west to Ubon with the battle damaged Phantom but both aviators were forced to eject just short of Ubon when the Phantom gave up the ghost. They were rescued by an Air Force RESCAP helo.

(8) On 3 August an F-4E of the 4th TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN JAMES DAVID WHITE and WSO CAPTAIN EDWARD MORTON was downed by 12.7mm anti-aircraft fire as it delivered napalm from low level on a target 30 miles southwest of Danang. The two intrepid aviators were unable to escape the aircraft before it crashed and exploded in hilly terrain. The remains of both aviators were recovered and CAPTAIN WHITE rests in peace at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. CAPTAIN MORTON, a distinguished graduate of Texas A&M, is memorialized on the Corps Plaza Memorial and is buried at the Air Force Academy Cemetery in Colorado Springs.





IV. HUMBLE HOST END NOTE: The New York Times, 3 August 1969, Opinion Editorial, page 46: I quote…

NIXON'S ASIAN DOCTRINE

"American postwar policy in Asia undoubtedly will be shaped in large degree by the experience in Vietnam, the peace settlement achieved there and the situation in Southeast Asia that then emerges. But conversely, the effort to define American peace objectives in Vietnam–and to convince the Communist powers that an accommodation is feasible–demands a clear concept of true American interests in Asia and the more limited role the United States in the future will want to play there, particularly in the military field.

"The reduced military role that President Nixon foresees in the postwar period would bring the American strategic posture back to a more traditional form. The United States is, by definition, a Pacific power. It has long held island outposts near the rim of Asia. But that is not the same as being an Asian power. Nor is American air and sea supremacy over the Pacific and much of Asia the equivalent of a ground capability against Asia's mass armies or guerrilla fighters. Traditional American military doctrine has rightly sought to avoid large-scale land warfare on the Asian continent. The United States will neither be 'running out on Asia' nor heading toward isolationism if, in the postwar period, it limits its commitments and involvements to a more sober assessment of its capabilities than was made by President Johnson.

"The pattern President Nixon has sketched during his current Asian travels conforms to the treaty commitments he has insisted the United States will honor. Neither the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization nor any other formal commitment obligates the United States to contribute combat troops to resist internal subversion or guerrilla insurgency, even if Communist-inspired. Nor is the United States obligated, when external invasions are involved, to take the primary role in defending nations that are incapable–either through military deficiency or socio-political flaws–of mobilizing themselves for self-defense.

"'Peace and progress in Asia must be shaped and protected primarily by Asian hands' and the American contribution 'should come as a supplement to Asian energies and in response to Asian leadership,' Mr. Nixon said at Manilla airport. Another of his major themes was that the American stake in Asian stability can often be better furthered by economic rather than military aid.

"This is the American policy favored by the leaders of Indonesia who have set an example for Asians in defending themselves without outside aid against Communist subversion. Filipinos support the concept. So do the Thais. And even in a beleaguered South Vietnam the nation's military leaders have recognized that Vietnamization of the war and the gradual withdrawal of American ground combat troops is the right course to follow.

"Mr. Nixon's doctrine is neither new nor remarkable. Yet the Johnson aberration in converting South Vietnam's war from 'their war,' as President Kennedy described it, to 'ours' gives Mr. Nixon's restatement of the traditional American approach the character of a great divide in policy. It responds to the American desire for no more Vietnams. It provides reassurance for Asians that American withdrawal from a land war on the continent does not terminate American interest in and aid for Asians.

"And, perhaps most important, it signals to Hanoi, Peking and Moscow that the United States seeks a strategic accommodation for Asia as a whole for which Vietnam could well set the pattern."…. End Quote…



HUMBLE HOST STINGER: Humble Host respectfully suggests our President take notes from this astute conclusion and the "Nixon Doctrine." No more Afghanistans. No more conversions of "their war" to "our war."… No more attempts to establish democracy where centuries of history tell us it cannot be done… Our President needs to formulate and declare a "Trump Doctrine" that reflects the bloody lessons of our repeated entanglements in foreign fights, including Vietnam and Afghanistan (and Syria, Iraq, etc…)… OR, call it "THE END OF ENDLESS WARS DOCTRINE."… the rationale remains the same…

Lest we forget… Bear



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This Day in Aviation History" brought to you by the Daedalians Airpower Blog Update. To subscribe to this weekly email, go to https://daedalians.org/airpower-blog/



Oct. 20, 1911

The world's first military airplane – the 1909 Wright Military Flyer – was presented to the Smithsonian. It is on display at the Early Flight exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Learn more HERE.

Oct. 21, 1942

Eight men including World War I ace, Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, USAAC (Ret.), crashed in a B-17D Flying Fortress, in the Central Pacific as a result of a navigational error while Rickenbacker toured Allied forces in the Pacific. At one point, Sgt. Alexander Kaczmarczyk, USAAF, died and the castaways buried him at sea. On Nov. 12, Lt. j.g. F. E. Woodward and ARM2 L. H. Boutte flying a Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher of VS-1 Detachment 14, spotted a life raft containing the pilot of the Flying Fortress, Capt. William T. Cherry Jr., USAAF. A patrol torpedo boat rescued him. The next day, Lt. William F. Eadie and Boutte crewed the same Kingfisher and spotted the raft carrying Rickenbacker; Capt. Hans C. Adamson, USAAF; and Pvt. John F. Bartek, USAAF; off Nukufetau in the Ellice Islands (Tuvalu). Eadie landed the Kingfisher, rescued the three men, and taxied 40 miles to the nearest land. The Navy later rescued the other three survivors. Rickenbacker was Daedalian Founder Member #169.

Oct. 22, 1951

Two 3rd Air Rescue Squadron SA-16s rescued a 12-man crew of a downed B-29, the highest number rescued by SA-16s on any day in the Korean War.

Oct. 23, 1951

Col. Michael N. McCoy, the 306th BMW commander, flew SAC's first operational Boeing B-47 (No. 50-008) to his wing at MacDill AFB, Florida. In a ceremony Nov. 19, the B-47 received the name, "The Real McCoy."

Oct. 24, 1964

First Lt. Valmore Bourque, U.S. Air Force Academy Class of '60, became the first graduate to die in combat. He was killed when his C-123B was struck by ground fire over Cambodia and crashed. Bourque was promoted to captain posthumously. His name appears on the War Memorial on the Academy Terrazzo, and his statue stands in the Mall of Heroes between Fairchild and Vandenberg Halls. Coincidentally, on July 11, 1955, he was the first person to be sworn in as an Air Force Academy cadet.

Oct. 25, 1911

Navy Lts. Theodore G. Ellyson and John H. Towers flew A-1 (later AH-1) during an experiment to test the plane's durability on a cross-country flight from Annapolis, Md., to Fort Monroe, Va. A leaking radiator forced the aircraft down near Milford Haven, Va., after covering 112 miles in 122 minutes. This flight began a 10-day struggle to make the round trip. Ellyson was Daedalian Founder Member #4377; Towers was #4093.

Oct. 26, 1909

After instruction from Wilbur Wright, Lt. Frederick E. Humphreys and Lt. Frank P. Lahm became the first Army officers to solo in a Wright airplane at College Park, Maryland. Humphreys was Daedalian Founder Member #1433 and Lahm, #211.



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Thanks to Dick

Flying boats--long but impressive

From my friend, Gary.
Subject: Flying boats--long but impressive



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y22F9O3A0EM



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The List 5125

To All,

I hope that you all had a great weekend

Regards,

Skip

Today in Naval History

October 21

1797 The frigate Constitution launches at Edmund Hartt's Shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy.

1862 The Cairo class ironclad river gunboat Louisville, under the command of Lt. Cmdr. R.W. Meade III, escorts the steamer Meteor, whose embarked Army troops landed at Bledsoes Landing and Hamblins Landing, Ark. The towns are burned in reprisal for attacks by Confederate guerrillas on mail steamer Gladiator early in the morning of Oct. 19.

1864 The wooden side-wheel cruiser Fort Jackson captures steamer Wando at sea, east of Cape Romain, S.C., with cargo of cotton.

1942 The British submarine HMS Seraph lands Navy Capt. Jerauld Wright and four Army officers including Maj. Gen. Mark Clark at Cherchel, French North Africa to meet with a French military delegation to assess French attitude towards future Allied landings (Operation Torch). Eventually, the French agreed to the mission.

1942 USS Guardfish (SS 217) sinks Japanese freighter Nichiho Maru about 120 miles north-northeast of Formosa while USS Gudgeon (SS 211) attacks a Japanese convoy in the Bismarck Sea and sinks the transport Choko Maru.

1952 USS Lewis (DE 535) aids two Korean minesweepers under fire at Wonson Harbor. As she approaches, at least four enemy batteries open up on the destroyer escort. Lewis returns fire and lays down a smoke screen to cover the minesweepers retreat. Shortly thereafter the destroyer escort takes two 75mm shell hits, killing six crewmen outright and mortally wounding a seventh. The second hit explodes on the main deck, port side, lightly wounding one sailor.

1989 Los Angeles-class submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) is commissioned at Groton, CT

1995 USS Stethem (DDG 63) is commissioned at Port Hueneme, Calif., and named in honor of Bronze Star and Purple Heart recipient, Robert Dean Stethem. She is the 13th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the U.S. Navy.

2017 Expeditionary Sea Base USNS Hershel "Woody" Williams (ESB 4) is put into service during a christening ceremony at General Dynamics NASSCO, San Diego.



Thanks to CHINFO

Executive Summary:

• During a visit to Italy on Friday, CNO Adm. Mike Gilday stressed the importance of timely ship maintenance and training, reports Stars and Stripes.

• The Wall Street Journal reports that Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Speaker Nancy Pelosi separately traveled to Afghanistan to allay concerns of a U.S. troop withdrawal, as Kurdish-led forces withdrew from a border town in northeastern Syria, fulfilling part of the cease-fire agreement between Turkey.

• Singapore enhanced defense ties with China, reports the Straits Times.

• Sailors and Marines are strengthening Blue-Green ties during COMPTUEX aboard USS Bataan ARG reports Defense Aerospace Report.





Today in History: October 21

1096 Seljuk Turks at Chivitot slaughter thousands of German crusaders.

1529 The Pope names Henry VIII of England Defender of the Faith after defending the seven sacraments against Luther.



1600 Tokugawa Ieyasu defeats his enemies in battle and affirms his position as Japan's most powerful warlord.



1790 The Tricolor is chosen as the official flag of France.



1805 Vice Admiral and Viscount Horatio Nelson wins his greatest victory over a Franco-Spanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar, fought off Cape Trafalgar, Spain. Nelson is fatally wounded in the battle, but lives long enough to see victory.



1837 Under a flag of truce during peace talks, U.S. troops siege the Indian Seminole Chief Osceola in Florida.



1861 The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Va. begins, a disastrous Union defeat which sparks Congressional investigations.



1867 Many leaders of the Kiowa, Comanche and Kiowa-Apache sign a peace treaty at Medicine Lodge, Kan. Comanche Chief Quanah Parker refused to accept the treaty terms.



1872 The U.S. Naval Academy admits John H. Conyers, the first African American to be accepted.



1879 After 14 months of testing, Thomas Edison first demonstrates his electric lamp, hoping to one day compete with gaslight.



1904 Panamanians clash with U.S. Marines in Panama in a brief uprising.



1917 The first U.S. troops enter the front lines at Sommerviller under French command.



1939 As war heats up with Germany, the British war cabinet holds its first meeting in the underground war room in London.



1940 Ernest Hemingway's novel For Whom the Bell Tolls is published.



1942 Eight American and British officers land from a submarine on an Algerian beach to take measure of Vichy French to the Operation Torch landings.



1950 North Korean Premier Kim Il-Sung establishes a new capital at Sinuiju on the Yalu River opposite the Chinese City of Antung.



1959 The Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opens in Manhattan.



1961 Bob Dylan records his first album in a single day at a cost of $400.



1967 The "March on the Pentagon," protesting American involvement in Vietnam , draws 50,000 protesters.



1969 Israel's Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan resigns over disagreements with Prime Minister Menachem Begin over policies related to the Palestinians.



1983 The United States sends a ten-ship task force to Grenada.



1994 North Korea and the US sign an agreement requiring North Korea to halts its nuclear weapons program and agree to international inspections.










19th Century


1805


Battle of Trafalgar »






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Thanks to THE Bear -



COMMANDO HUNT and ROLLING THUNDER REMEMBERED… WEEK THIRTY-EIGHT of the HUNT… 28 JULY TO 3 AUGUST 1969…

October 20, 2019Bear Taylor

COMMEMORATING THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE VIETNAM WAR (1961-1973)…

LAST WE FORGET… The New York Times, Friday, 1 August 1969. Page 1: Dateline, Saigon, July 31… "U.S. WAR DEAD 110 IN WEEK IS 1969 LOW–Foe's Casualties Also Drop Reflecting Vietnam Lull"… "United States combat deaths dropped to 110 last week, the lowest weekly toll this year and the fourth lowest in two years… North Vietnamese and Vietcong casualties in the week ended last Saturday (26 July) were also the year's lowest at 1,963 killed. The statistics for the period preceding President Nixon's visit to the war zone reflected the continuing lull that began June 20 in the ground fighting. However, 290 South Vietnamese soldiers were killed…underlining the increased share in combat being taken by Government forces….1,056 Americans were wounded, 468 seriously enough for hospital treatment…."… English philosopher G.K. CHESTERTON: "The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him."….

GOOD MORNING. It is Monday, 21 October 2019. Humble Host recalls a week of the Vietnam War and the Thirty-Eighth week of COMMANDO HUNT, the unrelenting air interdiction campaign to hunt-and-kill North Vietnamese activities on the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos…



I. HEAD LINES FROM The NEW YORK TIMES for 28 July through 3 August 1969…

A. THE WAR… (28 July) TEN DIE IN VIETNAM AS RESCUE COPTER IS DOWN–SEVEN CIVILIANS KILLED–B-52 CRASHES IN GUAM, SIX DIE… "A United States Marine helicopter carrying a wounded North Vietnamese prisoner from the battlefield to a hospital was shot down yesterday by enemy gunners. All nine Americans aboard and the prisoner were killed. The area is one of thick jungle undergrowth long held by North Vietnamese regulars and Vietcong guerrillas. The Queson Valley has been the scene of frequent heavy fighting in the past. The CH-46 was the 1,252nd American helicopter reported shot down and destroyed by enemy gunners during the war… American infantrymen sweeping northeast of Saigon reported having killed 19 enemy soldiers today in a three-hour fight…Marines killed five enemy soldiers 20 miles south of Danang."… GUERRILLAS ATTACK U.S. AIR BASE AT UBON IN THAILAND… (29 July) NIXON ASSERTS U.S. WILL STAND WITH THAIS AGAINST ALL FOES–Remark In Bangkok Taken As Attempt To Reassure An Apprehensive Ally–Promise Not Specific–Aide Denies That President Contradicted His Plan For Disengagement… FIGHTING ERUPTS NORTH OF SAIGON–53 Enemy Dead in Largest Battle Since 'Lull' Began… (30 July) NIXON REPORTED VISITING VIETNAM–Due To See Thieu–Leaves Thailand–Bunker And Abrams On Plane–President To Talk With Troops At Bien Hoa… G.I.'s JOIN BATTLE WEST OF SAIGON–Arrive By Copter To Bolster Allies In All-Day Clash… "…reinforce South Vietnamese irregulars near the Cambodian border, and the joint force reported having killed 63 North Vietnamese soldiers in all-day battle."... (31 July) VIETNAM WAR LULL ENTERS 7th WEEK… "The summer lull in the Vietnam war entered its seventh week today, one of the quietest days since it began… Prior to President Nixon's arrival here today, about 750 United States troops left Vietnam as part of his plan to cut United States strength by the end of August…. They are bound for Hawaii."… (2 August) U.S. SAID TO TEST ENEMY BY LIMITING BIG ATTACKS… "There are indications that the United States is testing the enemy's willingness to scale down the Vietnam war gradually by reducing its own offensive operations during the current battlefield lull. Defense Department officials assert that the reduction in American offensive sweeps in Vietnam is a response to the slackening of the enemy's attacks. But the officials acknowledge that they are interested in seeing whether, as a result of the modest American tactics now, the enemy is willing to prolong the battlefield lull. "… (3 August) U.S. PLANES ATTACK FOE IN BUFFER ZONE… "United States warplanes and artillery bombarded North Vietnamese troops and rocket launching sites in the demilitarized zone twice yesterday… 76 enemy soldiers were killed in other small skirmishes across the country…"…



B. PARIS PEACE TALKS… (28 July) AN INFORMAL TRUCE SEEN BY SENATOR MIKE MANSFIELD… "…said today that the lack of progress in the Paris peace talks could mean that fighting in South Vietnam would fade away without any formal agreement to end the war. In an interview the Senate Democrat leader accused North Vietnam of being intransigent and that there might never be a negotiated cease-fire. He said he was certain that if there had been any real progress in the Paris talks it would have been reported to Congressional leaders and that he had received no such reports. In another comment, former Secretary of State Dean Rusk said today that he doubted that any Asian policy of the Nixon Administration would differ greatly from that of former President Lyndon B. Johnson if United States interests were to be served."… (30 July) DREW MIDDLETON… BEHIND THE PARIS PEACE TALKS–Only Events Far From The Conference Can Provide The Impulse For Progress… "The Vietnam peace talks appear to be going from 'dead slow' to 'dead stop'. United States and South Vietnamese participants conclude that forward movement is unlikely unless events far from the conference room provide the impulse. Spokesmen for North Vietnam and the so-called provisional revolutionary government of South Vietnam say negotiations can begin when the Americans and their allies adopt the provisional government's over-all program as the basis for discussion. The other side's insistence on this point is, on the surface, the reason for the deadlock in a conference that, expanded to include South Vietnamese and the Vietcong, began with such high hopes in January. But other, more complicated elements have contributed to the stalemate."… (31 July) NIXON REBUFFED BY ENEMY IN PARIS… "The negotiators representing the Provisionary Revolutionary Government proclaimed by the National Liberation Front met President Nixon's peace appeal from Saigon today with a statement denouncing the 'obstinate determination' of his government 'to pursue aggression.'… The Communist statement followed the pattern of all those that have preceded it. 'The visit of Mr. Nixon to Southeast Asia and particularly Saigon, shows more clearly to the South Vietnamese population the obstinate determination of Mr. Nixon's Government to pursue aggressiveness and to maintain the Thieu-Ky-Huong puppet administration, which is dictatorial, warlike and corrupted,' it said."… (See Humble Host End Note: NYT OpEd : NIXON ASIAN DOCTRINE… [No more Vietnams] )….



C. THE REST OF THE NYT HEAD LINES… (28 July) NIXON IN JAKARTA–Predicts Surge In Development–Given Warm Welcome–Confers With Suharta–5-Year Plan Lauded–Increase In Aid Hinted–President Departs For Bangkok, Next Stop On Asian Tour… UAR JETS STRIKE SINAI UNCHALLENGED BY ISRAELIS… SOVIETS HELD GLUM OVER APOLLO 11 MOON FEAT–Strains And Embarrassment Reported In Soviet Bloc… PRESIDENT'S TALKS IN ASIA–He Seeks To Enunciate New Desire For More Modest U.S. Role In Area… (29 July) U.S. PANEL URGES HANDGUN SEIZURE TO CURB VIOLENCE–Bids Federal Government Guide Payment Is Advocated–$500-Million Cost Seen To Compensate Owners of Unneeded Weapons… PEKING ASSAILS NIXON 'GOD OF PLAGUE AND WAR'–Calls Asian Trip Conduct of Aggressive Activities… HUBERT HUMPHREY ASKS EDWARD KENNEDY TO NOT STEP DOWN–Statement Asserts 'He Has Served So Ably In Senate'–House Democrats Back Kennedy… (30 July) THE HISTORY OF VIOLENCE IN AMERICA: A Report On The National Commission On The Causes And Prevention of Violence Briefed to Congress… FOOTPRINTS ON THE MOON–Pictures Brought Back By Astronauts–Lunar Module Flight Film Also Released… SIX NATIONS TO JOIN PARLEY ON LIMITING NUCLEAR ARMS–U.S. And Soviet Agree On Widening Geneva Talks… AS MIDEAST FIGHTING HEATS UP, ANALYSTS IN U.S. BELIEVE ISRAEL WOULD AGAIN DEFEAT ARABS… (31 July) ISRAELI JETS RAID A GUERRILLA BASE–Attack Arab Staging Area On Syrian Lebanese Line Near The Golan Heights… KENNEDY TO STAY IN THE SENATE–Implies No 1972 Candidacy For Presidency–Says He Will Seek Reelection in 1970 And Serve Full 6-Year Term–Will Keep Post as Democratic Whip… GALLUP POLL FINDS 53% APPROVE OF NIXON's POLICY ON VIETNAM… WOMEN ORGANIZING TO FIND 1,332 G.I.'s MISSING IN VIETNAM… (1 August) WHITE HOUSE MAPS ARMED FORCES CUT–Planners Consider A Drop Of 50,000 to 200,000 Men In Year–To Trim Budget… SENATE ABM VOTE SET NEXT WEEK–Members Divided… (2 August) U.S. SEEKING HELP OF SOVIET ON LAOS–Moscow Urged To Restrain Hanoi On Assaults in Laos–Fall Of Coaltition Government in Laos Feared… SECRETARY OF STATE ROGERS ASSURES SEOUL OF HELP IN CASE OF ATTACK BY NORTH KOREA–Flies On To Taipei Where He Also Pledges U.S. Support… INQUEST IS DENIED IN TED KENNEDY CASE–Justice In Boston Says He Lacks Jurisdiction Over Prosecution's Request… U.S. SUES GEORGIA TO END SEGREGATION IN ALL SCHOOLS… (3 August) PRESIDENT AVOIDS OFFENDING SOVIET–Talk In Bucharest Assures Moscow That His Visit To Rumania Is A Friendly One… RULING ON DRAFT MAY CURB LOCAL DRAFT BOARDS–Court Says Panel Members Must Reside in Area… DETROIT NEGROES SEEK CIVILIAN REVIEW OF POLICE–Trial Board Drive Opposed By Police Department–May Play Role In Mayoral Race… FOUR JUDGES PRESS SOUTH CAROLINA INTEGRATION–Negroes Oppose Charlotte Plan–Call School Bussing Method 'One Way' Integration… MIDDLE EAST: IS IT BUILDING UP TO ANOTHER EXPLOSION?…



II. COMMANDO HUNT II (APRIL-NOVEMBER 1969)… The following has been snipped from a PACAF COMMANDO HUNT document in the Vietnam archives at Texas Tech…

https://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/reports/images.php?img=/images/1683/168300010912.pdf

ALL-WEATHER AND NIGHT OPERATIONS…

"Operations at night and in bad weather conditions were critical roles of tactical air support in Southeast Asia. To overcome the operational problems, three approaches were in use in Vietnam at the end of 1969: artificial light, COMBAT SKYSPOT, and the A-6A Diane system.

"Two basic types of artificial light were available. The primary sources were flares of various kinds, dropped either by flareships or gunships, by the lead fighter in a flight, or in rare cases, by the FAC himself. Both the F-100 and the F-4 had flares on the lead aircraft standing night alert. The A-37 had not been modified for this mission at the end of 1969, but a study was under way to determine its feasibility. The OV-10 and O-2 FACs were used to drop flares on occasion. The O-1 did not have this capability. The second type of light was the illuminator on the AC-119K.

"This system was designed to improve visibility and target acquisition for use in close air support at night. It was not widely used because illuminators were on the AC-119K, operating out-country in a night truck killing role. In this role, the illuminator was not required. Operating with artificial light, the delivery parameters were general the same as during daylight. Using the illuminator along Laos LOCs would have highlighted the aircraft making it extremely vulnerable to ground fire.

"MSQ-77 radar, called COMBAT SKYSPOT, was the primary means of weather delivery and was also widely used at night. The Air Force required that COMBAT SKYPOT drops be no closer than 1,000-meters to friendly troops. MSQ-77 radar sites were located throughout Southeast Asia and gave coverage to all of South Vietnam, except for a small portion of II CTZ. The operator would vector the aircraft to the target and provide a countdown for weapon release based on his radar presentation. A system similar to the COMBAT SKYSPOT operation was used by Marine aircraft in I CTZ; it used the same procedures, but the radar facilities were compatible only to Marine aircraft.

"The Marine A-6 Intruders in I CTZ also had a bombing system called Diane, consisting of an airborne radar set, a mobile ground beacon, and a ground located FAC. By using a known beacon location, the offset distance and bearing to the target were determined by the FAC and programmed into the aircraft's bombing computer. The radar operator could then use the beacon impulse as a radar target while the aircraft made its bomb run on the offset target up to 99,999-feet away. Using the Diane system drops as close as 500-meters to friendly troops were allowed.

"Weather minimums for visual bombing and support of troops in contact varied but not only with aircraft type but also with terrain, troop situations and ordnance carried. Generally, minimum ranges from a ceiling of 300-feet and 2 miles visibility for the A-1 to 1,500-feet and 5 miles for the F-4 and F-100. Lower weather conditions required the use of the all-weather procedures and equipment described previously.

"Two other night and all-weather systems or procedures, LORAN and COMMANDO NAIL, were used in Laos but not in South Vietnam. The former capability was provided only on certain F-4s at Ubon RTAFB, while the latter used the airborne computer system, on the F-4… (and Navy A-6s)…

"ARC LIGHT missions used two methods of ordnance delivery. About 95 per cent of the time they used COMBAT SKYSPOT. The highly accurate, self-contained radar bombing system of the B-52 was occasionally used to bomb primary targets and a majority of the secondary targets."… End quote (pgs. 58-60)…





III. AIRCRAFT LOSSES IN SOUTHEAST ASIA: 28 JULY THROUGH 3 AUGUST 1969…References include Chris Hobson's updated VIETNAM AIR LOSSES available on line at https://www.VietnamAirLosses.com … During the week ending 3 August 1969 the United States lost eight fixed wing aircraft and eleven valiant American airman were killed in the losses…

(1) On 29 July an A4-F Skyhawk of the VA-23 Black Knights embarked in USS Oriskany was lost at sea following an unsuccessful inflight refueling. During the fueling fuel was sprayed into the intakes of the Skyhawk leading to an uncontrollable engine fire. The pilot ejected and was rescued to fly and fight again… (And Dutch Rauch, who had flown a 3.0 nite strike prior to this flight by a squadron mate, slept through the whole evolution and can't even remember who the VA-23 soul was that went flying dry and came home wet.)…

(2) On 1 August a Marine A-4E of the VMA-211 Avengers and MAG-12 out of Chu Lai piloted by CAPTAIN P.H. COURNEY, USMC, was hit by ground fire while conducting attacks on a gun position near the DMZ. He was able to fly the damaged Skyhawk east over the Gulf of Tonkin before the battle damage cascaded into failure and required him to eject. He was rescued by SAR forces to fly and fight again…

(3) On 1 August an F-4E of the 421st TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN TOMMY LEON CALLIES and WSO 1LT DOUGLAS GLENN BURD was lost when hit by ground fire at very low altitude in a dusk napalm attack 20 miles southwest of Quang Ngai in South Vietnam, according to Hobson. POWNETWORK records indicate the Phantom was downed while executing a SKYSPOT mission. In either case, the aircraft and two aviators were lost at sundown in dense jungle occupied by enemy troops. POWNETWORK reported in 1990: "Observers feel that Tommie Callies and Doug Burd died in the crash of their plane, and circumstances surrounding the area of crash indicate a very good chance the enemy knew what happened to them. The two are on the rolls of the missing because their bodies are in enemy hands." In 2001 this was updated by the Defense Department in a letter to an individual who requested more information on CAPTAIN CALLIES status…

Humble Host quotes that letter here in its entirely to indicate the relentless effort our government invests in pursuit of the men we left behind… I quote:

"The case of Capt Callies has been investigated a few times since your last visit to our office (AFPC/DPWCM)

"1993: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team interviewed four witnesses who provided information concerning the shoot down of a jet aircraft. Witness accounts, although sketchy, were generally consistent with facts of this case. The team was led to a crash site, conducted a surface search and found only a few small pieces of aluminum and fiberglass. No remains or personal effects were found. This site had been extensively scavenged since the incident occurred. Analysis of the material evidence found at the site were insufficient to establish correlation to Capt Callies' incident.

"1995: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team interviewed three witnesses. One of these individuals led the team to an alleged crash site which the team surveyed. No remains or personal effects were found. Although the team found physical evidence of an aircraft crash site they did not find remains near the crash site or on the hillside below the crash site.

"1997: During this Joint Field Activity, an investigative team surveyed a reported crash site, recovering several pieces of possible aircraft wreckage. The team did not recover or receive remains of personal effects during this investigation. Analyst comments: The amount of wreckage indicated an aircraft crash site, however, this wreckage could not be correlated to Capt Callies, while the team was on location. A Joint Team would have to excavate the site to obtain sufficient material evidence to correlate the crash site. The likelihood of recovering remains is unknown. Recommendation: Excavate. Analysis of the items recovered at this site are sufficient to establish a probable correlation to the aircraft involved in Capt Callies' (and 1LT Burd's) incident.

"1997: During this Joint Field Activity, an excavation team excavated a total of 476 square meters to culturally sterile soil. The team recovered no human remains from the project area. The team recovered one personal effect (broken rusty pocket knife) and several pieces of life support materials. Preliminary field analysis indicates that at least one individual was in the aircraft at the time of the incident. JTF-FA analysis indicates the items recovered correlate to a F-4 aircraft incident, but are insufficient to establish an exclusive correlation to Capt Callies' specific aircraft. And the presence of three survival kit drop line storage flutes indicates two individuals were in the aircraft at impact. JTF-FA files indicate there are two F-4 crash sites within 15 kilometers of this excavation site. This site was excavated to it's limits and was closed by the anthropologist on 20 August 1997..

"We have not received any additional information pertaining to the case of Capt Callies (1LT Burd)…"… End quote

HUMBLE HOST recommends reading the Los Angles Times article by David Lamb titled "ISSUE OF MIAs IN VIETNAM LOSING STEAM" dated 27 December 1997 posted at:

http://www.scopesys.com/cgi-bin/bio2.cgi?bio=C357

CAPTAIN CALLIES and 1LT BURD are memorialized at Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial and honored on the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington, but they rest in peace where they fell on the battlefield fifty years ago…

(4) On 1 August an A-7A of the VA-37 Bulls embarked in USS Kitty Hawk piloted by LCDR GEORGE FRANCIS TALKEN was lost on a night approach to the carrier after returning from a strike mission where enemy opposition may or may not have been encountered. The A-7 Corsair suffered engine failure 17 miles aft of the carrier and LCDR TALKEN apparently went into the sea with his disabled aircraft. An extensive search found aircraft debris at the site of the crash, but failed to find LCDR TALKEN. He rests in peace where he fell a few months more than 50 years ago.

(5) On 2 August an F-8J Crusader of the VF-53 Iron Angels embarked in USS Bon Homme Richard was lost on a BARCAP mission when the engine exploded. The pilot, LT G. WELLS, successfully ejected from the 'sader and was rescued from the sea snakes of the Gulf by a Navy helicopter to fly and cap again…

(6) On 2 August an O-1E of the 20th TASS and 504th TASG out of Danang piloted by 1LT HAL KENT HENDERSON and an Army CH-47C Chinook of the 159th ASHB, 101st Airborne Division, collided in mid-air in Quang Nam province killing 1LT HENDERSON and the five troopers in the Chinook: WO T.L. DIVES; CWO R.A. VAQUERA; SGT THOMAS KEVIN RYAN; SGT DAVID ALBERT IRELAN; and SP4 JAMES SHELTON STACEY. 1LT HENDERSON lies at rest at Sunset Hills Cemetery in Bozeman, Montana.

(7) On 3 August an F-4D of the 390th TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN A.C. STRIPE and WSO 1LT A.G. HENDRICK were hit by 37mm ground fire on a COMMANDO HUNT mission about 20 miles west of Khe Sanh. CAPTAIN STRIPE opted to head west to Ubon with the battle damaged Phantom but both aviators were forced to eject just short of Ubon when the Phantom gave up the ghost. They were rescued by an Air Force RESCAP helo.

(8) On 3 August an F-4E of the 4th TFS and 366th TFW out of Danang piloted by CAPTAIN JAMES DAVID WHITE and WSO CAPTAIN EDWARD MORTON was downed by 12.7mm anti-aircraft fire as it delivered napalm from low level on a target 30 miles southwest of Danang. The two intrepid aviators were unable to escape the aircraft before it crashed and exploded in hilly terrain. The remains of both aviators were recovered and CAPTAIN WHITE rests in peace at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. CAPTAIN MORTON, a distinguished graduate of Texas A&M, is memorialized on the Corps Plaza Memorial and is buried at the Air Force Academy Cemetery in Colorado Springs.





IV. HUMBLE HOST END NOTE: The New York Times, 3 August 1969, Opinion Editorial, page 46: I quote…

NIXON'S ASIAN DOCTRINE

"American postwar policy in Asia undoubtedly will be shaped in large degree by the experience in Vietnam, the peace settlement achieved there and the situation in Southeast Asia that then emerges. But conversely, the effort to define American peace objectives in Vietnam–and to convince the Communist powers that an accommodation is feasible–demands a clear concept of true American interests in Asia and the more limited role the United States in the future will want to play there, particularly in the military field.

"The reduced military role that President Nixon foresees in the postwar period would bring the American strategic posture back to a more traditional form. The United States is, by definition, a Pacific power. It has long held island outposts near the rim of Asia. But that is not the same as being an Asian power. Nor is American air and sea supremacy over the Pacific and much of Asia the equivalent of a ground capability against Asia's mass armies or guerrilla fighters. Traditional American military doctrine has rightly sought to avoid large-scale land warfare on the Asian continent. The United States will neither be 'running out on Asia' nor heading toward isolationism if, in the postwar period, it limits its commitments and involvements to a more sober assessment of its capabilities than was made by President Johnson.

"The pattern President Nixon has sketched during his current Asian travels conforms to the treaty commitments he has insisted the United States will honor. Neither the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization nor any other formal commitment obligates the United States to contribute combat troops to resist internal subversion or guerrilla insurgency, even if Communist-inspired. Nor is the United States obligated, when external invasions are involved, to take the primary role in defending nations that are incapable–either through military deficiency or socio-political flaws–of mobilizing themselves for self-defense.

"'Peace and progress in Asia must be shaped and protected primarily by Asian hands' and the American contribution 'should come as a supplement to Asian energies and in response to Asian leadership,' Mr. Nixon said at Manilla airport. Another of his major themes was that the American stake in Asian stability can often be better furthered by economic rather than military aid.

"This is the American policy favored by the leaders of Indonesia who have set an example for Asians in defending themselves without outside aid against Communist subversion. Filipinos support the concept. So do the Thais. And even in a beleaguered South Vietnam the nation's military leaders have recognized that Vietnamization of the war and the gradual withdrawal of American ground combat troops is the right course to follow.

"Mr. Nixon's doctrine is neither new nor remarkable. Yet the Johnson aberration in converting South Vietnam's war from 'their war,' as President Kennedy described it, to 'ours' gives Mr. Nixon's restatement of the traditional American approach the character of a great divide in policy. It responds to the American desire for no more Vietnams. It provides reassurance for Asians that American withdrawal from a land war on the continent does not terminate American interest in and aid for Asians.

"And, perhaps most important, it signals to Hanoi, Peking and Moscow that the United States seeks a strategic accommodation for Asia as a whole for which Vietnam could well set the pattern."…. End Quote…



HUMBLE HOST STINGER: Humble Host respectfully suggests our President take notes from this astute conclusion and the "Nixon Doctrine." No more Afghanistans. No more conversions of "their war" to "our war."… No more attempts to establish democracy where centuries of history tell us it cannot be done… Our President needs to formulate and declare a "Trump Doctrine" that reflects the bloody lessons of our repeated entanglements in foreign fights, including Vietnam and Afghanistan (and Syria, Iraq, etc…)… OR, call it "THE END OF ENDLESS WARS DOCTRINE."… the rationale remains the same…

Lest we forget… Bear



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This Day in Aviation History" brought to you by the Daedalians Airpower Blog Update. To subscribe to this weekly email, go to https://daedalians.org/airpower-blog/



Oct. 20, 1911

The world's first military airplane – the 1909 Wright Military Flyer – was presented to the Smithsonian. It is on display at the Early Flight exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Learn more HERE.

Oct. 21, 1942

Eight men including World War I ace, Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, USAAC (Ret.), crashed in a B-17D Flying Fortress, in the Central Pacific as a result of a navigational error while Rickenbacker toured Allied forces in the Pacific. At one point, Sgt. Alexander Kaczmarczyk, USAAF, died and the castaways buried him at sea. On Nov. 12, Lt. j.g. F. E. Woodward and ARM2 L. H. Boutte flying a Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher of VS-1 Detachment 14, spotted a life raft containing the pilot of the Flying Fortress, Capt. William T. Cherry Jr., USAAF. A patrol torpedo boat rescued him. The next day, Lt. William F. Eadie and Boutte crewed the same Kingfisher and spotted the raft carrying Rickenbacker; Capt. Hans C. Adamson, USAAF; and Pvt. John F. Bartek, USAAF; off Nukufetau in the Ellice Islands (Tuvalu). Eadie landed the Kingfisher, rescued the three men, and taxied 40 miles to the nearest land. The Navy later rescued the other three survivors. Rickenbacker was Daedalian Founder Member #169.

Oct. 22, 1951

Two 3rd Air Rescue Squadron SA-16s rescued a 12-man crew of a downed B-29, the highest number rescued by SA-16s on any day in the Korean War.

Oct. 23, 1951

Col. Michael N. McCoy, the 306th BMW commander, flew SAC's first operational Boeing B-47 (No. 50-008) to his wing at MacDill AFB, Florida. In a ceremony Nov. 19, the B-47 received the name, "The Real McCoy."

Oct. 24, 1964

First Lt. Valmore Bourque, U.S. Air Force Academy Class of '60, became the first graduate to die in combat. He was killed when his C-123B was struck by ground fire over Cambodia and crashed. Bourque was promoted to captain posthumously. His name appears on the War Memorial on the Academy Terrazzo, and his statue stands in the Mall of Heroes between Fairchild and Vandenberg Halls. Coincidentally, on July 11, 1955, he was the first person to be sworn in as an Air Force Academy cadet.

Oct. 25, 1911

Navy Lts. Theodore G. Ellyson and John H. Towers flew A-1 (later AH-1) during an experiment to test the plane's durability on a cross-country flight from Annapolis, Md., to Fort Monroe, Va. A leaking radiator forced the aircraft down near Milford Haven, Va., after covering 112 miles in 122 minutes. This flight began a 10-day struggle to make the round trip. Ellyson was Daedalian Founder Member #4377; Towers was #4093.

Oct. 26, 1909

After instruction from Wilbur Wright, Lt. Frederick E. Humphreys and Lt. Frank P. Lahm became the first Army officers to solo in a Wright airplane at College Park, Maryland. Humphreys was Daedalian Founder Member #1433 and Lahm, #211.



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Thanks to Dick

Flying boats--long but impressive

From my friend, Gary.
Subject: Flying boats--long but impressive



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y22F9O3A0EM



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