Wednesday, October 9, 2019

TheList 5115


The List 5115 TGB

To All,

I hope that your week has started well. Not sure what happened to 5114 yesterday and it was resent this morning.

Regards,

Skip
Today in Naval History

October 8

1812 During the War of 1812, a boat party under Lt. Jesse D. Elliott captures HMS Detroit and Caledonia at Fort Erie in a night attack. Detroit is burned and Caledonia is purchased by the U.S. Navy in 1813 and placed in commission as USS Caledonia.

1842 Commodore Lawrence Kearny, commanding the East Indian Squadron, sends a letter to the Viceroy of China urging American merchants in China be granted the same treaty privileges as the British. As a result of his letter, Chinese ports are opened to American ships. These agreements are formalized by Caleb Cushing in the Treaty of Wangxia in 1844.

1915 Light cruiser Chester (CL 1) transports British, French, and Russian refugees to Alexandria in Egypt from Jaffa, Israel.

1943 USS Guardfish (SS 217) sinks Japanese army cargo ship Kashu Maru north-northwest of the Admiralty Islands while USS Gurnard (SS 254) sinks the Japanese army cargo ship Taian Maru and transport ship Dainichi Maru off the northern tip of Luzon.

1955 The sixth USS Saratoga (CV 60) is launched. In 1972, she is reclassified as a multi-purpose aircraft carrier and receives the designation (CV-60). After nearly 40 years in service, Saratoga is decommissioned in 1994.

1960 The third USS Constellation (CVA 64) is launched. In 1975, she is reclassified as a multi-purpose aircraft carrier and receives the designation (CV 64). In 2003, Constellation is decommissioned.

1990 Two Marine UH‑1N Iroquois disappear with eight men during routine night training operations from the amphibious assault ship USS Okinawa (LPH 3) in the Gulf of Oman.



Thanks to CHINFO

Executive Summary:

• Coverage continued on the Trump administration's decision to withdraw U.S. forces from Syria and support Turkish control along the Turkey-Syria border.

• The Associated Press provided an overview of recent developments in the South China Sea.

• USNI News reported on first week of the Navy's new Chief Learning Officer John Kroger.

• Multiple outlets covered the F/A-18C Hornet's final flight out of Naval Station Norfolk as the V-22 Osprey exceeded 500,000 flight hours in service.



Today in History October 8




876




Charles the Bald is defeated at the Battle of Andernach.


1690




Belgrade is retaken by the Turks.


1840




King William I of Holland abdicates.


1855




Arrow, a ship flying the British flag, is boarded by Chinese who arrest the crew, thus beginning the Second Chinese War.


1862




The Union is victorious at the Battle of Perryville, the largest Civil War combat to take place in Kentucky.


1871




The Great Chicago Fire begins in southwest Chicago, possibly in a barn owned by Patrick and Katherine O'Leary. Fanned by strong southwesterly winds, the flames raged for more than 24 hours, eventually leveling three and a half square miles and wiping out one-third of the city. Approximately 250 people were killed in the fire; 98,500 people were left homeless; 17,450 buildings were destroyed.


1897




Journalist Charles Henry Dow, founder of the Wall Street Journal, begins charting trends of stocks and bonds.


1900




Maximilian Harden is sentenced to six months in prison for publishing an article critical of the German Kaiser.


1906




Karl Ludwig Nessler first demonstrates a machine in London that puts permenant waves in hair. The client wears a dozen brass curlers, each wearing two pounds, for the six-hour process.


1912




First Balkan War begins as Montenegro declares war against the Ottoman Empire.


1918




US Army corporal Alvin C. York kills 28 German soldiers and captures 132 in the Argonne Forest; promoted to sergeant and awarded US Medal of Honor and French Croix de Guerre.


1919




The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives pass the Volstead Prohibition Enforcement Bill.


1921




First live radio broadcast of a football game; Harold W. Arlin was the announcer when KDKA of Pittsburgh broadcast live from Forbes Field as the University of Pittsburgh beat West Virginia University 21–13.


1922




Lilian Gatlin becomes the first woman pilot to fly across the United States.


1932




Indian Air Force established.


1939




Nazi Germany annexes Western Poland.


1956




Don Larsen of the New York Yankees pitches the first perfect game in World Series history against the Brooklyn Dodgers.


1967




Guerrilla Che Guevara captured in Bolivia.


1968




U.S. forces in Vietnam launch Operation SEALORDS (South East Asia Lake, Ocean, River and Delta Strategy), an attack on communist supply lines and base areas in and around the Mekong Delta.


1969




The "Days of Rage" begin in Chicago; the Weathermen faction of the Students for a Democratic Society initiate 3 days of violent antiwar protests.


1973




In the Yom Kippur War an Israeli armored brigade makes an unsuccessful attack on Egyptian positions on the Israeli side of the Suez Canal.


1978




Ken Warby of Australia sets the world water speed record, 317.60 mph, at Blowering Dam in Australia; no other human has yet (2013) exceeded 300 mph on water and survived.


1982




The musical Cats begins a run of nearly 18 years on Broadway.


1991




Croatia votes to sever its ties with Yugoslavia.


2001




US President George W. Bush establishes the Office of Homeland Security.




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Thanks to Al

Monday Morning Humor--Navy Football

Navy played Air Force on Saturday with good results.

Submitted by Dave Harris:



Siri knew how the USNA vs USAFA was going to turn out at https://www.military.com/video/forces/navy/siri-stars-in-hilarious-usna-spirit-spot/3816105756001



Once there was a season when the Navy and Army football teams were not scheduled to play each other. It seemed so unusual, that the coaches of both academies got together and decided that there should be some sort of competition between the two teams because of their great rivalry.
They decided on a week-long ice-fishing competition. The team who caught the most fish at the end of the week would win. So on a cold northern South Dakota lake (a neutral site so no one would whine about home field advantage), they began their contest.
The first day, after eight hours of fishing, Navy had caught 100 fish and Army had none. At the end of the second day, Navy had caught 200 fish and Army had none.
That evening the Army coach got his team together and said, "I suspect some kind of cheating is taking place."
The next morning he dressed one of his players in blue and white and sent him over to the camp to act as a spy. At the end of the day, the spy came back to report to the coach.
The coach asked, "Well, how about it, are they cheating?"
"They sure are," the Army player reported, "They're cutting holes in the ice!"



The Air Force coach gave his football team a few days off. Several decided to go down to Panama City, Florida, for fun and relaxation. The coach saw the players the first day back at practice and asked about their vacation.
"Not good coach," said the players. "We never made it to the beach."
"Why not," the coach asked, "car trouble?"
"No," they replied, "every few miles down the interstate we saw signs that said, 'Exit, Clean Restrooms.' And you have no idea how many restrooms we cleaned between Colorado Springs and Panama City!"



Air Force is playing Army, which has a first down with three minutes left in the half. An Army fan sets off a firecracker, and Air Force, thinking it's the end of the half, runs off the field. Three plays later, Army punts.



The Annapolis grad walked into the bar, sat down and said, "Hey barkeep, you hear the joke about the four West Point players in a farmhouse?"
Chairs scraped behind him, and four of the biggest, meanest guys in the bar stood up. "We played for Army. You sure you wanna tell that joke?"
The Navy grad smirked in disbelief and said, "What, and have to explain it four times?"



An Air Force football player was almost killed in a tragic horseback riding accident. He fell from the horse and was nearly trampled to death. Thank goodness the manager of the K-Mart came out and unplugged it.



Q: How come the Air Force football team doesn't have a website?
A: They can't string three "W's" together.





Go Navy!

Al

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Thanks to John

The article on the Misty FAC's was great. I've attached a few articles from Larry Adkinson on the Marine Playboy FAC's.

John

See the attachments

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Thanks to Carl…I think every time we turn around someone has a better way to keep track of us. I wonder how many of the other ones we have been told about over the last few years are being used right now???

Forget Facial Recognition: DHS's New Database, HART, Also Uses Scars, Tattoos - LewRockwell

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2019/10/daisy-luther/forget-facial-recognition-dhss-new-database-hart-also-uses-scars-tattoos-and-your-voice-to-id-you-and-amazon-is-storing-all-the-data/



Forget Facial Recognition: DHS's New Database, HART, Also Uses Scars, Tattoos, and Your VOICE to ID You. And Amazon Is Storing All the Data.

By Daisy Luther - The Organic Prepper

October 7, 2019



These days, you can't really go anywhere without encountering cameras. Going into a store? Chances are there are security cameras. Getting money at an ATM? More cameras. Driving through the streets of a city? More cameras still. Your neighbors may have those doorbells from Amazon that are surveilling the entire neighborhood.

And many of these cameras are tied into facial recognition databases, or the footage can be quite easily compared there if "authorities" are looking for somebody.

But as it turns out, it isn't just facial recognition we have to worry about.

DHS has a new recognition system called HART.

Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology system is the alarming new identity system being put in place by the Department of Homeland Security.

DHS is retiring its old system that was based on facial recognition. It's being replaced with HART, a cloud-based system that holds information about the identities of hundreds of millions of people.

The new cloud-based platform, called the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology System, or HART, is expected to bring more processing power, new analytics capabilities and increased accuracy to the department's biometrics operations. It will also allow the agency to look beyond the three types of biometric data it uses today—face, iris and fingerprint—to identify people through a variety of other characteristics, like palm prints, scars, tattoos, physical markings and even their voices. (source)

Incidentally, the cloud hosting for HART is being done by none other than Amazon – you know, the ones with surveillance devices like the Ring doorbell and the Alexa home assistant and the Nest home security system. Does anyone see a pattern here?

Also note that Amazon Web Services also hosts data for the CIA, the DoD, and NASA.

More about HART

As HART becomes more established, that old saying "you can run but you can't hide" is going to seem ever more true. The DHS is delighted at how much further the new system can take them into surveilling Americans.

And by freeing the agency from the limitations of its legacy system, HART could also let officials grow the network of external partners with whom they share biometric data and analytics capabilities, according to Patrick Nemeth, director of identity operations within Homeland Security's Office of Biometric Identity Management.

"When we get to HART, we will be better, faster, stronger," Nemeth said in an interview with Nextgov. "We'll be relieved of a lot of the capacity issues that we have now … and then going forward from there we'll be able to add [capabilities]." (source)

The DHS wants to break free of the limitations of the old system with their new and "improved" system. HART will use multiple pieces of biometric data to increase identification accuracy.

Today, when an official runs a person's face, fingerprint or iris scans through IDENT's massive database, the system doesn't return a single result. Rather, it assembles a list of dozens of potential candidates with different levels of confidence, which a human analyst must then look through to make a final match. The system can only handle one modality at a time, so if agent is hypothetically trying to identify someone using two different datapoints, they need to assess two lists of candidates to find a single match. This isn't a problem if the system identifies the same person as the most likely match for both fingerprint and face, for example, but because biometric identification is still an imperfect science, the results are rarely so clear cut.

However, the HART platform can include multiple datapoints in a single query, meaning it will rank potential matches based on all the information that's available. That will not only make it easier for agents to analyze potential matches, but it will also help the agency overcome data quality issues that often plague biometric scans, Nemeth said. If the face image is pristine but the fingerprint is fuzzy, for example, the system will give the higher-quality datapoint more weight.

"We're very hopeful that it will provide better identification surety than we can provide with any single modality today," Nemeth said. And palm prints, scars, tattoos and other modalities are added in the years ahead, the system will be able to integrate those into its matching process. (source)

HART will also use DNA.

Remember a while back when we reported that DNA sites were teaming up with facial recognition software? Well, HART will take that unholy alliance even further.

The phase-two solicitation also lists DNA-matching as a potential application of the HART system. While the department doesn't currently analyze DNA, officials on Wednesday announced they would start adding DNA collected from hundreds of thousands of detained migrants to the FBI's criminal database. During the interview, Nemeth said the agency is still working through the legal implications of storing and sharing such sensitive data. It's also unclear whether DNA information would be housed in the HART system or a separate database, he said. (source)

Nifty.

The DHS is operating without any type of regulation.

Currently, there's no regulation or oversight of government agencies collecting and using this kind of data. Civil liberty activists and some lawmakers are alarmed by this, citing concerns about privacy and discrimination. This hasn't slowed down the DHS one iota, however.

Critics have taken particular issue with the government's tangled web of information sharing agreements, which allow data to spread far beyond the borders of the agency that collected it. The Homeland Security Department currently shares its biometric data and capabilities with numerous groups, including but not limited to the Justice, Defense and State departments.

In the years ahead, HART promises to strengthen those partnerships and allow others to flourish, according to Nemeth. While today the department limits other agencies' access to IDENT to ensure they don't consume too much of its limited computing power, HART will do away with those constraints. (source)

Mana Azarmi, the policy counsel for the Freedom, Security and Technology Project at the Center for Democracy and Technology is one of those people voicing concern.

A person might give information to a single agency thinking it would be used for one specific purpose, but depending on how that information is shared, they could potentially find themselves subjected to unforeseen negative consequences, Azarmi said in a conversation with Nextgov.

"The government gets a lot of leeway to share information," she said. "In this age of incredible data collection, I think we need to rethink some of the rules that are in place and some of the practices that we've allowed to flourish post-9/11. We may have overcorrected." (source)

You think?

Many people voluntarily provide biometric data.

Many folks provide biometric data without giving it a second thought. They cheerfully swab a cheek and send it into sites like Ancestry.com, providing not only their DNA, but matches to many relatives who never gave permission for their DNA to be in a database.

Then there are cell phones. If you have a newer phone, it's entirely possible that it has asked you to set up fingerprint login, facial recognition, and even voice recognition. It isn't a stretch of the imagination to believe that those samples are shared with folks beyond the device in your hand. Add to this that your device is tracking you every place you go through a wide variety of seemingly innocuous apps, and you start to get the picture.

You can't opt-out.

Back in 2013, I wrote an article called The Great American Dragnet. At that time, facial recognition was something that sounded like science fiction or some kind of joke. Our drivers' licenses were the first foray into creating a database but even in 2013, it far exceeded that.

Another, even larger, database exists. The US State Department has a database with 230 million searchable images. Anyone with a passport or an immigration visa may find themselves an unwilling participant in this database. Here's the breakdown of who has a photo database:

The State Department has about 15 million photos of passport or visa holders

The FBI has about15 million photos of people who have been arrested or convicted of crimes

The Department of Defense has about 6 million photos, mainly of Iraqis and Afghans

Various police agencies and states have at least 210 million driver's license photos

This invasion of privacy is just another facet of the surveillance state, and should be no surprise considering the information Edward Snowden just shared about the over-reaching tentacles of the NSA into all of our communications. We are filing our identities with the government and they can identify us at will, without any requirement for probable cause. (source)

Some people don't even seem to mind that their identities have been tagged and filed by the US government. And even those of us who do mind have no option. If you wish to drive a car or travel outside of the country or have any kind of government ID, like it or not, you're in the database. Six years ago, I wrote:

The authorities that use this technology claim that the purpose of it is to make us safer, by helping to prevent identity fraud and to identify criminals. However, what freedom are we giving up for this "safety" cloaked in benevolence? We are giving up the freedom of having the most elemental form of privacy – that of being able to go about our daily business without being watched and identified. And once you're identified, this connects to all sorts of other personal information that has been compiled: your address, your driving and criminal records, and potentially, whatever else that has been neatly filed away at your friendly neighborhood fusion center.

Think about it: You're walking the dog and you fail to scoop the poop – if there's a surveillance camera in the area, it would be a simple matter, given the technology, for you to be identified. If you are attending a protest that might be considered "anti-government", don't expect to be anonymous. A photo of the crowd could easily result in the identification of most of the participants.

Are you purchasing ammo, preparedness items, or books about a controversial topic? Paying cash won't buy you much in the way of privacy – your purchase will most likely be captured on the CCTV camera at the checkout stand, making you easily identifiable to anyone who might wish to track these kinds of things. What if a person with access to this technology uses it for personal, less than ethical reasons, like stalking an attractive women he saw on the street? The potential for abuse is mind-boggling.

If you can't leave your house without being identified, do you have any real freedom left, or are you just a resident in a very large cage? (source)

When I wrote that, it still seemed far-fetched but remotely possible, even to me. This was before we were really aware of anything like the social credit program in China or how crazy the censorship was going to become or how social media would change the very fabric of our society.

Now, it's here and it looks like there's no stopping it.



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Greatest White Crime in History?

thanks to Doctor Rich



And nothing happens to these crooks!! Let's hope Barr has the cojones to go after them …



There are those who refuse to believe just how crooked these people were, but ignoring this by any of us is the problem.



Hey, Nadler how about investigating this!!



Investors Business Daily did an article on this and it confirms the Clinton Foundation has closed its doors.

A Charitable Foundation Folds !

Have you wondered why the Clinton Foundation folded so suddenly after Hillary was no longer in a position of influence?





Perhaps this summary will provide some insight?

From their 2014 990 Tax Form; they list 486 employees (line 5)! It took 486 people who are paid $34.8 million and $91.3 million in fees and expenses, to give away $5.1 MILLION

The real heart of the Clintons can be seen here. Staggering but notsurprising. These figures are from an official copy of the Bill,
Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation for the tax year 2014. The copy of the tax return is from the National Center for Charitable
Statistics web site http://nccs.urban.org/You can obtain the latest tax return on any charitable organization there.

The Clinton Foundation: Number of Employees (line 5) 486
Total revenue (line 12): $177,804,612.00
Total grants to charity (line 13) $5,160,385.00 (this is less than 3%)
Total expenses of $91,281,145.00




Expenses include:
Salaries (line 15) $34,838,100
Fund raising fees (line 16a) $850,803.00
Other expenses (line 17) $50,431,851.00 HUH??????

Travel: $8,000,000.00
Note: $20 Million in Travel & Meetings to decide who gets the $5.160 Million in Charity ?
Meetings: $12,000,000.00

Net assets/fund balances (line 22) $332,471,349.00... So it required 486 people, who were paid $34.8 million, plus $91.3 million in fees
and expenses, to give away $5.1 MILLION! And they call this a CHARITY?

It is alleged that this is one of the greatest white-collar crimes ever committed. And just think one of the participants was a former president and one (gasp!) wanted to be elected president of the United States.


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French Concorde crash cover up.

Thanks to DR

Fascinating.

Can we not endure one full day without direct evidence of cover-up, collusion, and criminal, gross misconduct?

Apologize is line breaks are inconvenient.

DR

From: Kevork Hashas

Very interesting.....

From: Robert Livingstone Subject: French Concorde crash cover up.

The provider of this is at the end.

Hello All,

The following is from Facebook. I believe it was a lecture last night at the Royal Air Force Museum in the UK. A very interesting read:-

The RAeS lecture by Concorde pilot John Hutchinson last night was fascinating and astonishing. He presented clear evidence that the French authorities, who conducted the crash investigation, covered up the true cause and tried to blame Continental airways engineers and design weaknesses in Concorde. The truth is that Air France was totally to blame. Firstly their maintenance procedures were extremely poor.

During an undercarriage service a spacer, that kept the wheels tracking straight, was not replaced. The spacer was later found on the shelf in the maintenance hangar. The aircraft had done four flights with this defect prior to the crash so it wasn't the prime cause, but as with all accidents there were a number of other errors that all added up.

This may have been another successful flight had the crew not of had such a cavalier attitude to flight safety. The first officer's licence had expired making the flight illegal. This wasn't a factor in the crash but demonstrates the unprofessional attitude in Air France.

The main fault lies with the Captain who overrode procedure and ordered the tanks to be filled to the brim instead of the normal 80%. He ordered more fuel than was required to be put in the aft tanks used for taxiing. He allowed 19 bags, that had not been weighed, to be loaded in the aft hold. All this made the aircraft over weight and the CofG out of limits.

Presumably due to the weight and balance being out of limits he requested to use the runway extension, even though it was officially out of use because it was being re-surfaced. He also elected to take off with an 8 kt tail wind. The French investigations verdict was that the crash was caused by a metal strap falling off a Continental airways DC10 onto the runway which burst a tyre, punctured the Concordes fuel tank starting a fire.

What really happened was that as the aircraft accelerated over the unprepared part of the runway it hit a ledge as it crossed onto the prepared surface at about 100kt. This caused the wheels to track to the left as they had no spacer to constrain them.

The tyres overheated and burst starting the fire. The aircraft slewed off the runway to the left, hit a runway light and the metal strap which carved a piece of tyre off which was then thrown up into the wing tank setting up a shock wave. As the tank was full there was nowhere for it to go other than out through the top of the wing streaming fuel into the engine efflux. The engine overheated but wasn't on fire and was still producing power.

The flight engineer ignored normal procedure and shut the engine down. As the aircraft was past V2 he should have allowed the aircraft to gain height before doing that. All this contributed to the aircraft crashing into a hotel killing all 109 on board and 4 people in the hotel. The death toll could have been a lot worse. As the Concorde was careering off the runway it missed a fully loaded 747 waiting for permission to cross, by just 20 feet.

On board that aircraft was the President of France and his wife. In addition to that a British youth orchestra had planned to stay in the hotel. Had it not been for their ferry being delayed they would have checked in and certainly perished as well. What makes the French authorities actions even worse was that they obstructed the UKs AAIB investigation, not allowing full and timely access to the crash site and certain evidence.

The French prosecuted the Continental Airways engineers for manslaughter and they unfairly blamed design weaknesses in Concorde. The engineers were later acquitted on appeal, and this is where much of the hidden evidence came to light. After the trial the French barrister, who successfully defended the engineers, was mysteriously found dead but the French didn't hold an inquest into that.

A disgraceful chain of events that eventually led to Air France, who wanted to see Concorde grounded, putting pressure on Airbus, who were the design authority for Concorde, to increase their charges to British Airways. This was a deliberate act to make the aircraft too expensive to operate and resulted in an unjustifiable slur on the reputation of one of the greatest aircraft ever to fly. Thanks for John Hutchinson for revealing the truth and the shame on the French for allowing this to happen.

Regards Peter Dunn
"Australia @ War"
www.ozatwar.com



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