Monday, June 10, 2019

TheList 5018




The List 5018 TG 
 
I hope that you all have a great weekend. 
Regards,
  1. skip
  2.  
  3. Today in Naval History
  4. June 7
  5.  
  6. 1898
  7. During the Spanish-American War, USS Marblehead (C 11), along with auxiliary cruisers USS Yankee and USS St. Louis, engage the Spanish gunboat Sandoval and the shore batteries at Guantanamo, Cuba for 2 1/2 hours.
  8. 1917
  9. During World War I, U.S. submarine chasers arrive at Corfu, Greece, for anti-submarine patrols.
  10. 1942
  11. Just after dawn, USS Yorktown (CV 5) sinks after being torpedoed the previous day by Japanese submarine (I 168).
  12. 1944
  13. The construction of artificial harbors and sheltered anchorages, also known as Mulberries, begins off the Normandy coast.
  14. 1944
  15. USS Mingo (SS 261) torpedoes and sinks Japanese destroyer Tamanami, 150 miles west-southwest of Manila while USS Skate (SS 305) attacks a Japanese convoy in the southern Sea of Okhotsk and sinks destroyer Usugumo, 160 miles north of Etorofu, Kuril Islands. Additionally, USS Sunfish (SS 281) attacks Japanese fishing boats en route from Matsuwa to Uruppu, Kuril Islands, shelling and sinking No.105 Hokuyo Maru, No.5 Kannon Maru, Ebisu Maru, and Kinei Maru while USS Flasher (SS 249) sinks Japanese transport No.2 Koto Maru off Cape Varella, French Indochina. Lastly, USS Bonefish (SS 223) shells and sinks Japanese guardboat Ryuei Maru at the mouth of Tarakan Harbor, Borneo.
  16. 1945
  17. During the Okinawa Campaign, while serving with the Third Marine Battalion, Twenty-Ninth Marines, Sixth Marine Division, Pvt. Robert M. McTureous's company suffers casualties after capturing a hill on Oroku Peninsula, and the wounded can't be evacuated due to heavy Japanese fire. Waging a one-man assault to redirect enemy fire away from the wounded, McTureous attacks numerous times and suffers severe wounds in the process. He crawls 200 yards back to safety before asking for aid. His actions confuse the enemy and enable his company to complete its mission. He dies on June 11 on board USS Relief. For his "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" on this occasion, McTureous is posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.
  18.  
  19. Today in Naval History
  20. June 8
  21.  
  22. 1830
  23. The sloop of war USS Vincennes becomes the first US Navy warship to circle the globe when she returns to New York. She departs on Sept. 3, 1826, rounds Cape Horn and cruises the Pacific protecting American merchantmen and whalers until June 1829.
  24. 1937
  25. Capt. Julius F. Hellweg commands the Navy detachment that observes a total eclipse of the sun.
  26. 1943
  27. TBF aircraft from USS Bogue (ACV 9) damage German submarine (U 758) west by south of the Canary Islands.
  28. 1943
  29. USS Finback (SS 230) attacks a Japanese convoy and sinks auxiliary minelayer Kahoku Maru about 100 miles north of Palau.
  30. 1959
  31. The Navy and the Post Office deliver the first official missile mail when USS Barbero (SS-317) fires a Regulus I missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla., to Mayport, Fla.
  32. 1996
  33. USS Cole (DDG 67) is commissioned at Port Everglade, Fla. The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer is named after Medal of Honor recipient Marine Sgt. Darrell S. Cole, a machine-gunner killed in action during action on Iwo Jima Feb. 19, 1945.
  34. 1996
  35. USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) is commissioned. The Harpers Ferry-class dock landing ship is the second named to honor the home of President James Monroe, where he penned the Monroe Doctrine.
  36.  
  37. Today in Naval History
  38. June 9
  39.  
  40. 1813
  41. During the War of 1812, the frigate, President, commanded by John Rodgers, is en route between the Azores and England when it begins a series of captures of British vessels that include the brig Kitty, the packet brig Duke of Montrose, the brig Maria, and the schooner Falcon.
  42. 1869
  43. Secretary of the Navy Adolph E. Borie, orders the construction of the first torpedo station on Goat Island, Newport, R.I. Cmdr. Edmund O. Matthews is the first Commanding Officer. During the establishment, the station experiments with torpedoes and trained sailors in the use of the weapons.
  44. 1882
  45. The Office of Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion (which later becomes part of the Naval History and Heritage Command) is established. The office is placed under the direction of James R. Soley, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy in the 1890s.
  46. 1944
  47. During her Fifth War Patrol, USS Harder (SS 257) sinks Japanese destroyer Tanikaze in the Sibitu Passage, about 90 miles southwest of Basilan Island. On June 6, she sinks the Japanese destroyer Minazuki 120 miles east-northeast of Tarakan, Borneo. On June 7, Harder sinks the Japanese destroyer Hayanami south of the Japanese fleet anchorage at Tawi Tawi, southeast of the Sibitu Passage, Borneo. On the morning of Aug. 24, Harder is sunk in Dasol Bay, Philippines, by enemy depth charges on its Sixth War Patrol. There are no survivors and the crew is never recovered. For his "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity " in sinking the Japanese destroyers during the Fifth War Patrol, Cmdr. Samuel D. Dealey, Harders CO, is posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.
  48. 1959
  49. USS George Washington (SSBN 598), the first U.S. Navy nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine, is christened and launched at Groton, Conn. Her nuclear capability is removed in 1983, and she is classified as SSN 598 serving until 1985. USS George Washington is later processed in the nuclear recycling program at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in 1998.
  50. 2007
  51. USS Kidd (DDG 100) is commissioned at Galveston, Texas. The 49th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is named after Rear Adm. Isaac C. Kidd, who was killed in action onboard USS Arizona during the Japanese Navys attack on Pearl Harbor. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.
  52.  
  53. Thanks to CHINFO
  54. Executive Summary:
  55. •             Early reporting today from C7F details an unsafe interaction between USS Chancellorsville and a Russian Destroyer in the Philippine Sea. This is the second unsafe and in professional action by the Russian military this week.
  56. •             On the 75th anniversary of D-Day, Adm. James Foggo spoke at a dedication ceremony for a Lone Sailor statue honoring D-Day frogmen reports Stars and Stripes. "The Lone Sailor monument represents all these sailors and Marines that lost their lives at sea — and what they have given to us," said Adm. Foggo. "Victory in Europe would not have been possible without the determination and sacrifice of those sailors, soldiers and Marines here on Utah Beach, 75 years ago today."
  57. •             Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer named future Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer, DDG 132, in honor of Coast Guard Capt. Quentin Walsh, who was awarded the Navy Cross for his service during World War II.
  58. •             The Wall Street Journal detailed how two Iranian commercial boats armed with missiles in the Persian Gulf escalated tensions between the United States and Iran last month.
  59.  
  60.  
  61. Today in History June 7
  1. 1498

  1. Christopher Columbus leaves on his third voyage of exploration.
  1. 1546

  1. The Peace of Ardes ends the war between France and England.
  1. 1654

  1. Louis XIV is crowned king of France.
  1. 1712

  1. The Pennsylvania Assembly bans the importation of slaves.
  1. 1767

  1. Daniel Boone sights present-day Kentucky.
  1. 1775

  1. The United Colonies change their name to the United States.
  1. 1863

  1. Mexico City is captured by French troops.
  1. 1900

  1. The Boxer rebels cut the rail links between Peking and Tientsin in China.
  1. 1903

  1. Professor Pierre Curie reveals the discovery of Polonium.
  1. 1914

  1. The first vessel passes through the Panama Canal.
  1. 1932

  1. Over 7,000 war veterans march on Washington, D.C., demanding their bonus pay for service in World War I.
  1. 1942

  1. The Japanese invade Attu and Kiska in the Aleutian Islands.
  1. 1968

  1. In Operation Swift Saber, U.S. Marines sweep an area 10 miles northwest of Da Nang in South Vietnam.
  1. 1981

  1. Israeli F-16 fighter-bombers destroy Iraq's only nuclear reactor.
  1. 1994

  1. The Organization of African Unity formally admits South Africa as its fifty-third member.
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  3.  
  4. Close-in fire support for the infantry at Omaha Beach was terribly lacking until...US Navy destroyers "saved the day".

    As many of you know, a massive German slaughter house awaited US troops at Omaha Beach.

    June 6, 1944, at H-hour 0630 real trouble started. Landing craft coxswains lost their bearings in the early morning mist, deepened by smoke and dust kicked up by the naval bombardment. Many of them missed their assigned landing sectors. Of the 64 DD tanks (amphibious) 27 made it to the Dog beaches but only five got ashore on Easy beaches; the rest foundered on the way in.

    0830 USS Carmick breaks the cease-fire order that had suspended supporting naval gunfire at H-hour. (Some 1 & 1/2 to 2 hrs of withering German cliff-top defensive firing w/o much, if any, U.S return fire support at all.) 1st and 29th Division assault waves - sitting ducks.

    USS Carmick action report:
    ..."Early in the morning a group of tanks were seen to be having difficulty making their way along the breakwater road toward Exit D-1 [the Vierville draw]. A silent coorporation was established wherein they fired at a target on the bluff above them and we then fired several salvos at the same spot. They then shifted fire further along the bluff and we used their bursts again as a point of aim."...
    Captain Sanders, COMDESTRON 18 Commander was in the USS Frankfort, arriving off the beachhead just before 0900. Concerned about increasing casualties on the beach, he ordered ALL destroyers to close on the beach as far in as possible and support the assault troops.

    Close-in fire support by navy destroyers speeded up much improved conditions all along the beach at Omaha by 1000.

    After action report: (personal letter from Sergeant James E. Knight of the 299th Combat Engineer Battalion wrote to the crew of the USS Frankfort)..."There is no question, at least in my mind, if you had not come in as close as you did, exposing yourself to God only knows how much, that I would not have survived the night. I truly believe that in the absence of the damage you inflicted on German emplacements, the only way any GI was going to leave Omaha was in a mattress cover or as a prisoner of war."...Sergeant Barton Davis, 299th Combat Engineer Battalion wrote to say: " How well I remember your ship coming in so close. I thought then as I do now that it was one brave thing to come in so close...Your ship not only knocked out the pillbox but the mortar positions above us...I always thought how great it would be to tell the Captain of this ship how grateful I am..." ( a personal letter to Captain James Semmes, CO of the USS Frankfort).

    Colonel S.B. Mason, USA, Chief of Staff of the 1st Division, wrote the following letter to Rear Admiral Hall after an inspection of the German defenses at Omaha. They should have been impregnable" "But there was one element of attack they could not parry...I am now firmly convinced that our supporting naval fire got us in; that without that gunfire we positively could not have crossed the beaches."...

    Almost scraping the bottom with destroyer keels off Omaha Beach were the: USS Frankfort; USS McCook; USS Doyle; USS Thompson; USS Carmick...D-Day - June 6th, 1944.

    Footnote:

    In his book, "The Longest Day", Cornelius Ryan so described German defenses of Omaha. The German 352nd Division's artillery batteries were only a part of what Ryan called "the deadly guns of Omaha Beach":
    There were 8 concrete bunkers with guns of 75 millimeters or larger caliber [75mm to 88mm]; 35 pillbox ea with artillery pieces of various sizes/or automatic weapons; 4 batteries of artillery [presumably Pluskat's]; 18 antitank guns [37mm to 75mm]; 6 mortar pits; approximately 40 rocket-launching sites; each with four 38-millimeter rocket tubes; and NO LESS THAN 85 strategically placed machine gun nests.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omaha_Beach

    (bop at Normandy's Omaha Beach, and general area - 1963, 1985, 1997.)
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  7. Thanks to Richard
  8. Subject: Fw: Why Did The de Havilland Comet Keep Crashing?

  9.    Why Did The de Havilland Comet Keep Crashing?The world's first jetliner, the de Havilland Comet, was crashing, and no one knew why.By Plane &Pilot
  10.    The Mystery: What was causing the crashes of the pioneering jet the de
  11. Havilland Comet.The Backstory: When it comes
  12. to lists of planes, the de Havilland Comet jetliner is often
  13. mentioned prominently. It was not only the first jet
  14. airliner, but many regard it as one of the most beautiful
  15. aircraft of all time. Others note that its place in history
  16. is assured as a design with an early history of mysterious,
  17. fatal crashes.Commissioned in the
  18. early 1940s by the British government in its quest to find a
  19. fast and capable mail plane, famed designer Geoffrey de
  20. Havilland answered the call with the Comet, a jet-powered
  21. design that would likely be the first such plane in history.
  22. The idea was risky. Jet engines, while more reliable than
  23. large piston radial engines, like those that powered the
  24. rival Lockheed Constellation, were expensive, difficult to
  25. maintain and prone to mechanical problems. Turbofans, which
  26. are the engine of choice in jet planes today, had not yet
  27. come into general use, and the turbojets of the day were
  28. fuel guzzlers. Despite this, de Havilland won the
  29. competition and began work on the Comet. In 1952, the
  30. company delivered the first DH 106 to British Overseas
  31. Airways Corporation (BOAC). Other customers appeared,
  32. including British European Airways and the British
  33. government.The
  34. engines on the first plane were the Halford H.2 Ghost 50
  35. turbojets; they were buried in sleek enclosures in the wing
  36. root. If there were going to be troubles with the plane, the
  37. new engines were thought to be the likely causes. They
  38. weren't.The
  39. first disaster took place in January 1954, around
  40. two-and-a-half years after the first Comet delivery, when
  41. the first production Comet, operated by BOAC, broke up in
  42. mid-air over the Mediterranean Sea 20 minutes after taking
  43. off from an airport in Italy. All 36 people aboard died in
  44. the accident. Investigators suspected sabotage, fire,
  45. flutter and an explosion in a fuel tank. After recovering
  46. and examining much of the debris from the plane, the
  47. committee heading up the inquiry declared that the plane
  48. wasn't the problem.De
  49. Havilland, which had voluntarily grounded the small fleet,
  50. in March okayed the planes for flight. In April, another
  51. Comet, this one operated by South African Airways, came
  52. apart in midair, again over the Mediterranean. All 21 aboard
  53. lost their lives.The
  54. Comet was grounded, this time permanently, and its
  55. certification was revoked. De Havilland went to work finding
  56. the root cause, and a few months later discovered
  57. it.The
  58. Truth: By testing the
  59. structure of an existing Comet in a water tank under
  60. repeated pressurization cycles, the truth became clear when
  61. the fuselage of the test article came apart in an explosive
  62. decompression. This was after just over 3,000 pressurization
  63. cycles. The cause of the two planes breaking up in
  64. mid-flight was found. It was metal fatigue. Engineers
  65. redesigned the structure of the plane for what became the
  66. Comet 2, and that was the end of that issue. The company
  67. went on to produce 114 of the aircraft, ending with the
  68. Comet 4 model, which was last produced in
  69. 1959.Sadly, the Comet,
  70. even after the cause of its mystery woes was diagnosed, had
  71. a terrible safety record, with 26 hull losses during its
  72. short operational life, resulting in more than 400
  73. fatalities.But
  74. its role as a pioneer helped pave the way for future
  75. airliners, and De Havilland's engineers'
  76. discovery of the dangers of metal fatigue from
  77. pressurization cycles made future airliners far safer from
  78. that danger than before. Although a few explosive
  79. depressurizations have occurred since that time, the designs
  80. of the planes that suffered them were quickly modified to
  81. cut down on future risks.  
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  84. Thanks to Mike….wow
  85. helo rescue with spinning 74 year old lady in litter
  86. How Embarrassing! What a ride for the 74 year old...
  87. https://www.facebook.com/ABC15/videos/448098122617310/
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  90. Thanks to Mugs
  91. June 6, 2019
    By Chris Stirewalt


  92. On the roster: Why they fought - 

    WHY THEY FOUGHT 
    Americans have a thing about imagining what would have happened if the Axis powers had won World War II.

    "The Man in the High Castle," a popular television series about the German and Japanese occupation of the United States, based on the 1962 Philip K. Dick novel of the same name, is only the most recent installment of these alternate histories. In the 1990s, the novel "Fatherland" was a smash hit and writers ranging from Noël Coward to Gene Roddenberry have tried their hand at the genre.  

    The "what if" is so hard for us to resist for a many reasons. First, there has seldom been a more clearly evil enterprise than the effort by fascist powers to dominate the world. Writing about genocidal Nazis makes easy work of defining good guys and bad guys. But there's also the fact that imagining these dark alternatives reminds us of the enormity of America's achievement in the Allied victory.

    And nothing has come to symbolize that achievement as the successful landing on the coast of Normandy, France, 75 years ago today. The sacrifice, endurance and valor of those men that day are understood by every American as a full expression of the best our nation has to offer.

    But why were they there that day?

    In his still-unsurpassed speech commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Allied victory in June of 1984, then-President Ronald Reagan, speaking to the assembled veterans put it this way: "The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge – and pray God we have not lost it – that there is a profound, moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt."

    The fight there was not to protect America's own shores but to free our fellow human beings from oppression. Yes, swiftly, thoroughly breaking the back of the Nazi Wehrmacht would help ensure America's future security. And yes, we were obligated to fight for our allies. But by the fifth year of the European war, the kind of world imagined in "The Man in the High Castle" was already pure fiction.

    The Nazis' always-fantastical dream of "the Thousand Year Reich" with Berlin as the new Rome at the hub of a vast empire spanning the globe was effectively ended on Jan. 31, 1943 when Field Marshal Friedrich von Paulus surrendered to the Soviets at Stalingrad. The utter destruction of the German Sixth Army and the resulting rout of Nazi forces on the Eastern Front had already sealed the fate of the Nazi's perverse fantasies of world conquest. By the time of the Battle of Kursk in July of 1943, it was clear that Germany could no longer contain the Soviet counteroffensive. The march to the Brandenburg Gate had begun.

    By the time Allied forces made landfall at Normandy, Soviet forces had been besieging Berlin for more than six months.

    Now, the Soviets would have had a harder time if the German high command didn't have to maintain the Atlantic Wall against U.S. and British invasion. But by that point, the Allies had already defeated fascist Italy and liberated Rome from German occupation.

    The fall of the Nazi regime was already certain, but what we did not know was how or when.

    Certainly the non-fanatics in the German high command were preparing for the moment, imagining an armistice something like the one that had ended the previous world war. How might they maintain some territorial autonomy? Could war crime charges be avoided? Could they find a way to surrender to the civilized forces of the West rather than the brutalizing Soviets?

    Indeed, the discussion of Allied leaders had shifted away from winning the war to winning the peace by the time of the meeting of the Western powers at Casablanca in January of 1943. It would not be enough to defeat the Axis powers, but to establish a new order for Europe that would both prevent a third such conflict but also prevent the Soviets from replacing one occupation with another.

    The alternate future we might consider if D-Day had never happened isn't one of swastikas around the Washington Monument, but of Soviet oppression spanning three continents.

    The Army Rangers who scaled the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc under withering fire were there to liberate, yes. But also to conquer. Not in the traditional sense of occupation and subjugation, but in the sense of conquering the ancient notion that any man or nation has the right to rule another.

    They climbed carrying the American creed on their hearts: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

    The victory they won that day and those in the weeks that followed in their race to Berlin carried that creed forward as their standard just as surely as Roman legions had held high the golden eagle of their empire in conquering the same lands two thousand years before. They had come to subjugate, we had come to defeat the very idea of subjugation.

    The Soviets may have struck the most devastating blow in defeating the Nazi regime, but the forces of the Atlantic alliance won the peace in the months after D-Day. In liberated Europe, German prison camps would not be replaced with Soviet ones and one form of tyranny would not be exchanged for another. A new order, built on the American model, would end the centuries of war and strife on the western side of the continent.

    There have been manifold practical benefits for America from the sacrifices made on that day and in those moths. We are no doubt richer, safer and freer than if we had not breached the Atlantic Wall.

    But those brave men also set a new moral standard for the world. Our victory in the Cold War and the 74 years of relative peace and expanding prosperity for the world can trace their roots to the men who knew "profound, moral difference" between the American way and the way the world had always been before.     


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  94.  
  95. Subject: Fwd: The Douglas DC-3 and C-47 
  96. The Douglas DC-3 and C-47 Skytrains, commonly referred to as Dakotas, ferried thousands of Allied troops into Nazi-occupied Europe on D-Day.

  97.   https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7103901/30-Dakotas-fly-RAF-Duxford-75th-D-Day-anniversary.html?ito=email_share_article-factbox


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  99. These are always fun
  100. Thanks to Rob …and Dr. Rich
  101. Some old, some new … all interesting!!

  102. FOR THOSE WHO LOVE THE PHILOSOPHY OF AMBIGUITY


  103. 1. DON'T SWEAT THE PETTY THINGS AND DON'T PET THE SWEATY THINGS.

  104. 2. ONE TEQUILA, TWO TEQUILA, THREE TEQUILA, FLOOR.....

  105. 3. ATHEISM IS A NON-PROPHET ORGANIZATION.

  106. 4. IF MAN EVOLVED FROM MONKEYS AND APES, WHY DO WE STILL HAVE MONKEYS AND APES?

  107. 5. THE MAIN REASON SANTA IS SO JOLLY IS BECAUSE HE KNOWS WHERE ALL THE BAD GIRLS LIVE.

  108. 6. I WENT TO A BOOKSTORE AND ASKED THE SALESWOMAN, 'WHERE'S THE SELF-HELP SECTION?' SHE SAID IF SHE TOLD ME, IT WOULD DEFEAT THE PURPOSE.

  109. 7. WHAT IF THERE WERE NO HYPOTHETICAL QUESTIONS?

  110. 8. IF A DEAF PERSON SWEARS, DOES HIS MOTHER WASH HIS HANDS WITH SOAP?

  111. 9. IF SOMEONE WITH MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES THREATENS TO KILL HIMSELF, IS IT CONSIDERED A HOSTAGE SITUATION?

  112. 10. IS THERE ANOTHER WORD FOR SYNONYM?

  113. 11. WHERE DO FOREST RANGERS GO TO 'GET AWAY FROM IT ALL?'

  114. 12. WHAT DO  YOU DO WHEN YOU SEE AN ENDANGERED ANIMAL EATING AN ENDANGERED PLANT?

  115. 13. IF A PARSLEY FARMER IS SUED, CAN THEY GARNISH HIS WAGES?

  116. 14. WOULD A FLY WITHOUT WINGS BE CALLED A WALK?

  117. 15 WHY DO THEY LOCK GAS STATION BATHROOMS? ARE THEY AFRAID SOMEONE WILL CLEAN THEM?

  118. 16. IF A TURTLE DOESN'T HAVE A SHELL, IS HE HOMELESS OR NAKED?

  119. 17. CAN VEGETARIANS EAT ANIMAL CRACKERS?

  120. 18. IF THE POLICE ARREST A MIME, DO THEY TELL HIM HE HAS THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT?

  121. 19. WHY DO THEY PUT BRAILLE ON THE DRIVE-THROUGH BANK MACHINES?

  122. 20. HOW DO THEY GET DEER TO CROSS THE ROAD ONLY AT THOSE YELLOW ROAD SIGNS?

  123. 21. WHAT WAS THE BEST THING BEFORE SLICED BREAD?

  124. 22. ONE NICE THING ABOUT EGOTISTS: THEY DON'T TALK ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE.

  125. 23. DOES THE LITTLE  MERMAID WEAR AN ALGEBRA?

  126. 24. HOW IS IT POSSIBLE TO HAVE A CIVIL WAR?

  127. 25. IF ONE SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMER DROWNS, DO THE REST DROWN TOO?

  128. 26. IF YOU ATE BOTH PASTA AND ANTIPASTO, WOULD YOU STILL BE HUNGRY?

  129. 27. IF YOU TRY TO FAIL, AND SUCCEED, WHICH HAVE YOU DONE?

  130. 28. WHOSE CRUEL IDEA WAS IT FOR THE WORD 'LISP' TO HAVE AN 'S' IN IT?

  131. 29. WHY ARE HEMORRHOIDS CALLED 'HEMORRHOIDS' INSTEAD OF 'ASSTEROIDS'?

  132. 30.. WHY IS IT CALLED TOURIST SEASON IF WE CAN'T SHOOT AT THEM?

  133. 31. WHY IS THERE AN EXPIRATION DATE ON SOUR CREAM?

  134. 32. IF YOU SPIN AN ORIENTAL MAN IN A CIRCLE THREE TIMES DOES HE BECOME DISORIENTED?

  135. 33. CAN AN ATHEIST GET INSURANCE AGAINST ACTS OF GOD?


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  137.  
  138. Thanks to Robert
  139. As we look back to 75 years ago, here is a story narrated by Sam Elliot.  My father was in the second wave on Omaha Beach as a US Army Combat Engineer.  Truly our Greatest Generation.  Hand Salute.
  140.  
  141.  
  142. A D-Day Survivor Story
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  145.  
  146. India—Deal Inked With Israel For More Spice Guided Bombs Hindustan Times | 06/07/2019 The Indian air force has finalized a contract with Israel for more Spice guided bombs, reports the Hindustan Times. The US$43.4 million deal with Rafael Advanced Defense Systems covers around 100 Spice 2000 weapons, according to unnamed defense ministry officials. The procurement was for an urgent operational requirement, with deliveries anticipated by the end of the year, the officials said. The air force employed Spice 2000 bombs in its attack on a suspected Jaish-e-Mohammed terrorist base in Pakistan in February in response to an attack in Pulwama in Kashmir that killed 40 Indian paramilitaries. 
  147.  
  148. Afghanistan—Security Forces Expel Taliban From Khwaja Omari District After A Year Khaama Press | 06/07/2019 About a year after the Taliban captured the Khwaja Omari district in the east-central Ghazni province, Afghan security forces have regained control, reports the Khaama Press. On Friday, the Interior Ministry announced that security forces had recaptured the district. Afghan forces regained control of the Deh Yak district in Ghazni in a similar operation last month, the news service noted. The defense ministry has not provided any other information about the operation.
  149.  
  150. USA—Arms Deal With Saudi Arabia Includes Tech Transfer For Smart Bombs New York Times | 06/07/2019 The sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia that was fast-tracked by President Trump using an emergency measure includes technology transfer to allow Riyadh to build precision-guided munitions domestically, reports the New York Times. The emergency authorization issued in May permits Raytheon to work with Saudi firms to build sophisticated bomb components in Saudi Arabia. The measure came to light when the administration released more information about the sales to Congress this week. As part of the program, Saudi Arabia will be permitted to begin assembling control systems, guidance electronics and circuit cards for Pavewayguided bombs. The U.S. has previously closely guarded such technology for security reasons. A Raytheon spokesman emphasized that such industrial cooperation was common. The arms sales to Saudi Arabia have been opposed by many, including lawmakers, on humanitarian grounds. The Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen has been accused of using American weapons in strikes on civilians.  
  151.  
  152. Libya—Haftar's Forces Strike Tripoli Airport Again Al Jazeera | 06/07/2019 Forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar have attacked a military base at the Tripoli airport for a second night, reports Al Jazeera (Qatar). On Thursday night, Libyan National Army aircraft hit the military section of the airport, it said in a statement. The LNA is loyal to the government in Tobruk in eastern Libya. The airstrike targeted an unidentified "Turkish plane," the LNA said without providing details. The military force reported a similar attack on Wednesday night, noted Reuters. Haftar has been leading the LNA in an attack on the internationally-recognized government in Tripoli, which has stalled in the southern suburbs of the Libyan capital.     
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  154. Mexico—National Guard Headed To Southern Border To Stem Migrant Flows, Foreign Minister Says Reuters | 06/07/2019 Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard says that his country will send its national guard to the southern border with Guatemala in an effort to halt migration, reports Reuters. Some 6,000 troops will be deployed, Ebrard told reporters on Thursday following a meeting with U.S. officials in Washington. President Donald Trump has threatened to slap 5 percent tariffs on all goods imported from Mexico next week if it does not do more to prevent illegal migrants from reaching the U.S., noted CNBC. Bilateral talks on the migration issue were expected to continue on Friday.
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  156. India—2 Deserters Killed In Clashes With Security Forces In Pulwama Press Trust Of India | 06/07/2019 Four militants, including two special police officers who had recently deserted, have been killed in a security operation in the Pulwama district of Kashmir, reports the Press Trust of India. On Friday, security forces launched a cordon-and-search operation at Panjran after receiving credible intelligence, said a police spokesman. During the operation, militants opened fire on security personnel. Four militants from the Jaish-e-Mohammed terrorist group were killed in the subsequent gun battle, the spokesman said. Police had opened an investigation into the deserters on Thursday when they failed to report back following the Eid holiday, reported Reuters.     
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  158. USA—Shanahan Suspends Training For Turkish F-35 Pilots Foreign Policy | 06/07/2019 Acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has suspended training for Turkish F-35 pilots amid an ongoing dispute over Ankara's procurement of advanced Russian air defense systems, reports Foreign Policy. In a letter dated June 6, Shanahan told Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar that the 42 Turkish trainee pilots at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., and Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., will be required to leave the United States by July 31. All training for new Turkish student pilots has also been suspended. Should Turkey cancel its purchase of the S-400 air defense system, the measures will be reversed, a senior U.S. defense official told the magazine. The surface-to-air missile systems could be delivered as soon as this month. If Ankara takes delivery of the S-400 prior to July 31, the "measured and deliberate" plan would be "nullified," said Shanahan's letter. Washington has already halted delivery of F-35 materials and equipment to Turkey. The Pentagon has warned Turkey repeatedly over the last year that the purchase of the S-400 system would result in its suspension from the F-35 program.    
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  160. USA—Navy Blames Russian Destroyer For Near Collision In Philippine Sea Navy Newsstand | 06/07/2019 A Russian warship nearly collided with a U.S. Navy cruiser after executing an "unsafe maneuver" in the Philippine Sea, reports the Navy NewsStand. On Friday, the destroyer Admiral Vinogradov closed to with 50-100 feet (15-30 m) of USS Chancellorsville, putting the cruiser and her crew at risk, the Navy said. The Chancellorsville was sailing on a steady course and speed to recover its helicopter when the Russian warship maneuvered from behind and to the right of the U.S. ship, accelerated and closed to an unsafe distance, the Navy said. This maneuver forced the cruiser to put its engines into full reverse and maneuver to avoid a collision. Russia's actions were unsafe and unprofessional and violated the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), the service said. The Russian Pacific Fleet rejected the U.S. account, saying that the Chancellorsville had instigated the near collision, reported CNN. "When moving (on) parallel courses of a detachment of ships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier group of the U.S. Navy, the cruiser Chancellorsville suddenly changed its direction and crossed within 50 meters of the Admiral Vinogradov," said a Russian navy statement cited by RIA Novosti. The Russian report also said that the incident had taken place in the East China Sea and not the Philippine Sea. The two bodies of water are separated by the Japanese-administered Senkaku Islands.    
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  162. USA—L3 To Upgrade Avionics On Guard, Reserve C-130 Transports Dept. Of Defense | 06/07/2019 The U.S. Air Force has awarded L3 Communications Integrated Systems, Waco, Texas, a $499.6 million contract for a major avionics upgrade for C-130H cargo aircraft, reports the Dept. of Defense. The deal covers engineering and manufacturing development through production as well as training and logistics requirements, the Pentagon said on Tuesday. The program will modernize the avionics on 176 C-130H transports operated by the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Command. Work under the contract is scheduled to be completed by Sept. 30, 2029.   
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  164. USA—Upgraded Warships To Rotate To Rota Base In Spain U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Africa | 06/07/2019 The U.S. Navy has decided to rotate its most advanced warships to replace less capable destroyers currently based at Rota, Spain, reports U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Africa. As part of the move, a helicopter maritime strike squadron will also be relocated to Rota to strengthen the multimission capabilities of the ships deployed there. The rotation will be staggered, with the first slated to begin in 2020. The transition is expected to be completed by the spring of 2022. During the process, those ships assigned to Forward Deployed Naval Force-Europe (FDNF-E) will continue to conduct their assigned missions in the 6th Fleet area of operations, the command said.  
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  166. Qatar—Initial Batch Of Rafale Fighters Arrives From France Qatar News Agency | 06/07/2019 The first five of 36 Rafale fighter jets Qatar has ordered have arrived from France, reports the Qatar News Agency. The initial batch of aircraft arrived at Dukhan Air Base on Wednesday afternoon. Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, the emir of Qatar, participated in a ceremony marking the delivery. Qatar ordered 24 Rafales in 2015. Another 12 were procured in 2018, noted defense-aerospace.com. France formally delivered the initial aircraft in Merignac in southwestern France in February. The jets have been used for pilot training since.    
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  168. Lithuania—Patrol Ships Practice ASW With German Navy Lithuanian Ministry Of Defense | 06/07/2019 Lithuanian navy patrol ships have been enhancing their anti-submarine warfare capabilities with newly acquired sonar systems, reports the Lithuanian Ministry of Defense. The Zemaitis-class patrol ships Dzukas and Aukstaitis have been fitted with variable depth sonars, which are designed to record, identify and track underwater objects. Another ship in the class, the Selis, is set to receive a similar system. The Aukstaitis is currently training with the German submarine U-33 and oceangoing tug Fehmarn in the Baltic Sea. The drills are scheduled to run through June 10. The training is focused on deploying and operating the sonar, while training with a submarine will help evaluate the sonar's characteristics in the Baltic Sea, Lithuanian officials said.    
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  170. India—New Defense Minister Urges Domestic Solutions To Fill Capability Gaps Times Of India | 06/07/2019 India's new defense minister has been reviewing the military's acquisition programs among other policy areas, reports the Times of India. Noting that the armed forces continue to suffer a shortage of submarines, fighter jets, helicopters, minesweepers, infantry weapons and other equipment, on Thursday, Rajnath Singh directed defense ministry officials to seek indigenous systems where possible to plug the gaps. Over the last five years, the ministry has failed to launch any new domestic programs to address the shortfalls, he said. Singh was also briefed on defense cooperation activities, including the recent completion of a new process to accelerate the sale of military equipment to countries such as Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burma, Sri Lanka and Vietnam. The new defense minister also reviewed military planning activities and matters relating to defense diplomacy, including exercises, training and capacity building.     
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  172. Slovenia—Troops Train With U.S. National Guardsmen Near Divaca Army News Service | 06/07/2019 The Slovenian army has just completed an exercise with military police from the Colorado National Guard, reports the Army News Service. On June 5, the 220th Military Police Company conducted a cross-training exercise with Slovenian troops near Divaca in southwestern Slovenia. The drills covered protective services operations and advanced rifle marksmanship, said an Army release. The training also focused on firearms techniques such as assuming a good firing stance and performing tactical reloads. The 220th also held joint qualification ranges for its soldiers, Slovenian troops and personnel from the 174th Air Defense Artillery Brigade of the Ohio National Guard. The Coloradan Guardsmen were in Slovenia primarily to take part in exercises Immediate Response and Astral Knight, providing site security, entry checkpoints, convoy security and route reconnaissance in Divaca and Koper, Slovenia, the service said.    
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  174. Sudan—Membership In A.U. Suspended Over Crackdown Al Jazeera | 06/07/2019 The African Union has suspended Sudan's membership following its deadly crackdown on protesters earlier this week, reports Al Jazeera (Qatar). On Thursday, the A.U.'s Peace and Security Dept. indicated that Sudan's participation in all of the organization's activities was suspended pending the "effective establishment of a civilian-led transitional authority." A.U. officials described this as the only way to resolve the crisis in Sudan. The announcement came after an emergency A.U. meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Meanwhile, Ethiopia was expected to launch an effort on Friday to mediate between the Transitional Military Council and the opposition, reported Reuters.
        
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  176. USA—Cadet Killed, 22 Injured In Vehicle Accident Near West Point Nbc News | 06/07/2019 At least one cadet has been killed and nearly two dozen people injured in a military vehicle rollover near a training site outside of West Point, reports NBC News. A Light Medium Tactical Vehicle crashed Thursday morning near the Camp Natural Bridge training site in New York state. Members of Task Force 1-28 out of Fort Stewart, Ga., were driving at the time, said an Army spokesman. The soldiers were at West Point to train cadets. Twenty cadets and two soldiers were wounded in the accident, said a spokesperson for West Point. The cause of the crash was not immediately known. Cadets participate in field training exercises during their second summer at West Point to familiarize them with individual soldier skills and combined arms operations,noted                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

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