Wednesday, January 16, 2019

TheList 4904

The List 4904    TGB


 
To All,
 
A bit of history and some tidbits.
 
Regards,
Skip
 
. This Day In Naval History
 
Jan. 16
§  1815—Benjamin Crowninshield takes office as the fifth Secretary of the Navy, serving until Sept. 30, 1818. He implements the Board of Commissioners administrative system and the building of several ships. He also oversees strategy and naval policy for the brief, and very successful war with Algiers in 1815.
§  1840—During the Exploring Expedition, USS Vincennes, commanded by Lt. Charles Wilkes, becomes the first U.S. Navy ship to reach the Antarctic Continent.
§  1893—The class protected cruiser Boston lands Marines at Honolulu, HI, to protect American lives and property after the deposition of Queen Liliuokalani and the formation of a provisional government, under the influence of American residents.
§  1930—USS Lexington (CV 2) completes a 30-day period in which it furnishes electricity to Tacoma, WA, in an emergency arising from a drought that causes a water shortage and hydro-electric power is not available in the Puget Sound area.
§  1944—TBF aircraft from Composite Squadron Thirteen (VC-13) of carrier Guadalcanal (CVE 60) sink U-544 north-west of the Azores.
§  1945—USS Otter (DE 210), USS Hubbard (DE 211), USS Hayter (DE 212) and USS Varian (DE 798) sink German submarine U 248 north-northeast of the Azores.
§  1971—Amphibious command ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20) is commissioned.
§  1991—Operation Desert Storm begins to liberate Kuwait from Iraq. After three months, Iraq requests a cease fire, which is formalized by the United Nations in April.
§  2010—Littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2), the lead ship of its class, is commissioned at Mobile, AL.
 
Thanks to CHINFO
 
Executive Summary:
National media are reporting that British Prime Minister Theresa May suffered the worst defeat in the modern parliamentary era by a prime minister, as lawmakers shot down her Brexit deal with the European Union by 230 votes, and New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand formally announced her intention to run for President in 2020.  Speaking at the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Vice Adm. Richard Brown called on Sailors to develop "a sense of urgency" over the Russian and Chinese Navies reports Breaking Defense. "Most importantly, we must prepare for this great power competition by embracing the concept of Mission Command," said Brown while calling on junior sailors to be ready to take the initiative in a potential conflict. Rear Adm. Ron Boxall told USNI news that the Navy will begin talks with industry this week for the next large combatant in its Future Surface Combatant family of systems. Additionally, USNI News reports that Lockheed Martin's latest Aegis combat weapon system upgrade will not only be built for the upcoming Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, but also provide backward compatibility.
 
2016 Today in History January 16
1547

Ivan IV crowns himself the new Czar of Russia in Assumption Cathedral in Moscow.
1786

The Council of Virginia guarantees religious freedom.
1847

John C. Fremont, the famed "Pathfinder" of Western exploration, is appointed governor of California.
1865

General William T. Sherman begins a march through the Carolinas.
1900

The U.S. Senate recognizes the Anglo-German Treaty of 1899 by which the UK renounced its rights to the Samoan Islands.
1909

One of Ernest Shackleton's polar exploration teams reaches the Magnetic South Pole.
1914

Maxim Gorky is authorized to return to Russia after an eight year exile for political dissidence.
1920

The League of Nations holds its first meeting in Paris.
1920

Allies lift the blockade on trade with Russia.
1939

Franklin D. Roosevelt asks for an extension of the Social Security Act to include more women and children.
1940

Hitler cancels an attack in the West due to bad weather and the capture of German attack plans in Belgium.
1942

Japan's advance into Burma begins.
1944

Eisenhower assumes supreme command of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe.
1945

The U.S. First and Third armies link up at Houffalize, effectively ending the Battle of the Bulge.
1956

The Egyptian government makes Islam the state religion.
1965

Eighteen are arrested in Mississippi for the murder of three civil rights workers.
1975

The Irish Republican Army calls an end to a 25-day cease fire in Belfast.
1979

The Shah leaves Iran.
1991

The Persian Gulf War begins. The massive U.S.-led offensive against Iraq -- Operation Desert Storm -- ends on February 28, 1991, when President George Bush declares a cease-fire, and Iraq pledges to honor future coalition and U.N. peace terms.
 
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From Sons of Liberty to Devils in Baggy Pants by W. Thomas Smith Jr.
01/18/2017
 
This Week in American Military History:
 
Jan. 17, 1781:  Continental Army forces -- including infantry, cavalry, dragoons (horse-mounted infantry), and militia – under the command of Brig.
Gen. Daniel Morgan, clash with a better-equipped, more-experienced force of British Army regulars and Loyalists under the command of Lt. Col. Banastre "Bloody Ban" Tarleton in a sprawling pastureland known as Hannah's Cowpens in the South Carolina upcountry.
 
Celebrated today as the Battle of Cowpens, the engagement ends in a decisive victory for Morgan – who defeats Tarleton in a classic double-envelopment – and a near-irrevocable loss of men, equipment, and reputation for the infamous Tarleton and his "British Legion."
 
Tarleton's boss, Gen. Sir Charles Cornwallis, will abandon South Carolina and in less than two months chalk up a pyrrhic victory at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse (N.C.). Meanwhile, word of Morgan's victory will spread like wildfire throughout the Carolinas and up into Virginia where – at Yorktown – Cornwallis' entire army (including Tarleton and his feared green-jacketed horsemen) will surrender to the combined American-French forces of Generals George Washington and Comte de Rochambeau on October 19, almost nine months to the day after Cowpens.
 
Jan. 17, 1991:  Two-hundred-ten years to the day after the Battle of Cowpens; American, British, and French forces – this time all three on the same team – kick off what Iraqi Pres. Saddam Hussein predicted would be "the Mother of all Battles" with a series of blistering air attacks aimed at destroying the Iraqi Air Force, Iraq's air-defense forces and overall command and control. It is day one of Operation Desert Storm.
 
Jan. 18, 1911:  Flying over San Francisco Bay in his Curtiss Pusher Model "D" aircraft, pioneer aviator Eugene B. Ely approaches the anchored cruiser USS Pennsylvania and manages to land onto a special platform fitted with a makeshift tailhook system aboard the ship. Upon landing, he purportedly says, "It was easy enough. I think the trick could be successfully turned nine times out of ten."
 
Ely's landing is the first-ever airplane landing aboard a ship. Ely already had become the first man to take off from a ship in November. In July, he will be commissioned a second lieutenant in the California National Guard.
In October, he will be killed in a crash during an aerobatic demonstration in Macon, Georgia.
 
Jan. 19-20, 1770:  The little-known but historically significant Battle of Golden Hill erupts in New York City between a group of angry Manhattan patriots and a contingent of British soldiers.
 
The clash begins when members of the patriot organization "Sons of Liberty"
snatch a few of the King's men, who are cutting down wooden "liberty poles"
(symbols of resistance against British rule) which had been erected by the "Sons." The redcoats also were reportedly posting bills condemning the Sons of Liberty as "the real enemies of society." A struggle ensues. Redcoats from the nearby barracks respond, and a bayonet charge is ordered. Several are wounded on both sides, and one civilian is killed.
 
Less than seven weeks before the Boston Massacre, the Battle of Golden Hill is considered by some historians as the first armed clash of the American Revolution.
 
Jan. 20, 1914:  Nearly three years to the day after Eugene Ely lands his airplane on USS Pennsylvania, "the cradle of Naval aviation" is born at Pensacola, Florida.
 
According to the American Naval Historical Center: "The aviation unit from Annapolis [Maryland], consisting of nine officers, 23 men, seven aircraft, portable hangars, and other gear, under Lieutenant J. H. Towers" arrives at Pensacola aboard the battleship USS Mississippi and the bulk-cargo ship USS Orion "to set up a flying school."
 
Jan. 21, 1903:  The Militia Act of 1903 – also known as the "Dick Act"
(Congressman and Maj. Gen. Charles Dick authored much of the legislation) – is passed, establishing federal standards and greater federal control over state militias, essentially creating the modern National Guard.
 
Jan. 21, 1954:  First Lady Mamie Eisenhower breaks a bottle of champagne across the bow of USS Nautilus in Groton, Connecticut, launching the world's first nuclear-powered submarine. The following year, Nautilus gets underway, begins breaking numerous sea-travel records, and becomes the first "ship" to cross the North Pole.
 
Nautilus is the U.S. Navy's sixth vessel bearing the name. The first Nautilus, a schooner built in 1799, saw action against the Barbary pirates and in the War of 1812.
 
Jan. 22, 1944:  Allied forces, including the U.S. VI Corps under the command of Maj. Gen. John P. Lucas (of Lt. Gen. Mark Clark's Fifth Army), begin a series of landings along a stretch of western Italian coastline in the Anzio-Nettuno area. Codenamed Operation Shingle, the Allies achieve complete surprise against – and encounter little initial resistance from – the Germans. But the landings kick off what will become one of the most grueling campaigns of World War II.
 
It is during the subsequent fighting (which continues for several months) that a dead German officer's diary is found, a portion of which reads:
 
"American parachutists – devils in baggy pants – are less than 100 meters from my outpost line. I can't sleep at night; they pop up from nowhere and we never know when or how they will strike next. Seems like the black-hearted devils are everywhere."
 
 
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Thanks to Richard….I remember reading these when going from base to base with my family in the 40s and 50s.
Subject: Fw: Burma Shave
A man, a miss,
A car, a curve.

He kissed the miss,
And missed the curve.
Burma Shave 

I'm sure that Burma Shave actually saved some lives. People laughed and then were more careful! It was a REAL "service" to America, even though it was an advertisement and it was one of the RARE "really useful" ones!
To My Old-As-Dirt Friends and Relatives who qualify as "old as dirt."
For those who never saw any of the Burma Shave signs, here is a quick lesson in our history of the 1930's and '40's.
Before there were interstates, when everyone drove the old 2 lane roads, Burma Shave signs
would be posted all over the countryside in farmers' fields. They were small red signs with white letters. Five signs, about 100 feet apart, each containing 1 line of a 4 line couplet and the obligatory 5th sign advertising Burma Shave, a popular shaving cream.

DON'T STICK YOUR ELBOW
OUT SO FAR
IT MAY GO HOME
IN ANOTHER CAR.
Burma Shave 

TRAINS DON'T WANDER
ALL OVER THE MAP
'CAUSE NOBODY SITS
IN THE ENGINEER'S LAP.
Burma Shave 

SHE KISSED THE HAIRBRUSH
BY MISTAKE
SHE THOUGHT IT WAS
HER HUSBAND JAKE.
Burma Shave 

DON'T LOSE YOUR HEAD
TO GAIN A MINUTE
YOU NEED YOUR HEAD
YOUR BRAINS ARE IN IT.
Burma Shave 

DROVE TOO LONG
DRIVER SNOOZING
WHAT HAPPENED NEXT
IS NOT AMUSING.
Burma Shave 

BROTHER SPEEDER
LET'S REHEARSE
ALL TOGETHER
GOOD MORNING, NURSE. 
Burma Shave 

CAUTIOUS RIDER
TO HER RECKLESS DEAR
LET'S HAVE LESS BULL
AND A LITTLE MORE STEER. 
Burma Shave 

SPEED WAS HIGH
WEATHER WAS NOT
TIRES WERE THIN 
X MARKS THE SPOT.
Burma Shave 

THE MIDNIGHT RIDE
OF PAUL FOR BEER
LED TO A WARMER 
HEMISPHERE.
Burma Shave 

AROUND THE CURVE
LICKETY-SPLIT 
BEAUTIFUL CAR
WASN'T IT?
Burma Shave 

NO MATTER THE PRICE 
NO MATTER HOW NEW
THE BEST SAFETY DEVICE
IN THE CAR IS YOU.
Burma Shave 

A GUY WHO DRIVES
A CAR WIDE OPEN
IS NOT THINKIN'
HE'S JUST HOPING
Burma Shave 

AT INTERSECTIONS
LOOK EACH WAY
A HARP SOUNDS NICE
BUT IT'S HARD TO PLAY.
Burma Shave 

BOTH HANDS ON THE WHEEL
EYES ON THE ROAD
THAT'S THE SKILLFUL
DRIVER'S CODE.
Burma Shave 

THE ONE WHO DRIVES
WHEN HE'S BEEN DRINKING
DEPENDS ON YOU
TO DO HIS THINKING.
Burma Shave 

CAR IN DITCH
DRIVER IN TREE
THE MOON WAS FULL
AND SO WAS HE.
Burma Shave 

PASSING SCHOOL ZONE
TAKE IT SLOW
LET OUR LITTLE
SHAVERS GROW. 
Burma Shave 

Do these bring back any old memories? If not, you're merely a child.
If they do - then you're old as dirt. LIKE ME!
I loved reading them.
Have a great day!
 



 
A bit of news from around the world
 
Germany—Police Arrest Suspected Iranian Spy  nAgence France-Presse | 01/16/2019 nGerman police have arrested a military adviser on suspicion of spying for Iran, reports Agence France-Presse.  nThe German-Afghan man was working for the Bundeswehr as a linguistic and cultural adviser, prosecutors said after the arrest on Tuesday.  nThe man is suspected of passing information to Iranian intelligence services over several years, reported Der Spiegel.  nAs an employee of the German military, the suspect had access to sensitive information that included troop deployments.  n n
Syria—ISIS Suicide Attack Targets Foreign Military Patrol  nNbc News | 01/16/2019 nA suicide bombing in the northern Syria town of Manbij has resulted in multiple casualties, including U.S. troops, reports NBC News.  nOn Wednesday, an attacker in civilian clothes approached coalition forces on a foot patrol in the town's center and detonated his device, said a senior Kurdish security official. U.S. troops were among the wounded, the official said. nAt least 14 people were killed in the attack, including two U.S. troops, said the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The report could not be immediately verified, said Reuters.  nISIS claimed responsibility for the attack via a statement published on its Amaq news agency.  nU.S. troops are stationed in the city with members of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a predominately Kurdish militia fighting ISIS in Syria.  n n
Zimbabwe—At Least 5 Dead As Protests Enter 3rd Day  nBritish Broadcasting Corp. | 01/16/2019 nSoldiers have been deployed across Zimbabwe following deadly clashes between security forces and protesters, reports BBC News.  nShops in the capital, Harare, remained closed on Wednesday as the demonstrations against rising fuel prices entered their third day.  nAuthorities arrested a prominent activist, Evan Mawarire, and shuttered internet and mobile phone services across much of the country in an effort to reduce protests.  nAt least five people, including a police officer, have been killed so far, reported Al Jazeera (Qatar). Hundreds of people have been arrested in demonstrations in Harare and Bulawayo. nPolice have responded to protesters with live ammunition and tear gas, reported the Guardian (U.K.). nOn Monday, unions called for a three-day strike to protest a proposal that more than doubled the cost of fuel in the country.  nPresident Emmerson Mnangagwa said the move was necessary to prevent fuel shortages.  nThe offices of the main opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change, were burned down. The governing Zanu-PF party says some of its property has also been damaged. nActivists and watchdog groups, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized police for using excessive force on non-violent protesters n n
Russia—Air Force Eyes 2nd Batch Of Su-57 Advanced Fighters In 2020  nTass | 01/16/2019 nThe Russian air force expects to sign a contract for a second batch of Su-57 advanced fighter jets in 2020, reports Russia's Tass news agency.  nThe planned deal will cover the manufacture and delivery of 13 Su-57s, some fitted with the latest, more powerful engines, an industry source said on Wednesday. nThe new engine, known as Izdelie 30, will offer increased thrust of 17 tons, compared to the original engine's 14.5 tons of thrust.  nIn 2018, Russia signed a contract for two of the next-generation jets. The first is expected to be delivered later this year and the second in 2020.  n n
. n
Kenya—Security Forces Secure Hotel Complex In Nairobi After Al-Shabaab Assault  nGuardian | 01/16/2019 nKenyan security forces say they have taken control of a hotel and office complex in Nairobi after an attack by Al-Shabaab militants, reports the Guardian (U.K.). nOn Tuesday, between four and six gunmen opened fire on security personnel at the gate of the Dusit hotel complex in Nairobi, according to witnesses. The gunmen threw grenades into parked vehicles before entering the complex. nTwo cars were driven at high speed towards the complex on Tuesday afternoon, witnesses said. One was apparently used to blast open its gates. nCasualty tolls varied. nAt least 15 people were injured in the attack, said authorities, as quoted by the New York Times. The KTN News Kenya service said at least five people were killed. Later reports indicated that seven people were killed, with officials saying the toll was expected to increase. nPolice secured the area after a gun battle and one of the gunmen was in custody. nThe attack came exactly three years after the Somali terrorist group hit a Kenyan military base in El-Adde, Somalia, killing around 140 Kenyan soldiers. n n
France—Army Deploys MMP Missile For 1st Time During Mission In Mali  nDefense-Aerospace | 01/16/2019 nThe French Armed Forces Ministry says its new missile a moyenne portee (MMP) medium-range missile has been used in combat operations for the first time, reports defense-aerospace.com. nThe MMP missile was employed by the Picardie Battle Group during an operation in the Three Borders region in southeastern Mali from Dec. 10 to 22, said a ministry release on Monday. nThe group's commander and gunner underwent specific training on the MMP at the army's infantry school in Draguignan before its deployment, the release said. nThe MMP has a range of over 4,370 yards (4,000 m) and can be used for anti-personnel and anti-vehicle strikes, as well as against fortifications and high-value targets. The missile is equipped with camera with night vision and a fusion mode to detect heat sources. nThe weapon is a replacement for the French army's older Milan missile systems, the ministry said. n n
USA—No Progress In Latest INF Talks With Moscow  nSwiss Information Service | 01/16/2019 nU.S. officials have described recent nuclear arms talks with Russia as "disappointing," reports the Swiss Information Service. nThe Russian delegation "did not come to explain how it plans to return to full and verifiable compliance" with the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, U.S. Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security Andrea Thompson said following a Tuesday meeting in Geneva. nThe U.S. position is clear: "Russia must destroy its non-compliant missile system," Thompson said. nThe U.S. claims the Russian 9M729 cruise missile breaches the 1987 treaty, which bans all land-based cruise and ballistic missiles with a range of 300-3,400 miles (500-5,500 km). nRussian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said that Washington would be responsible for any breach of the treaty. He also criticized the "uncompromising and peremptory demands" of the U.S. nOn Dec. 4, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the U.S. would withdraw if Russia does not come into compliance within 60 days. n n
USA—Internal Probe Into Fitzgerald Destroyer Collision Reveals Litany Of Issues  nNavy Times | 01/16/2019 nAn internal review of a deadly destroyer collision in June 2017 has revealed that the ship suffered from a number of problems that contributed to the accident, reports the Navy Times. nThe dual-purpose investigation, which was obtained by the newspaper, was overseen by Rear Adm. Brian Fort and submitted 41 days after the collision on June 17, 2017, that killed seven sailors. The report was kept confidential in part because it was intended to prepare the Navy for potential lawsuits. nAccording to the report, the ship lacked proper leadership, including the absence of the captain and executive officer from the bridge during potentially dangerous transits at night through busy waterways. Junior officers were found to not report or notify superiors of dangerous instances or near misses with other ships. nA few weeks before the accident, USS Fitzgerald was involved in an incident near Sasebo in Japan's Nagasaki prefecture when a junior officer became "confused by the surface contact picture." The destroyer's then-commanding officer was absent from the bridge at the time, the report noted. nThe report records "routine, almost casual, violations of standing orders" on the bridge. Personal distrust led the officer of the deck at the time of the collision to avoid communicating with the combat information center. nThe voyage management system on the destroyer suffered from issues that led the crew to cannibalize the broken VMS station in the captain's quarters to keep the system operating. nThe destroyer had also been without a quartermaster chief petty officer, a key leader who helps navigate a warship and train its sailors, since 2015, the report says. nThe crew suffered from poor morale, a dysfunctional chief's mess and a high operational tempo leaving sailors little time to train or complete vital certifications. nFollowing the collision, the crew of the Fitzgerald was administered a "rules of the road" test for sailing. Only three of the ship's 22 officers scored over 80 percent and seven failed to achieve 50 percent n n
 


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