Thursday, December 20, 2018

TheList 4883

The List 4883 TGB


To All,
I hope that you are all having a great weekend. I am off to Arizona for a few days and the list will be off line until at least Wednesday. My younger sister was flown from Yuma to Phoenix with a variety of serious problems. Here are a couple items for you.
Regards
SKIP
This day in Naval History
Dec. 17
1812—The brig Argus, commanded by Arthur Sinclair, captures the American schooner Vancise during the War of 1812. The ship had abandoned by its crew and found derelict by another ship. A crew is placed on board and the ship is sent into the Chesapeake.
1846—During the Mexican-American War, the squadron under Commodore Matthew C. Perry captures Laguna de los Terminos without opposition. The squadron includes the side-wheeled steamer Mississippi, wooden steamer Vixen, schooner Bonito, and the shallow-draft vessel Petrel.
1863—The bark-rigged clipper ship Roebuck seizes blockade-runner British schooner Ringdove off Indian River, FL, with cargo including salt, coffee, tea, and whiskey.
1917—USS Remlik (SP 157) reportedly encounters an enemy submarine during a storm in the Bay of Biscay, but the weather prevents an engagement. While the ship is fighting the heavy seas that day, a depth charge breaks loose on her after deck and is secured by Chief Boatswain's Mate John MacKenzie, who receives the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions.
1917—While underway off Point Loma, CA, USS F 1 collides with her sister submarine, USS F 3. With her hull torn open amidships, it rapidly sinks and loses 19 crewmen.
1942—USS Grouper (SS 214) sinks the Japanese army passenger cargo ship Bandoeng Maru about 15 miles northwest of Cape Henpan, Buka Island, Solomons and survives the counterattack by submarine chaser Ch 29. 
 
 
 
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1903
First airplane flies
 
Near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville and Wilbur Wright make the first successful flight in history of a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft. Orville piloted the gasoline-powered, propeller-driven biplane, which stayed aloft for 12 seconds and covered 120 feet on its inaugural flight.
Orville and Wilbur Wright grew up in Dayton, Ohio, and developed an interest in aviation after learning of the glider flights of the German engineer Otto Lilienthal in the 1890s. Unlike their older brothers, Orville and Wilbur did not attend college, but they possessed extraordinary technical ability and a sophisticated approach to solving problems in mechanical design. They built printing presses and in 1892 opened a bicycle sales and repair shop. Soon, they were building their own bicycles, and this experience, combined with profits from their various businesses, allowed them to pursue actively their dream of building the world's first airplane.
After exhaustively researching other engineers' efforts to build a heavier-than-air, controlled aircraft, the Wright brothers wrote the U.S. Weather Bureau inquiring about a suitable place to conduct glider tests. They settled on Kitty Hawk, an isolated village on North Carolina's Outer Banks, which offered steady winds and sand dunes from which to glide and land softly. Their first glider, tested in 1900, performed poorly, but a new design, tested in 1901, was more successful. Later that year, they built a wind tunnel where they tested nearly 200 wings and airframes of different shapes and designs. The brothers' systematic experimentations paid off–they flew hundreds of successful flights in their 1902 glider at Kill Devils Hills near Kitty Hawk. Their biplane glider featured a steering system, based on a movable rudder, that solved the problem of controlled flight. They were now ready for powered flight.
In Dayton, they designed a 12-horsepower internal combustion engine with the assistance of machinist Charles Taylor and built a new aircraft to house it. They transported their aircraft in pieces to Kitty Hawk in the autumn of 1903, assembled it, made a few further tests, and on December 14 Orville made the first attempt at powered flight. The engine stalled during take-off and the plane was damaged, and they spent three days repairing it. Then at 10:35 a.m. on December 17, in front of five witnesses, the aircraft ran down a monorail track and into the air, staying aloft for 12 seconds and flying 120 feet. The modern aviation age was born. Three more tests were made that day, with Wilbur and Orville alternately flying the airplane. Wilbur flew the last flight, covering 852 feet in 59 seconds.
During the next few years, the Wright brothers further developed their airplanes but kept a low profile about their successes in order to secure patents and contracts for their flying machines. By 1905, their aircraft could perform complex maneuvers and remain aloft for up to 39 minutes at a time. In 1908, they traveled to France and made their first public flights, arousing widespread public excitement. In 1909, the U.S. Army's Signal Corps purchased a specially constructed plane, and the brothers founded the Wright Company to build and market their aircraft. Wilbur Wright died of typhoid fever in 1912; Orville lived until 1948.
The historic Wright brothers' aircraft of 1903 is on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
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2016 Today in History December 16
1431
Henry VI of England is crowned King of France.
1653
Oliver Cromwell takes on dictatorial powers with the title of "Lord Protector."
1773
To protest the tax on tea from England, a group of young Americans, disguised as Indians, throw chests of tea from British ships in Boston Harbor.
1835
A fire in New York City destroys property estimated to be worth $20,000,000. It lasts two days, ravages 17 blocks, and destroys 674 buildings including the Stock Exchange, Merchants' Exchange, Post Office, and the South Dutch Church.
1863
Confederate General Joseph Johnston takes command of the Army of Tennessee.
1864
Union forces under General George H. Thomas win the battle at Nashville, smashing an entire Confederate army.
1930
In Spain, a general strike is called in support of the revolution.
1939
The National Women's Party urges immediate congressional action on equal rights.
1940
British troops carry out an air raid on Italian Somalia.
1944
Germany mounts a major offensive in the Ardennes Forest in Belgium. As the center of the Allied line falls back, it creates a bulge, leading to the name--the Battle of the Bulge.
1949
Chinese Communist leader Mao Tse-tung is received at the Kremlin in Moscow.
1950
President Harry Truman declares a state of National Emergency as Chinese communists invade deeper into South Korea.
1976
President Jimmy Carter appoints Andrew Young as Ambassador to the United Nations.
1978
Cleveland becomes the first U.S. city to default since the depression.
1998
The United States launches a missile attack on Iraq for failing to comply with United Nations weapons inspectors.
2003
President George W. Bush signs the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, which establishes the United States' first national standards regarding email and gives the Federal Trade Commission authority to enforce the act.
 


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