Wednesday, November 14, 2018

TheList 4859






The List 4859 TGB


To All
I hope your week has started well.
Regards,
Skip
This Day in Naval History
Nov. 13
1776—The Continental Navy ship Alfred, commanded by John Paul Jones, along with Continental sloop Providence, commanded by Hoysted Hacker, capture the British transport Mellish, carrying winter uniforms later used by Gen. George Washington's troops. Three days later, Alfred captures the British brig Hetty off the New England coast.
1942—Cmdr. Herbert E. Schonland, Rear Adm. Norman Scott, Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Reinhardt J. Keppler, and Capt. Daniel J. Callaghan courageously fight enemy forces during the naval battle of Guadalcanal. Schonland later receives the Medal of Honor for his actions, while Scott, Keppler, and Callaghan posthumously receive the Medal of Honor for their actions.
1942—Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Kenneth J. Spangenberg is killed aboard USS San Francisco in the Battle of Savo Island and posthumously awarded the Navy Cross.
1942—All five Sullivan brothers are lost when the USS Juneau (CL 52) is destroyed during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.
1944—Aircraft from Carrier Task Groups 38.1, 38.3, and 38.4 attack Japanese shipping and port facilities at Manila and central Luzon.
1952—During the Korean War, USS Toledo (CA 133) carries out Operation "Counter-Punch" against Kojo gun emplacements. Three direct hits are reported.
1957—The first firing of a Regulus II bombardment missile takes place at Edwards Air Force Base, CA. 
1976—The lead ship of the newly created Los Angeles-class submarine, USS Los Angeles (SSN 688), is commissioned.
1980—VFA-125 at NAS Lemoore, CA, is established as the first squadron to train Sailors and Marines to fly and maintain F/A-18 Hornets.
2017—Retired Navy Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr., who earned the Medal of Honor during the Korean War, passes away.  On Dec. 4, 1950, Hudner crashed his own plane in order to aid downed fellow aviator Ensign Jesse L. Brown, who had been shot down by enemy anti-aircraft fire.
 
WWII@75: Allies Begin to Crack Japanese Line
 

Following the Guadalcanal Campaign, the strategy of the United States and Allies in the southwestern Pacific focused on the encirclement and eventual capture of the major Japanese base at Rabaul on New Britain. As a result, the multipronged Operation Cartwheel was adopted. The air strikes on Rabaul, Nov. 2–11, 1943, prevented Japanese naval forces from threatening at the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay. Operation Galvanic was undertaken to provide a stepping stone to the strategically located, Japanese-occupied Marshall and Marianas island chains in the central Pacific. Thus, the concurrent capture of the Tarawa atoll by the Marines and Makin atoll by the U.S. Army in November 1943 eliminated Japanese garrisons east of the Marshalls and also ensured secure lines of communications with Hawaii. On Nov. 20, the 2nd Marine Division made its initial landings on the northern side of the island, and by Nov. 28 islands in the atoll were secured. The ferocity of the Japanese forces defending Tarawa resulted in a surprisingly high U.S. casualty rate. During combat operations, 1,009 Marines were killed and 2,101 wounded. The Navy lost 646 Sailors when Liscome Bay was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine.
 
 
Thanks to CHINFO
Executive Summary:
National headlines include coverage of the wildfire in Northern California that has claimed the lives of at least 42 people and become the deadliest in state history, Amazon's decision to build additional main office buildings in Queens and Crystal City, and close midterm-election races in Florida and Arizona. Stars and Stripes reports that Adm. James Foggo spoke Sunday at Flanders Field American Cemetery in honor of the 100-year anniversary of the end of WWI. "Those who forged victory in World War I reach out in spirit to today's young patriots who are still fighting for freedom in distant lands, giving of themselves so that others may have a brighter future," said Foggo. Additionally, multiple outlets report that analysis of satellite images indicates that North Korea has continued to make improvements to clandestine missile sites despite recent diplomatic efforts.
 
Today in History November 13
1474

In the Swiss-Burgundian Wars, Swiss infantry shatters the army of Charles the Bold at Hericourt near Belfort, countering his march to Lorraine.
1835

Texans officially proclaim independence from Mexico, and calls itself the Lone Star Republic, after its flag, until its admission to the Union in 1845.
1851

The London-to-Paris telegraph begins operation.
1860

South Carolina's legislature calls a special convention to discuss secession from the Union.
1862

Lewis Carroll writes in his diary, "Began writing the fairy-tale of Alice--I hope to finish it by Christmas."
1878

New Mexico Governor Lew Wallace offers amnesty to many participants of the Lincoln County War, but not to gunfighter Billy the Kid.
1897

The first metal dirigible is flown from Tempelhof Field in Berlin.
1907

Paul Corno achieves the first helicopter flight.
1914

The brassiere, invented by Caresse Crosby, is patented.
1927

New York's Holland Tunnel officially opens for traffic.
1940

U.S. Supreme Court rules in Hansberry v. Lee that African Americans cannot be barred from white neighborhoods.
1941

A German U-boat, the U-81 torpedoes Great Britain's premier aircraft carrier, the HMS Ark Royal. The ship sinks the next day.
1942

Lt. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower flies to Algeria to conclude an agreement with French Admiral Jean Darlan..
1945

Charles de Gaulle is elected president of France.
1952

Harvard's Paul Zoll becomes the first man to use electric shock to treat cardiac arrest.
1956

The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously strikes down two Alabama laws requiring racial segregation on public buses.
1969

Anti-war protesters stage a symbolic "March Against Death" in Washington, DC.
1970

A powerful tropical cyclone strikes the Ganges Delta region of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), causing an estimated half-million deaths in a single night; the Bhola cyclone is regarded as the worst natural disaster of the 20th century.
1982

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial dedicated in Washington, DC.
1985

Some 23,000 people die when the Nevado del Ruiz erupts, melting a glacier and causing a massive mudslide that buries Armero, Columbia.
1989

Compact of Free Association: the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau—places US troops wrested from Japanese control in WWII—become sovereign nations, associated states of the United States.
1989

Hans-Adam II becomes Prince of Liechtenstein (1989– ) upon the death of his father, Franz Joseph II.
2000

Articles of impeachment passed against Philippine President Joseph Estrada.
2001

US President George W. Bush signs an executive order allowing military tribunals against foreigners suspected of connections to planned or actual terrorist acts against the US.
 
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Arlington Cemetery – Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – Tribute to the Sentinels
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Thanks to Micro
From the list 4858:  While politicians hold their positions in the safe confines of our nation's capital, protected by these same men and women, and receive full-pay retirement after serving five years. 
It's not true.  Federal elected officials are Federal employees and have exactly the same benefits as every other Federal employee.  If they're eligible for retirement, they may receive something when they retire, no sooner than age 55 and then only if they've served a total of 30 years in the government.  Otherwise, they get a small amount, dependent on their salary and years of employment, when they reach full retirement age.
The last time I looked it up, the average retirement income from Members of Congress and Senators was about $35,000 a year, as I recall.  Of course, some receive more, but most receive less.
Should military get more?  Of course.  At the very least, our military retirement should not be taxed, either Federally or by the States.  But that's a dream, not a reality.
Micro
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Thanks to Dr. Rich
 
The Untold Story of NotPetya, the Most Devastating Cyber-attack in History ..
 
Andy Greenberg (@a_greenberg) is a WIRED senior writer. This story is excerpted from his book Sandwormforthcoming from Doubleday.
 
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This history of WWI is long but very interesting and informative.
 
The Tragedy of America's Entry into World War I | Mises Wire
Thanks to THE Bear -  
Dutch... A masterpiece... American history applied to relevant current events to produce a viable foreign policy for 21st century America... I hope Trump and his National Security team take time to read and heed... Bear
mises.org
This week some 80 world dignitaries including Presidents Putin, Trump, and Chancellor Merkel are gathering in France to mark the culmination of year-long remembrances of the centenary of the end of "the Great War" on November 11, 1918 – later labeled and known to every American high school ...
 
 
 
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Item Number:3
Date: 11/13/2018
ISRAEL - 7 KILLED AS BOTH SIDES EXCHANGES STRIKES IN GAZA (NOV 13/NBC)NBC NEWS -- At least six Palestinians and one Israeli have been killed in the
wake of an Israeli raid in the Gaza Strip, reports NBC News.
Since Monday, the Hamas militant group has launched at least 400 rockets and
mortars from Gaza. A rocket hit a residential building in Ashkelon, 8 miles
(13 km) from Gaza, killing an Israeli civilian.
Hamas also carried out a surprise attack with a Kornet anti-tank missile on
an Israeli military bus, reported Haaretz (Israel). One soldier was wounded
in the attack, said the Israeli military.
Israeli aircraft hit at least 150 targets inside the Gaza Strip, including
staging sites for rocket launches and the headquarters of the Hamas-run
Al-Aqsa television station.
Violence has escalated since an Israeli special operation in southern Gaza on
Sunday resulted in the deaths of seven Palestinians and one Israeli soldier.
Ongoing talks with mediators to reach a peace agreement with the militant
group have been suspended as a result of the violence, an Israeli official
told the Jerusalem Post.
On Tuesday, Palestinian factions agreed to a cease-fire at Egypt's
request, according to Palestinian reports cited by Haaretz. Officials from
the U.N. and Egypt are scheduled to visit Gaza on Wednesday.
Item Number:5 Date: 11/13/2018
NORTH KOREA - IMAGERY SHOWS CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT AT BALLISTIC MISSILE SITES (NOV 13/NYT)NEW YORK TIMES -- North Korea is continuing to upgrade its ballistic missile facilities, according to commercial satellite imagery cited by the New York Times.
Sixteen secret bases were identified in a study published on Monday by the
Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.
The report focuses on Sakkanmol, an undeclared missile base used to launch
short-range ballistic missiles (SRBMs) located about 50 miles (80 km) north
of the Demilitarized Zone.
The site contains at least seven tunnels, which can accommodate up to 18
transporters. While the site is believed to be designated for SRBMs, it could
easily accommodate longer-range medium-range ballistic missiles, the authors
say. In a crisis, the missiles would be transported to a pre-arranged launching
site, where they could be made ready to fire in less than an hour.
It is one of up to 20 sites where North Korea continues to develop nuclear
missiles, says the report.
Any missile at the bases shown in the images could be fitted with a nuclear
warhead, says the study.
A spokesman for the South Korean president said that the report did not
provide any new information and emphasized that Pyongyang had not promised to
dismantle its missile bases.
Monitoring North Korean missile sites is inconsistent, with U.S. satellites
observing the sites less than 30 percent of the time, according to
unclassified estimates.
Item Number:6 Date: 11/13/2018
RUSSIA - KUZNETSOV CARRIER SUFFERED MINIMAL DAMAGE FROM CRANE, SAYS OFFICIAL (NOV 13/TASS)
TASS -- Defense officials say Russia's only aircraft carrier sustained no
serious damage when a crane fell on its deck late last month, reports
Russia's Tass news agency.
Preliminary inspections have not revealed any signs of substantial damage to
the Admiral Kuznetsov, First Deputy Defense Minister Ruslan Tsalikov said
during a conference call on Tuesday.
The timeline for repairs is unlikely to be affected by the Oct. 30 incident,
when the PD-50 floating dock sank after a power disruption, sending two
cranes crashing into the carrier's deck.
Reports at the time suggested the ship suffered significant damage to its
deck. On Nov. 7, the head of the United Shipbuilding Corp., told Tass that the
carrier is the only ship in the fleet which must be repaired using a floating
dock. The loss of the PD-50 creates certain "inconveniences," he said.
The carrier has since been transported to the 35th Ship Repair Factory, where
work is continuing, said Tsalikov. The schedule has been adjusted and
won't affect the contracted timeline.
Previous reports indicated that the Admiral Kuznetsov would return to service
in 2021.
Item Number:9 Date: 11/13/2018
SYRIA - SDF RESUMES ANTI-ISIS FIGHT (NOV 13/CNN)
CABLE NEWS NETWORK -- Syrian Kurdish groups have resumed anti-ISIS operations
in eastern Syria, reports CNN.
The Kurdish and allied Arab fighters who make up the Syrian Democratic Forces
(SDF) resumed the final phase of operations to oust the terrorist group from
Syria, the SDF said on Sunday.
The decision came after allies called on the SDF to de-escalate and focus on
fighting ISIS.
Current efforts focus on eliminating ISIS from the eastern fringe of the
Euphrates River valley, where the terrorist group clings to small villages
and towns.
Anti-ISIS efforts were suspended on Nov. 1 due Turkish operations against the
SDF in northern Syria.
More than 600 ISIS militants and nearly 350 SDF fighters have been killed
since September, according to the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human
Rights, as cited by the National (E.A.E.).
Item Number:13 Date: 11/13/2018
USA - ARMY ADOPTS WWII-ERA UNIFORMS FOR EVERYDAY DRESS (NOV 13/MIL)MILITARY.COM -- The U.S. Army has adopted a version of the pinks and greens uniform worn during World War II as its new everyday dress uniform, reports
Military.com. The "Army Greens" uniform will become the everyday business-wear
uniform for all soldiers by 2028, an Army release said on Sunday.
The uniform will feature a belted jacket, khaki shirt and brown leather shoes
for men, while women will have the choice to wear a skirt or pants with
additional shoe options, the release said.
The initial prototype for the two-tone uniform was unveiled by Sgt. Maj. of
the Army Daniel Dailey in October 2017.
Dailey released the final version in November 2017, saying the uniform would
be a historically accurate representation of the uniform Gen. George Marshall
wore as chief of staff of the Army during World War II.
The adoption of the Army Greens is the second major dress uniform change in
the past five years. The service retired its green uniform in 2014, after 61
years in service, replacing it with a version of the Army dress blue uniform.
The Army Greens will be fielded to soldiers reporting to their first units as
early as the summer of 2020, with a mandatory wear date for all soldiers in
2028, the release said.
Item Number:14 Date: 11/13/2018
USA - SUPER HORNET CRASHES; 2ND MISHAP INVOLVING REAGAN CARRIER IN A MONTH (NOV 13/BUSINS) BUSINESS INSIDER -- A U.S. Navy fighter jet has crashed into the Philippine
Sea while conducting routine operations, reports the Business Insider.
On Monday, an F/A-18F Super Hornet, part of Carrier Air Wing 5 on the
aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan, experienced a mechanical issue that resulted
in both pilots ejecting, the U.S. Navy 7th Fleet said in a statement.
The pilots were recovered by a rescue aircraft based off the aircraft carrier
and are in good condition, the statement said.
An investigation has been launched to determine the cause of the crash.
The USS Ronald Reagan has resumed normal operations, the Navy said.
This is the second military aircraft incident aboard the Ronald Reagan in the
past 30 days.
On Oct. 19, a MH-60 Seahawk helicopter crashed onto the deck of the carrier,
injuring a dozen sailors.


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