Monday, June 25, 2018

TheList 4753

The List 4753     TGB


To All,
I hope that you all had a great weekend.
Regards,
Skip
This day in Naval History
June 25
1859—Though the U.S. is neutral in the Spanish-Opium War, Capt. Josiah Tattnall offers the use of the U.S. steamer Toey-Wan to the British and French during the Battle of Taku Forts to receive wounded and dead troops.
1917—During World War I, the first Navy convoy of troopships carrying the American Expeditionary Forces arrives in France. The 14 troopships depart on June 14 from New York, which includes the 5th Marine Regiment.
1942—USS Nautilus (SS 168) sinks the Japanese destroyer, Yamakaze, southeast of Yokosuka, Japan.
1950—North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the Korean War. Two days later, President Harry S. Truman supports the United Nation's call and authorizes US naval and air operations south of the 38th Parallel, Korea.
1956—Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King dies at Portsmouth Naval Hospital in New Hampshire.
 
 
Executive Summary:
National headlines continued to focus on the administration's immigration policy, as well as Turkish President Erdogan's re-election. The U.S. Navy identified the pilot of an Embraer A-29 Super Tucano who died on Friday in a crash at the White Sands Missile Range as Lt. Christopher Carey Short of Canandaigua, N.Y. reports USNI News. Short was participating in the Air Force's Light Attack Experiment that is testing the viability of low-cost attack aircraft replacing higher-cost assets for certain missions. The Associated Press reports that Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis will visit Beijing this week during heightened tensions between the U.S. and China. Additionally, USNI reported that the Navy and Marine Corps found that less experienced aviation maintenance crews have led to an increase in Class C mishaps.
 
 
Today in History June 25
841
Charles the Bald and Louis the German defeat Lothar at Fontenay.
1658
Aurangzeb proclaims himself emperor of the Moghuls in India.
1767
Mexican Indians riot as Jesuit priests are ordered home.
1857
Gustave Flaubert goes on trial for public immorality regarding his novel, Madame Bovary.
1862
The first day of the Seven Days' campaign begins with fighting at Oak Grove, Virginia.
1864
Union troops surrounding Petersburg, Virginia, begin building a mine tunnel underneath the Confederate lines.
1868
The U.S. Congress enacts legislation granting an eight-hour day to workers employed by the federal government.
1876
General George A. Custer and over 260 men of the Seventh Cavalry are wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at Little Bighorn in Montana.
1903
Marie Curie announces her discovery of radium.
1920
The Greeks take 8,000 Turkish prisoners in Smyrna.
1921
Samuel Gompers is elected head of the American Federation of Labor for the 40th time.
1941
Finland declares war on the Soviet Union.
1946
Ho Chi Minh travels to France for talks on Vietnamese independence.
1948
The Soviet Union tightens its blockade of Berlin by intercepting river barges heading for the city.
1950
North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the Korean War.
1959
The Cuban government seizes 2.35 million acres under a new agrarian reform law.
1962
The U.S. Supreme Court bans official prayers in public schools.
1964
President Lyndon Johnson orders 200 naval personnel to Mississippi to assist in finding three missing civil rights workers.
1973
White House Counsel John Dean admits President Richard Nixon took part in the Watergate cover-up.
1986
Congress approves $100 million in aid to the Contras fighting in Nicaragua.
 
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Monday Morning Humor from Al….I never knew that there was a Beatle's Day
 
Today, June 25 is World Beatles Day.  This holiday pays tribute to the Beatles and the impact they had on both music history and popular culture in general. Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison exploded into popularity in 1962, and went on to release a series of groundbreaking songs and albums throughout the next decade. Their first performance in the United States, at the Washington Coliseum in 1964, is still one of the most well-known concerts in U.S. history. World Beatles Day was founded in 2009 as a way to honor the Beatles' contribution to several genres of music, and their platform of peace, positivity, and enthusiasm. The Beatles' beloved hit, "All You Need Is Love," was first performed on British television on June 25, 1967, which is the reason for the holiday's date. Rather than shopping for Beatles products or promoting competition over who is the band's biggest fan, the holiday is intended to spark inspiration and reflection over the Beatles' positive messages.
If you like "Carpool Karaoke" I believe you will love the 24 minutes with Sir Paul McCartney at https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=13&v=QjvzCTqkBDQ
 How can you tell if you have an authentic Beatles shirt?
When it has a Ringo round the collar!
My dad is obsessive compulsive about his vinyl and owns every single Beatles record except for one.. I think he needs Help.
What does Yoko Ono and Ethiopians have in common?
They both live off of dead Beatles!
Beatles puns
If you straighten your hair, you're going to lose that curl.
Had far too much to drink last night but will you still need me when I'm sick to floor?
Everyone at the office gave the more complex problems to the Pagan to solve. They always let the Wiccan work it out.
When he spotted the underwater craft, you could hear him yell "Oh! Submarine!".
I took my harp to be checked out by the local instrument repairer, who has noticeably missing teeth. When I gave it to him he began to bite my harp along it's length! And the harp was as good as new! I asked him "What's the secret with the biting?" He replied "Harpiness is a worn gum!"
I had loads of Beatle puns but that was Yesterday . Now they'll be hard to Get Back
Which of the Beatles lives in Australia?  Dingo Starr
Which of the Beatles is always in a rush?  George Hurryson
Which of the Beatles is yellow and sour?  John Lemon
Which Beatles song is about their favorite vegetable?  Peas Please Me
What did Paul say when he saw a ghost in his bedroom?  I'm looking through you
Why did the chicken cross the road?
Because the Beatle made it look cool on the cover of Abbey Road.
The Mexican tribute band "The Beetles" have split.  Juan Lennon cited irreconcilable differences with Gringo Starr.
     On my way to work, I saw a guy beating his wife. He was hitting all over her and she was screaming. Ever since then I could not concentrate.
     He punched her in the stomach, as she lay on the ground. When I walked by, she cried "Won't you PLEASE help me?!"
     Ever since then I can't get the Beatles off my head.
And in the end the love you take Is equal to the love you make
Have a great week,
Al
 
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Incredible Room 7 – Hoa Lo Prison
Mac's Facts No. 45 (Room 7, Hanoi Hilton)
November 17, 2001
Note:  In late 2000, CAG Stockdale (Room 7 SRO) asked his old friend, By Fuller to provide a list of the roommates of Room 7, Hanoi Hilton as of Christmas 1970.  The roommates of this room were extraordinary, both at the time of incarceration, and then later in freedom. 
Room 7 had the first organized church service to be held in the prisons of North Vietnam.  Permission was asked for by Stockdale, and twice denied by the Camp Commander. The room was warned not to do it.  Room 7 decided to do it anyway.  They even had a choir. Their solemn service quickly caught the eye of the guards and authorities. Armed guards rushed into the room to break up the "ominous" unauthorized meeting.  Ringleaders, Risner, Coker and Rutledge were led out of the room with guards at each arm (they were headed for more Heartbreak Hotel, solitary confinement and lots of punishment).  Bud Day was the one who then jumped up on his bed and started to sing "The National Anthem" and "God Bless America."  The entire room burst into song.  Then Rooms Six, Five, Four, Three, Two and One joined in succession. These songs of pride and defiance were loud enough to be heard outside the 15-foot walls of the Hanoi Hilton. As Robbie marched out the door, his back straightened with pride.  He held his head high. 
Robbie later recalled his thoughts as his roommates burst out in song, "I felt like I was nine feet tall and could go bear hunting with a switch."   Thirty one years later, on November 16, 2001 a nine-foot tall bronze statue of Brigadier General Robinson Risner, USAF would be dedicated on the central plaza of the United States Air Force Academy.  To Bud Day (principal speaker), Ross Perot (the sponsor of the project), and dozens of Robbie's Room-Seven roommates at the ceremony, it seemed more fitting to call the statue "life size."
 
CAG, knowing what the V reaction would be, was heard to remark something to the effect, "Well, I guess we just can't stand prosperity."  Our camp, yet unnamed, from that moment on became known as "Camp Unity.  "The guards protested, but the songs continued.  Shortly thereafter, Vietnamese troops entered each room in force.  They had their hats secured with chinstraps in place, they had fixed bayonets, and they were mad!  They quickly backed the POWs against the walls with a bayonet in each POW's stomach.  The singing immediately ceased as the troops burst through the doors.  The V later claimed that they had put down a riot.  It wasn't a real riot, but it was a lot of fun until the soldiers entered the room.  Several roommates of Room 7 were jerked out the next day.  The next day, Orson Swindle in Room 6 tapped the following message on the wall:  "Damn, you'd have to get in line to get in trouble in that crowd!!"
Thanks to By Fuller for the gut work of putting together this Mac's Facts.  Paul Galanti and Mike McGrath assisted.
This historical document is dedicated to a fearless leader, Vice Admiral Jim Stockdale.  CAG, here's what the men of Room 7 accomplished:
Mac's Facts no. 45 (Room 7, Hanoi Hilton)
November 17, 2001
Note:  In late 2000, CAG Stockdale (Room 7 SRO) asked his old friend, By Fuller to provide a list of the roommates of Room 7, Hanoi Hilton as of Christmas 1970.  The roommates of this room were extraordinary, both at the time of incarceration, and then later in freedom. 
Room 7 had the first organized church service to be held in the prisons of North Vietnam.  Permission was asked for by Stockdale, and twice denied by the Camp Commander.  The room was warned not to do it.  Room 7 decided to do it anyway.  They even had a choir. Their solemn service quickly caught the eye of the guards and authorities.  Armed guards rushed into the room to break up the "ominous" unauthorized meeting.  Ringleaders, Risner, Coker and Rutledge were led out of the room with guards at each arm (they were headed for more Heartbreak Hotel, solitary confinement and lots of punishment).  Bud Day was the one who then jumped up on his bed and started to sing "The National Anthem" and "God Bless America."  The entire room burst into song.  Then Rooms Six, Five, Four, Three, Two and One joined in succession.These songs of pride and defiance were loud enough to be heard outside the 15-foot walls of the Hanoi Hilton. As Robbie marched out the door, his back straightened with pride.  He held his head high. 
Robbie later recalled his thoughts as his roommates burst out in song, "I felt like I was nine feet tall and could go bear hunting with a switch."   Thirty one years later, on November 16, 2001 a nine-foot tall bronze statue of Brigadier General Robinson Risner, USAF would be dedicated on the central plaza of the United States Air Force Academy.  To Bud Day (principal speaker), Ross Perot (the sponsor of the project), and dozens of Robbie's Room-Seven roommates at the ceremony, it seemed more fitting to call the statue "life size." Photos: Dedication of B/Gen Robbie Risner's Statue - USAFA 16-18 November 2001
CAG, knowing what the V reaction would be, was heard to remark something to the effect, "Well, I guess we just can't stand prosperity."  Our camp, yet unnamed, from that moment on became known as "Camp Unity." The guards protested, but the songs continued.  Shortly thereafter, Vietnamese troops entered each room in force.  They had their hats secured with chinstraps in place, they had fixed bayonets, and they were mad!  They quickly backed the POWs against the walls with a bayonet in each POW's stomach.  The singing immediately ceased as the troops burst through the doors.  The V later claimed that they had put down a riot.  It wasn't a real riot, but it was a lot of fun ntil the soldiers entered the room.  Several roommates of Room 7 were jerked out the next day.  The next day, Orson Swindle in Room 6 tapped the following message on the wall:  "Damn, you'd have to get in line to get in trouble in that crowd!!"
Thanks to By Fuller for the gut work of putting together this Mac's Facts.  Paul Galanti and Mike McGrath assisted. This historical document is dedicated to a fearless leader, Vice Admiral Jim Stockdale.  CAG, here's what the men of Room 7 accomplished:
Roster of "Room 7" on 26 December, 1970 (Hanoi Hilton):
Name:                                                  Shootdown rank:               Days captive:             
1.  Brady, Al                                       Cdr, USN                          2236
2.  Coker, George                                Lt (jg), USN                      2381
3.  Coskey, Ken                                  Cdr, USN                          1650
4.  Craner, Bob (Deceased)                 Maj, USAF                       1911
5.  Crayton, Render                            LCdr, USN                        2562
6.  Crow, Fred                                     LCol, USAF                      2170
7.  Crumpler, Carl                               LCol, USAF                      1713
8.  Daniels, Vern                                 Cdr, USN                          1966
9.  Daughtrey, Norlan                         Capt, USAF                      2751
10. Day, Bud                                      Maj, USAF                       2027
11. Denton, Jerry                                Cdr, USN                          2766
12. Doremus, Rob                               LCdr, USN                        2729
13. Dramesi, John                               Capt, USAF                      2163
14. Dunn, Howie (Deceased)              Maj, USMC                      2624
15. Fellowes, Jack                               LCdr, USN                        2381
16. Finlay, Jack                                   LCol, USAF                      1781
17. Franke, Bill                                   Cdr, USN                          2729
18. Fuller, By                                      Cdr, USN                          2060
19. Gillespie, Chuck (Deceased)         Cdr, USN                          1968
20. Guarino, Larry                              Maj, USAF                       2801
21. Gutterson, laird                             Maj, USAF                       1846
22. Hughes, Jim                                  LCol, USAF                      2130
23. James, Charlie                               Cdr, USN                          1761
24. Jenkins, Harry (Deceased)            Cdr, USN                          2648
25. Johnson, Sam                                Maj, USAF                       2494
26. Kasler, Jim                                    Maj, USAF                       2400
27. Kirk, Tom                                     LCol, USAF                      1964
28. Lamar, Jim                                    LCol, USAF                      2474
29. Larson, Swede                               LCol, USAF                      2130
30. Lawrence, Bill                               Cdr, USN                          2076
31. Ligon, Vern (Deceased)                 LCol, USAF                      1942
32. McCain, John                               LCdr, USN                        1966
33. McKnight, George                        Maj, USAF                       2655
34. Moore, Mel                                  Cdr, USN                          2185
35. Mulligan, Jim                                Cdr, USN                          2521
36. Pollard, Ben                                  Maj, USAF                       2120
37. Risner, Robbie                              LCol, USAF                      2706
38. Rivers, Wendy                              LCdr, USN                        2715
39. Rutledge, Howie (Deceased)         Cdr, USN                          2633
40. Schoeffel, Pete                              LCdr, USN                        1988
41. Shumaker, Bob                              LCdr, USN                        2923
42. Stockdale, Jim                               Cdr, USN                          2713
43. Stockman, Hervey                        LCol, USAF                      2093
44. Stratton, Dick                               LCdr, USN                        2250
45. Tanner, Nels                                 LCdr, USN                        2338
46. Webb, Ron                                    Capt, USAF                      2093
47. Gary Anderson (Deceased)            Lt (jg), USN                      2151
                                                            Total days in captivity:  108,116
                                                            Man-years in captivity:   296.21
Here's a brief history of the 47 men:
5  Made Admiral rank (Stockdale O-9, Lawrence O-9, Shumaker O-8, Denton O-8,
      Fuller O-8).
1   Made General rank (Risner O-7)
40   Others stayed in the military and attained the following ranks: (USMC 1 Col--Dunn; Navy 1 Cdr--Coker; AF 1 LCol--Daughtrey; AF 19 Colonels--Craner, Crow, Crumpler, Day, Dramesi, Finlay, Guarino, Gutterson, Hughes, Kasler, Johnson, Kirk, Lamar, Larson, Ligon, McKnight, Pollard, Stockman, & Webb; Navy 18 Captains--Brady, Coskey, Crayton, Daniels, Doremus, Fellowes, Franke, Gillespie, James, Jenkins, McCain, Moore, Mulligan, Rivers, Rutledge, Schoeffel, Stratton, & Tanner.  No. 47 yet to be determined.)
1      Became U.S. Congressmen (Johnson, Texas; McCain, Arizona).
2      Became U.S. Senators (Denton, Alabama; McCain, Arizona).
1      Was a Vice Presidential candidate (Stockdale).
1      Was a Presidential candidate (McCain).
2      Received the Medal of Honor (Stockdale, Day).  Day resumed his career as a lawyer.
3      Received the Navy Cross (Denton, Coker, Fuller).  (3 of the 4 POWs to receive this award were from this room.  Red McDaniel was the 4th  POW to receive the award).
4      Made escapes.  All were recaptured, all were tortured. (Dramesi, Coker, McKnight, Day).
2      Were jet aces from the Korea War (Risner: 9 kills in F-86; Kasler: 6 kills in F-86).
1      First pilot to fly over Russia in U-2 spy aircraft (Stockman).
1    Was shot down 4-15-1944 in Germany.  POW until April 1945.  26th mission in P-47 (Ligon)
1      Shot down 3 German planes during WW II.  Flying British aircraft (Guarino).  Flew 156 missions in Sicily, India, China and Indo-China.
1      Flew 62 missions in Korea War. Got credit for 1 kill, 1 damaged, 1 probable kill against
Mig ñ15s (Johnson).
7    Received the Air Force Cross (Kasler--3 awards; Risner--2 awards; Dramesi: 2 awards, Day, Kirk, Guarino & McKnight each received one award). 
4    Were Navy Test Pilots (Stockdale, Lawrence, Gillespie, & Franke).
1      Flew with the Thunderbirds (Johnson).
11   Were USNA graduates (Brady '51, Denton '47, Fellowes '56, Fuller '51, Gillespie '51, Lawrence '51, McCain '58, Rivers '52, Schoeffel '54, Shumaker '56, & Stockdale '47).
2      Were Landing Signal Officers (LSOs); (Stockdale, Tanner).
1      Escaped the B-52 community and got into combat flying the F-105G (Larson).
1    Has a daughter who is an astronaut, gone into space three times (789 hours).  She is presently in training as a crewmember of the International Space Station.  (Lawrence).         
1    Was a Navy Air Wing Commander (CAG): (Stockdale, (COMAIRGRU 16).
1      Commanded a Navy Carrier, USS America.  Later became Battle Group Commander ñCARGRU 4 Commander (Fuller).
10   Were Squadron Commanders (Coskey (VA-85), Day (TBD), Denton (VA-75), Franke, Fuller (VA-76), Gillespie, Jenkins VA-163), Lawrence (VF-143), Ligon (11th TRS) and Larson (469th TFS) when shot down), Schoeffel (VA-83).
5      Were Squadron Executive Officers (Daniels, Moore, Mulligan, Rutledge, & Brady).  They were shot down before they could make Squadron Commander.
10   Authored books:
a.     Day: Return With Honor.
b.     Denton: When Hell Was In Session.
c.     Dramesi: Code of Honor.
d.     Guarino: A POW's Story: 2801 Days in Hanoi.
e.     Johnson: Captive Warriors: A Vietnam POW's Story.
f.      McCain: Faith of My Fathers.
g.     Mulligan: The Hanoi Commitment.
h.     Risner: The Passing of the Night.
i.      Rutledge: In the Presence of Mine Enemies.
j.      Stockdale: Courage Under Fire; In Love and War; A Vietnam Experience; Thoughts of a Philosophical Fighter Pilot.
4    Became Presidents/Commandants/Superintendents of institutions of higher learning: (Stockdale: President of the Citidel and President of the Naval War College; Lawrence: Superintendent of the USNA; Shumaker: Superintendent of the Naval Postgraduate School; and Ö(TBD)Ö; Denton: Commandant of Armed Forces Staff College).
2      Built their own airplanes: (Jenkins: Long EZ; Shumaker: Glassair).Pollard  is currently flying sail planes.
1      Was the first active duty Naval Aviator to fly Mach II (Lawrence).
1      Was first Naval Aviator to land on an aircraft carrier in 0/0 fog with a newly developed Aircraft Carrier Landing System (Gillespie).  Yes, it was an emergency low fuel state!
2      Naval Aviators were in the final selection groups (before shootdown) for the Mercury Astronaut Program (Lawrence, Shumaker).
Many of the members of Room 7 either served during wars prior to Vietnam, or who saw combat in theatres other than Vietnam:
WW II:
Vern Ligon: USA Air Corps, 25 missions, P-47 pilot, POW in Stalag Luft 1, 1944-45, escaped once, recaptured.
Larry Guarino: USA Air Corps, 156 missions in Sicily, India, China and Indo-China.  Spitfires.
Hervey Stockman: USA Air Corps.  68 missions, P-51.
Jim Kasler: USA Air Corps, 7 missions as tail gunner, B-29.
Harry Jenkins & Gordon Larson were Navy V5 cadetsÖand Fred Crow was an Army Air Corps aviation  cadet when WW II ended.
Bud Day: Corporal, USMC, 30 months in south and central Pacific, April 1942-Nov 1945.
By Fuller and Carl Crumpler: Enlisted in US Navy summer of 1945.  Saw boot camp by the end of WW II.
Fred Crow and Al Brady: were Navy dependents at Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.
Korea:
Robby Risner: USAF, 108 missions, F-86.  Mig Ace with 9 kills.
Jim Kasler: USAF, 100 missions, F-86, Mig Ace with 6 kills.
Howie Rutledge:  USN, 200 missions, F9F-2 as a Flying Midshipman.
Harry Jenkins: Served aboard USS Fred T. Berry (DD-141) off coast of Korea.  Flying Midshipman.
Tom Kirk: Flew missions in Korea (we need more information from Tom).
Larry Guarino: USAF, Air Defense Alert missions.
Jim Lamar: USAF, 100 missions in F-80 and P-51.
Wendy Rivers: Served on a destroyer off the coast of Korea.
Laird Gutterson: USAF, flew 60 missions, P-51.
Verlyne Daniels: Flew AD-4 missions, March-August 1953.
Sam Johnson: USAF, flew 62 missions, F-86, 1 kill, 1 probable, 1 damaged against Mig 15s.
Bud Day: USAF, air defense missions, F-84s.
Bill Lawrence: (F2H-3) and By Fuller (F9F-5) arrived off the coast of Korea in October 1953.  They were flying off the USS Oriskany.  Too lateÖthe war was over!
Fred Crow: Had various commands stateside during the Korean War.
Carl Crumpler: Flew F-86s at George AFB.  War was over too soon for him to participate.           
     
(We need more information from the men of this room to continue this paper.  In particular, we need Air Force positions such as Wing Cdr, Base Cdr, Ops Officer, or other terms us Navy guys aren't familiar with.  Please submit corrections or additions to: mmcgrath62@earthlink.net). 
 
 
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Item Number:1 Date: 06/25/2018 AFGHANISTAN - TALIBAN OVERRUNS CHECKPOINTS IN WARDAK, CAPTURING AT LEAST 70 POLICE OFFICERS (JUN 25/LWJ)  LONG WAR JOURNAL -- The Taliban claims to have captured at least 70 Afghan policemen after overrunning several outposts in Wardak province, southwest of Kabul, according to the Long War Journal, a website that monitors militant activity.   In a statement published on June 23, the Taliban claimed to have overrun a military base, 13 police outposts and captured 72 policemen. "Dozens of the enemy suffered casualties," the Taliban said.   The militant group also said it destroyed six "tanks" in the encounter, which may have been U.S.-supplied Humvees., the website said.   Two members of the Wardak provincial council confirmed much of the Taliban account, according to Deutsche Welle. As many as 80 police may have been captured during the fighting, the councilmembers said.   The number of checkpoints and police captured suggested that there was some level of collusion with the Taliban, said the councilmembers.   Soldiers in the area said that reinforcements had not yet arrived but that army planes conducted airstrikes in the area on Sunday, reported Tolo News (Kabul). Troops said they were under siege for three days.   Wardak has seven districts, three of which are under Taliban control and three of which are contested, noted the Long War Journal.  
Item Number:3 Date: 06/25/2018 CHINA - ELECTROMAGNETIC RAILGUN TO BE READY BY 2025, ACCORDING TO U.S. INTELLIGENCE ESTIMATE (JUN 25/CNBC)  CNBC -- China is testing a warship-mounted electromagnetic railgun and that could be operational as soon as 2025, says a U.S. intelligence report cited by CNBC.   China is expected to be the first country to have an operational railgun. The U.S. is working on a prototype, but it remains years away from entering service.   China's railgun was initially revealed in 2011. It underwent testing in 2014 and was calibrated for extended ranges between 2015 and 2017, according to the report. By December 2017, the weapon was successfully mounted on a warship and began sea trials.   Railguns use electromagnetic energy instead of gunpowder to propel rounds. The Chinese weapons can hit targets 124 miles (200 km) away with rounds traveling at speeds up to 1.6 miles per second.   Intelligence estimates for the cost per round range from US$25,000 to US$50,000
Item Number:7 Date: 06/25/2018 ETHIOPIA - AUTHORITIES ARREST 30 IN DEADLY BLAST AT POLITICAL RALLY (JUN 25/ALJAZ)  AL JAZEERA -- Ethiopian authorities have arrested 30 suspects following a deadly weekend grenade attack in Addis Ababa, reports Al Jazeera (Qatar).   On Saturday, two people were killed and 156 injured when an explosive device went off at a crowded rally held by Prime Minister Ahmed Abiy in the middle of Addis Ababa.   Thirty suspects in the attack were arrested over the weekend, police said.   Nine police officers, including the deputy head of the Addis Ababa police commission, were also arrested for perceived security lapses that contributed to the attack, reported the news website.   No group has claimed responsibility. Abiy blamed the attack on unnamed "anti-peace forces."   The prime minister, who took office in April, has been pursuing reforms, including releasing jailed dissidents and liberalizing the economy. The moves are opposed by elements that had long held political and economic power in Ethiopia, analysts said.   Ethiopia also announced in early June that it would accept terms to a peace treaty with Eritrea, potentially ending a frozen conflict that has lasted more than 20 years.  
  Item Number:8 Date: 06/25/2018 INDIA - 2 LET MILITANTS KILLED, 1 CAPTURED IN SOUTHERN KASHMIR (JUN 25/PTI)  PRESS TRUST OF INDIA -- Two members of the Lashkar-e-Tayyiba (LeT) militant group have been killed and one captured following a confrontation in southern Kashmir, reports the Press Trust of India.   On Sunday, police were alerted to the presence of LeT militants in the Kulgam district, said police.   Security forces, which included local police, the paramilitary Central Reserve Police Force and army soldiers, cordoned off the suspect's house. The militants opened fire on security forces, who shot back.   Shakoor Dar, an LeT divisional commander, and another LeT fighter was killed in the exchange. A third militant surrendered.   A civilian was reportedly killed during the fighting, reported the Hindustan Times. Medical officials said he suffered a bullet injury in the chest.   Local youth protested the security operation, throwing stones at security personnel. The security forces employed tear gas in response. Many protesters were hospitalized after being hit by pellets and smoke shells, reported the Hindu.   Security forces have increased their operations in India-administered Kashmir ahead of the Amarnath pilgrimage, which begins on June 28
  Item Number:10 Date: 06/25/2018 MALI - 32 KILLED IN ETHNICALLY-MOTIVATED ATTACK IN MOPTI (JUN 25/AFP)  AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE -- At least 32 civilian members of the Fula ethnic group have been killed in an attack by a rival ethnic group in central Mali, reports Agence France-Presse.   On June 23, attackers ambushed the village of Koumaga in the central Mopti region, according to reports.   The attackers separated the ethnic Fula (also known as Fulani) before continuing the assault, said the head of a local association.   At least 32 people were killed in the attack, including children, and 10 more residents are missing, he said.   The attackers were dressed in the clothing of the Dozo hunters, said one local elected official. The Dozo are linked to the Dogon ethnic group, which has been fighting with Fula herders over access to land and water for the last three years.   A local Al-Qaida affiliate known as JNIM has been known to fight beside the Fulani in an effort to recruit members of the group, leading some to label all Fula as terrorists, including the Bambara and Dogon ethnic groups.   The Fula have accused the Malian military of supporting attacks against them in the name of counterterrorism, noted BBC News
  Item Number:12 Date: 06/25/2018 RUSSIA - RUSSIAN JETS HIT REBEL POSITIONS IN SOUTHWEST IN VIOLATION OF CEASE-FIRE (JUN 25/WSJ)  WALL STREET JOURNAL -- Russian jets have conducted airstrikes in southwestern Syria, breaking a cease-fire with the U.S. and Jordan, reports the Wall Street Journal.   The government of Damascus also launched barrel bombs and mortar shells into the cities of Deraa and Quneitra on Sunday as part of a renewed effort to push into the area, which has been under rebel control for much of the war.   At least five civilians were killed and a hospital and emergency response center was destroyed during the offensive, said local activists. Nearly 25 airstrikes were launched in Deraa province, according to the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, as cited by the National (Abu Dhabi).   A total of 23 civilians have been killed in opposition areas since regime forces stepped up attacks last week, the observatory said.   Leaflets were dropped on the area, demanding that rebels surrender and leave the area.   Pro-regime media indicated that several towns in the region had been captured.   A Jordanian official said his country would take all necessary steps to ensure its security and was in contact with all parties to the conflict.   An official with U.S. State Dept. criticized Russian forces for "flouting arrangements it has entered into with no regard for civilian lives."   The U.S. provided aid to some rebels in the area, including arms shipments managed by the CIA that ended last year.   However, rebel groups said that the U.S. sent them a message warning that they "should not base [their] decisions on the assumption or expectation of a military intervention" by the U.S., reported Reuters
Item Number:13 Date: 06/25/2018 SAUDI ARABIA - AIR DEFENSES INTERCEPT HOUTHI MISSILES LAUNCHED AT DEFENSE MINISTRY (JUN 25/ARAB)  ARAB NEWS -- Saudi Arabia says its air defenses have intercepted two missiles launched by Houthi rebels in Yemen, reports the Arab News (Riyadh).   On Sunday, residents of Riyadh said they heard six explosions and saw puffs of white smoke and flashes in the sky above the city.   There were no reports of injuries. Shrapnel fell in the city's diplomatic quarter, reported Reuters.   The Houthi rebel movement in Yemen claimed responsibility for the attack via their Al Masirah television station, claiming to have struck the Saudi Defense Ministry and other sites in the city.   A spokesman for the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen denied that the ministry had been hit.   The militant group has launched a number of ballistic missiles at Saudi Arabia in recent months, many of them targeting the cities of Jazan and Najran, near the Yemeni border
Item Number:14 Date: 06/25/2018 USA - AIR FORCE CONSIDERS UPGRADING B-52 EXTERNAL WEAPONS CAPABILITY (JUN 25/FG)  FLIGHTGLOBAL -- The U.S. Air Force released a request for information (RFI) last week seeking to increase the weight capacity of the external weapons pylons on its B-52 bombers, reports Flight Global.   The Stratofortress has four external pylons, each capable of supporting 5,000 pounds (2,270 kg). Two pylons per wing can be used together to support a single weapon weighing 10,000 pounds (4,540 kg).   The RFI calls for quadrupling those maximum weight limits to up to 20,000 pounds (9,070 kg) per pylon and 40,000 pounds (18,40 kg) per wing.   The 30,000 pound (13,610 kg) GBU-57 Massive Ordnance Penetrator, which was previously only able to be carried internally, could potentially be carried on the new pylons.   The new pylons could also support the 20,000 pound GBU-43 Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) weapon, which is too long to be supported within the internal bay, reported IHS Jane's Defence Weekly.   The Air Force is reportedly anticipating a three- to six-year timeline for engineering and development of the pylon
 
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