Sunday, December 31, 2017

TheList 4624




The List 4624
To All,
Happy New Year to all of you and especially to our band of Bubbas whose friendship and comradery forged on the flight deck of Aircraft carriers starting in the 60s and the regular gatherings at the Bubba Breakfasts over the last 30 plus years is personally treasured.
Skip
. This Day In Naval History - December 31
Dec. 31
1862—USS Monitor founders in a storm off Cape Hatteras, NC, and is lost. Ordinary Seaman John Jones of USS Rhode Island is awarded the Medal of Honor for his conduct while rescuing crewmen during the night.
1941—Adm. Chester W. Nimitz assumes command of U.S. Pacific Fleet.
1942—USS Essex (CV 9), the first of a new class of aircraft carriers, is commissioned at Norfolk, VA.
1943—USS Greenling (SS 213) sinks Japanese transport Shoho Maru southeast of Ponape and evades counterattacks by submarine chaser Ch 30.
1948—The last annual report by a Secretary of the Navy to Congress and the President is filed by Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan. Thereafter the Secretary of Defense reports annually to Congress. 
 
Jan. 1
1819—Smith Thompson takes office as the sixth Secretary of the Navy, serving until Aug. 31, 1823.
1943—USS Nautilus (SS 168) evacuated 29 civilians from Teop Island, Solomons.  Also on this date, USS Porpoise (SS 172) attacked a Japanese convoy and sank the freighter Renzan Maru off northeastern coast of Honshu, Japan.
1944—PBY aircraft sink Japanese cargo ship Kanaiyama Maru near Lorengau, Admiralities.
1944—USS Ray (SS 271) sinks a Japanese gunboat at the mouth of Ambon Bay, while USS Puffer (SS 268) attacks a Japanese convoy at the western entrance of the Mindanao Sea, sinking an army cargo ship. On the same day USS Herring (SS 233) attacks a Japanese convoy, sinking an aircraft transport ship 220 miles off Tokyo Bay.
1959—The U.S. Naval Observatory introduces a system of uniform atomic time using cesium beam atomic oscillators. This measurement is adopted as standard by the International Committee on Weights and Measures.
1962—Navy SEAL teams are established with Teams One and Two formed with personnel from Underwater Demolition Teams. 
 
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
2016 Today in History December 31
1775
George Washington orders recruiting officers to accept free blacks into the army.
1852
The richest year of the gold rush ends with $81.3 million in gold produced.
1862
Union General William Rosecrans' army repels two Confederate attacks at the Battle of Murfreesboro (Stone's River).
1910
John B. Moisant and Arch Hoxsey, two of America's foremost aviators, die in separate plane crashes.
1911
Helene Dutrieu wins the Femina aviation cup in Etampes. She sets a distance record for women at 158 miles.
1915
The Germans torpedo the British liner Persia without any warning killing 335 passengers.
1923
The Sahara is crossed by an automobile for the first time.
1930
Brewery heir Adolphus Busch is kidnapped.
1941
General MacArthur reports that U.S. lines in Manila have been pushed back by the Japanese.
1942
After five months of battle, Emperor Hirohito allows the Japanese commanders at Guadalcanal to retreat.
1944
Hungary declares war on Germany.
1965
California becomes the largest state in population.
1977
Cambodia breaks relations with Vietnam.
 
 
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Thanks to Dr. Rich and Trace Atkins
For all my Marine friends .
 
 
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
 
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
 
Happy New Year ladies
Thanks to Mike
Why Women Are So Special.

Mum and Dad were watching TV when

Mum said, "I'm tired, and it's
Getting late. I think I'll go to bed."
She went to the kitchen to make sandwiches for the next day's
Lunches. Rinsed out the popcorn bowls, took meat out of the
Freezer for supper the following evening, checked the cereal box
Levels, filled the sugar container, put spoons and bowls on the
Table and started the coffee pot for brewing the next morning.
She then put some wet clothes in the dryer, put a load of clothes
Into the washer, ironed a shirt and secured a loose button. She
Picked up the game pieces left on the table, put the phone back on
The charger and put the telephone book into the drawer.

She yawned and stretched and headed for the bedroom.
She stopped by the desk and wrote a note to the teacher, counted
Out some cash for the excursion and pulled a text book out from
Hiding under the chair. She signed a birthday card for a friend,
Addressed and stamped the envelope and wrote a quick note for the
Grocery store. She put both near her bag.
Mum then washed her face with 3 in 1 cleanser, put on her Night
Solution & age fighting moisturizer, brushed and flossed her teeth.
Dad called out, "I thought you were going to bed."
"I'm on my way," she said. She put some water into the dog's dish
And put the cat outside, then made sure the doors were locked and
The patio light was on.. She looked in on each of the kids and
Turned out their bedside lamps and radios, hung up a shirt, threw
Some dirty socks into the hamper, and had a brief conversation
With the one up still doing homework.
In her own room, she set the alarm; laid out clothing for the next
Day, straightened up the shoe rack. She added three things to her
6 most important things to do list. She said her prayers, and
Visualized the accomplishment of her goals.
About that time, Dad turned off the TV
And announced to no one in particular. "I'm going to bed." And he
Did...without another thought.
Anything extraordinary here? Wonder why women live longer...?
'CAUSE THEY ARE MADE FOR THE LONG HAUL.........
(and they can't die sooner, they still have things to do!!!!)
Send this to five phenomenal women today...they' ll love you for it!
And Forward this to as many men as you can so that they know why
Women are so special :) ..........!
God's very own creation! :)
 
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Thanks to Dutch….I saw Herman at Walmart the other day
Grandfather of the Year
A woman in
a supermarket is following a grandfather and his
badly-behaved grandson. He has his hands full with the child
screaming for candy, cookies, all sorts of
things.
The grandpa
is saying in a controlled voice: "Easy, William, we won't be
long—easy, boy." The boy has another outburst and she hears
the grandpa calmly say: "It's okay, William. Just a couple
more minutes and we'll be out of here. Hang in there,
son."
At the
checkout the little horror is throwing items out of the
shopping cart. Grandpa says again in a controlled voice,
"William, William, relax buddy, don't get upset. We'll be
home in five minutes, stay cool,
William."
Very
impressed, she goes outside to where the grandfather is
loading his groceries and the boy into the car. She
says:  "It's none of my business, but you were amazing
in there. I don't know how you did it. That whole time you
kept your composure, and no matter how loud and disruptive
he got, you just calmly kept saying things would be
okay.  William is very lucky to have you as his
grandpa."
"Thanks,"
says the grandpa, "but I am William. This little b!@#$%d's
name is
Herman."
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Thanks to Chuck
How Jimmy Stewart Became George Bailey - WSJ
 
How Jimmy Stewart Became George Bailey
The star of 'It's a Wonderful Life' struggled with his wartime memories
By
Robert Matzen
Updated Dec. 23, 2016 10:14 a.m. ET
General Martial Henri Valin, head of staff of French Air Forces, decorated the American Colonel and actor James Stewart with the Croix de Guerre with palm as a reward for exceptional service rendered for France's liberation on May 19, 1945, in France. Photo: Keystone-France/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images
Every year around Christmas, Americans stop to pay homage to what is perhaps our most beloved motion picture, "It's a Wonderful Life." The 1946 film may flicker in black and white, but it still manages to feel fresh in affirming the human spirit as we head into each new year.
Fans of the movie might assume that making such an uplifting tale was a joy for cast and crew. In truth, this story of redeeming angels was born in the devastating wake of World War II, and it starred an actor swatting away his own demons.
The first time that Jimmy Stewart appears on screen as George Bailey, the image freezes in close-up as two angelic figures discuss the character in voice-over. One says to the other, "I want you to take a good look at that face." It's something that all of us should do as we watch the film.
Stewart is supposed to be playing a young man in his early 20s, but the once-boyish 38-year-old had just returned the year before from fighting in Europe, and only makeup and careful lighting could give him a semblance of youth. More seriously, as we know from the testimony of those who worked with him in the military and in Hollywood in those years, Stewart was suffering from what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder.
After two years of subsisting largely on ice cream and peanut butter, he had only just begun to eat real food and keep it down. He had the shakes and at times flew into rages, and his sleep was interrupted by images of bombers burning in the sky and men tumbling to earth.
"It's a Wonderful Life" was Stewart's first picture after almost five years away, including 20 months on the front lines. As a squadron commander of B-24 heavy bombers, he flew his first combat mission to Germany on Dec. 13, 1943. He commanded 12 missions in his first two months and was almost shot down twice. The experience unnerved him enough that he spent time at the "flak farm," where fliers went to decompress after seeing too much combat.
It wasn't fear of losing his own life that had gotten to Stewart. It was his deeply ingrained perfectionism, which made him fear making the wrong split-second decision in German airspace while leading dozens of planes and hundreds of men in combat.
Filming "It's a Wonderful Life" found him back in Hollywood after surviving too many crash landings and close calls. In sunny Southern California, the land of make-believe, this suddenly middle-aged man faced other problems. A new crop of youthful leading men had emerged in his absence. He also faced a crisis of conscience, wondering if acting was a worthwhile profession after the gravity of his daily life in the military.
This back story may help to explain the remarkable emotional energy of "It's a Wonderful Life." Stewart's bordering-on-frantic performance was not just virtuoso acting. Co-star Donna Reed reported that both Stewart and the picture's director, Frank Capra, made the production difficult at times as they second-guessed how scenes were done.
And why not? Both men were desperate to re-establish themselves in a Hollywood that, they feared, had passed them by while they served in the military. "It's a Wonderful Life" is considered the picture that relaunched Stewart as a more serious, seasoned actor. But for him, making it was just one more trial by combat.
It was the veteran actor Lionel Barrymore—the movie's villain, Old Man Potter—who helped Stewart to claw his way back. When Stewart wondered aloud during production if acting was worth his time, Barrymore looked him in the eye and asked: Isn't entertaining people better than dropping bombs on them?
Stewart seems to have gotten the message. He was able to convey great joy and passion in the movie's closing scenes, shouting "Merry Christmas, Bedford Falls!" as he runs through the streets and saying with a wink to his guardian angel, as he turns heavenward, "Atta boy, Clarence."
Jimmy Stewart returned to Hollywood unsure if he would be able to continue his career as an actor. "It's a Wonderful Life" showed that he could. It arrives every December like a holiday card from a dear friend, a man who came home from war and found the beauty in peace.
Mr. Matzen is the author of "Mission: Jimmy Stewart and the Fight for Europe," published by GoodKnight Books.
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Thanks to Denny
Skip,
 
The List article on PTSD.  The Blue Angels Foundation blueangelsfoundation.org has been working with DR Bourke at the Research and Recognition Project for several years.  http://nlprandr.org.  They have a neurolinguistic protocol that teaches those with PTS to distance themselves from the incident or incidents without the use of drugs.  There now have been a number of clinical trials to establish this technique and now Walter Read and the VA are recognizing it.
 
Here is a short video of the first veteran we had Dr Bourke treat.  We flew him to San Diego to treat two men from Freedom Station to see for ourselves that it worked.
 
Happy New Year!
 
Denny
 
Take a look at this 4 minute video of a Blue Angels Foundation treated veteran……………it says it all.    https://vimeo.com/234260261/8f03d62c63

 
 
 
_______________________________________________

No comments:

Post a Comment