Friday, November 3, 2017

Fw: TheList 4579

The List 4579


To All
I hope that you all have a great weekend. Mine is off to a great start with a fantastic Bubba Breakfast
Regards,
Skip
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This Day In Naval History - November 3
1853: The frigate Constitution, as the flagship of the African Squadron under the command of Commodore Isaac Mayo captures American slaver, the schooner H. N. Gambrill 60 miles south of Congo River. This capture is Constitution's last prize.
 
1931 - Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10 hour flight out of NAS Lakehurst, NJ, carrying 207 persons, establishing a new record for the number of passengers carried into the air by a single craft.
1943 - Battleship Oklahoma, sunk at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, is refloated.
1956 - USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip.
1956 - USS Chilton (APA-38), USS Thuban (AKA-19), and USS Fort Snelling
(LSD-30) evacuate more than 1,500 U.S. and foreign nationals from Egypt and Israel because of the fighting.
1961 - After Hurricane Hattie, helicopters from USS Antietam begin relief operations at British Honduras providing medical personnel, medical supplies, general supplies, and water.
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American Minute for November 3rd:
    In a Radio Address, NOVEMBER 3, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge stated:
"I therefore urge upon all the voters of our country, without reference to party, that they assemble...at their respective voting places in the exercise of the high office of American citizenship, that they approach the ballot box in the spirit that they would approach a sacrament, and there, disregarding all appeals to passion and prejudice, dedicate themselves truly and wholly to the welfare of their country."
Calvin Coolidge continued: "When an election is so held, it...sustains the belief that the voice of the people is the voice of God."
 
This Day In Naval History - November 4
1943 - PB4Y's sink the Japanese stores ship Minato Mau 19 miles off Ocean Island.
 
1967 - Landing craft from USS Navarro (APA-215) rescue 43 men from British SS Habib Marikar aground on a reef at Lincoln Island in the Tonkin Gulf.
1971 - USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile.
 
American Minute for November 4th:
    United States Senator Charles Carroll was unique. He was the only Roman Catholic to sign the Declaration of Independence and he outlived all the other signers. At his death, Charles Carroll was considered the wealthiest citizen in America. His statue was chosen to represent the State of Maryland in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall. Charles' cousin, John Carroll, founded Georgetown University and was the United States' first Catholic Bishop. Another cousin, U.S. Congressman Daniel Carroll, gave much of the land where the U.S. Capitol is located and was one of two Catholics to sign the U.S. Constitution. Charles Carroll's nephew, Robert Brent, was the first mayor of Washington, D.C., being reappointed by Jefferson and Madison. In a letter to James McHenry, the signer of the Constitution for whom Fort McHenry was named, Charles Carroll wrote on NOVEMBER 4, 1800:
"Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time." Carroll
continued: "They therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime and pure and which insures to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments."
 
This Day In Naval History - November 5
1775 - Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy.
1915: Lt. Cmdr. Henry C. Mustin, in an AB-2 flying boat, makes the first underway catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina (ACR 12) at Pensacola Bay, Fla. This experimental work leads to the use of catapults on battleships and cruisers through World War II and to the steam catapults on present-day aircraft carriers.
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1917 - German submarine torpedoes USS Alcedo off French coast.
1923 - Tests designed to prove the feasibility of launching a small seaplane from a submarine occur at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board USS S-1, was removed and assembled.
Then the submarine submerged allowing the plane to float free and take off.
1944 - TF 38 (Vice Admiral John S. McCain) begins 2 days of carrier strikes on Luzon, Philippines.
1945 - Ensign Jake C. West (VF-41) makes first jet landing on board a carrier, USS Wake Island (CVE-65) .
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2016 Today in History November 3
1493
Christopher Columbus arrives at the Caribbee Isles (Dominica) during his second expedition.
1507
Leonardo da Vinci is commissioned to paint Lisa Gherardini ("Mona Lisa").
1529
The first parliament for five years opens in England and the Commons put forward bills against abuses amongst the clergy and in the church courts.
1794
Thomas Paine is released from a Parisian jail with help from the American ambassador James Monroe. He was arrested for having offended the Robespierre faction.
1813
American troops destroy the Indian village of Tallushatchee in the Mississippi Valley.
1868
Ulysses S. Grant elected the 18th president of the United States.
1883
A poorly trained Egyptian army, led by British General William Hicks, marches toward El Obeid in the Sudan--straight into a Mahdist ambush and massacre.
1883
The U.S. Supreme Court declares American Indians to be "dependent aliens."
1892
First automatic telephone exchange goes into operation in La Porte, Indiana.
1896
William McKinley is elected 25th president of the United States.
1912
The first all-metal plane flies near Issy, France, piloted by Ponche and Prinard.
1918
The German fleet at Kiel mutinies. This is the first act leading to Germany's capitulation in World War I.
1921
Milk drivers on strike dump thousands of gallons of milk onto New York City's streets.
1935
Left-wing groups in France form the Socialist and Republican Union.
1957
The Soviet Union launches Sputnik II with the dog Laika, the first animal in space, aboard.
1964
For the first time residents of Washington, D.C., are allowed to vote in a presidential election.
1964
Lyndon B. Johnson is elected the 36th president of the United States.
1964
Robert Kennedy, brother of the slain president, is elected as a senator from New York.
1967
The Battle of Dak To begins in Vietnam's Central Highlands; actually a series of engagements, the battle would continue through Nov. 22.
1969
US President Richard Nixon, speaking on TV and radio, asks the "silent majority" of the American people to support his policies and the continuing war effort in Vietnam.
1973
NASA launches Mariner 10, which will become the first probe to reach Mercury.
1979
Ku Klux Klansmen and neo-Nazis kill 5 and wound 7 members of the Communist Workers Party during a "Death to the Klan" rally in Greensboro, NC; the incident becomes known as the Greensboro Massacre.
1983
Jesse Jackson announces his candidacy for the office of president of the United States.
1986
The Lebanese magazine Ash-Shiraa reports the US has secretly been selling weapons to Iran in order to secure the release of 7 American hostages being held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon.
1992
Arkansas Governor Bill (William Jefferson) Clinton is elected 42nd president of the United States.
1997
US imposes economic sanctions against Sudan in response to human rights abuses and support of Islamic extremist groups.
 
 
 
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This is such a travesty on so many levels…..skip…..
 
Our world is upside down – Dutch
 
 
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Then this came in and you realize there are still unbelievable people in this world
A great story - Thanks to Tam -
Time for another AWESOME positive story 🇺🇸
Tam

A Green Beret returned home from Afghanistan to face one of the most important missions of his life

 
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Thanks to THE Bear, Bud  and JC
Bud... Thanks for passing... This historic event has special meaning for me... 
     When the VFW convened their annual convention in Las Vegas that year they wanted to recognize the Navy F14 heroes from the Gulf of Sidra as one of their five annual award winners... The event was held in the Las Vegas convention Center in front of 25,000 delegates and a national TV audience... Dick Cheney was another awardee and the other three were heroic cops and a fireman... 
     Unfortunately for Kleeman, et al, their identifies were being withheld to protect them from retribution by Libyan terrorists and they were withheld from attending. The VFW and the Navy solved the problem. The Navy sent an expendable admiral from the Pentagon to accept the F14 guys plaque and honors ... Most expendable?... An attack puke... Bear Taylor...
     Tough duty...I got a weekend In Vegas and I got to sit on the stage and chat with one of my favorite people-- SecDef -- not--and then accept a plaque, honors and a rousing standing ovation on behalf of the unnamed F14 sharpshooters... 
     Anything for fighter brothers of brave heart and fighting spirit...  Bear🇺🇸⚓️🐻
     PS... I still have a 3" button with the message: "Libya -- 0, F14 -- 2"
On Nov 3, 2015, at 7:25 PM, Bud wrote:
 
One of the pilots was Hank Kleeman who was previously in VF-32 sister squadron to mine VF-14. He later died landing at Miramar when his F-18 had that main mount issue and the bird turned upside down on landing.
 
From the net…courtesy of Roger…
 
 
Published on Oct 29, 2015
1989 Gulf of Sidra encounter between two F-14 Tomcats of the USS John F. Kennedy and two MiG-23 Floggers of Libya. Unsurprisingly, the Tomcats come out on top.
 
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Item Number:1 Date: 11/03/2017 AUSTRALIA - JUDGE SENTENCES 'DEVOUT TERRORIST' TO MAXIMUM JAIL SENTENCE OF 22.5 YEARS (NOV 03/SMH)  SYDNEY MORNING HERALD -- An Australian man who plead guilty to conspiring to commit a terrorist attack has received the maximum jail sentence allowed, reports the Sydney Morning Herald (Australia).   Sulayman Khalid, 22, was sentenced Friday to 22 years and six months; he will be eligible for parole after 16 years and nine months, said the Supreme Court of New South Wales.   Authorities said Khalid led a group of four as they plotted attacks on a police station, federal police building and jail in the Australian capital of Sydney.   During the sentencing hearing, the judge called Khalid "a devout terrorist."   Four other men also plead guilty to charges stemming from the planned attack.  
  Item Number:2 Date: 11/03/2017 CANADA - OTTAWA REQUESTS LATEST U.S. AMRAAM MISSILES FOR RCAF (NOV 03/DSCA)  U.S. DEFENSE SECURITY COOPERATION AGENCY -- The U.S. State Dept. has approved a potential Foreign Military Sale of anti-aircraft missiles to Canada, reports the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency.   The proposed US$140 million deal covers up to 32 AIM-120D AMRAAMs; 18 AMRAAM captive air-training missiles; four AMRAAM airborne instrumentation units; two AMRAAM instrumented test vehicles; seven spare AMRAAM guidance units; and four spare AMRAAM control sections, according to the agency.   The Canadian government has requested a letter of offer and acceptance for the missile procurement.   Also included in the possible sale are containers; training; training aids and equipment; spare and repair parts; and associated technical and logistics support, said the DSCA on Nov. 1.   The missiles will be used to enable Royal Canadian Air Force fighters to fulfill both North American Aerospace Defense (NORAD) and NATO missions and meets U.S. Northern Command's goal for combined air operations interoperability and standardization between U.S. and Canadian forces, said the agency
  Item Number:3 Date: 11/03/2017 GERMANY - LOCKHEED TO UPDATE GERMAN NAVY'S P-3C ORION PATROL AIRCRAFT (NOV 03/LM)  LOCKHEED MARTIN -- Lockheed Martin says it has been awarded a contract for the second phase of the German navy's P-3C mission system refresh program.   The deal, worth US$158.5 million, covers the modernization of the mission system processing suites on Germany's eight P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft, said a Lockheed release on Nov. 1.   The upgrades will allow the aircraft to operate through 2035, noted the release.   The mission system refresh is part of a larger update that includes structural mid-life upgrades as well as improvements to the instrument flight rules cockpit capability.   The latest project includes the design, development, manufacture, integration, installation and test of the Lockheed Martin Airborne Tactical Mission System.   The new system is an open architecture, Java-based system that provides advanced software programs as well as core mission system processing, display and control components.   The mission system refresh also includes the Airborne Rack-Mounted Commercial Portable Processor (AR-C2P) for acoustic processing, said Lockheed.   Work under the contract is scheduled to be completed in 2022
Item Number:4 Date: 11/03/2017 INDIA - NAVY HELICOPTER PROJECT, WORTH $US3.2 BILLION, TAKES MAJOR STEP (NOV 03/PTI)  PRESS TRUST OF INDIA -- India's Defense Acquisition Council has authorized funding for the procurement of 111 multi-role helicopters for the navy, reports the Press Trust of India.   The US$3.2 billion program will acquire helicopters capable of attack, search-and-rescue, surveillance and medical evacuation operations.   The purchase is expected to help fill a major capability gap for the Indian navy, which currently relies on aging French-designed Chetak helicopters.   The government will identify a foreign defense contractor and a local defense firm to develop the new helicopters in a joint partnership
  Item Number:5 Date: 11/03/2017 IRAQ - ASSAULT ON QAIM CONTINUES, WITH PRO-GOVERNMENT FORCES ENTERING CITY HELD BY ISIS (NOV 03/AFP)  AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE -- Iraqi pro-government forces have entered the city of Qaim in Iraq's Anbar province, one of the last Islamic State strongholds in the country, reports Agence France-Presse.   Friday's actions were supported by artillery fire and Iraqi and U.S. coalition airstrikes. The elite Counter Terrorism Service began the action by taking city's Gaza neighborhood, said an Iraqi source.   Qaim lies on the Syrian border. Government forces in both Iraq and Syria have been battling ISIS from either side in the region.   About 1,500 ISIS militants remain in the city of 150,000, according to the U.S.-led coalition
  Item Number:6 Date: 11/03/2017 LIBYA - GENERAL BLASTS INTERNATIONAL INTERVENTION, PROMPTING GOVERNMENT HEAD TO PROBE 'IRRESPONSIBLE' COMMENTS (NOV 03/LIBHER)  LIBYA HERALD -- The head of Libya's internationally recognized government has ordered investigations into statements made by a senior commander threatening other regional nations, reports Libya Herald.   On Friday, Fayez Serraj called on military prosecutors to investigate controversial statements made by Brigadier Mohamed Gnaidi.   In an interview earlier in the week that was televised, Gnaidi said that Libyan forces might be forced to take action against Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia if they continued to intervene in Libya. Those countries back a rival government based in Tobruk, in eastern Libya.   The brigadier also said that Serraj should respond forcefully or leave his position. Serraj is the president of the Presidency Council of the Government of National Accord (GNA).   The president said the statement was "irresponsible."   Gnaidi's statements came after an airstrike on Tuesday in the eastern city of Derna that killed at least 15 civilians. Egyptian outlet Mada Masr reported that the strike was carried out by Egypt's air force, citing sources within the service.  
  Item Number:7 Date: 11/03/2017 NIGER - PM OK WITH U.S. DRONE STRIKES; I ASKED FOR THEM ALREADY, SAYS DEFENSE MINISTER (NOV 03/WSJ)  WALL STREET JOURNAL -- Nigerien Prime Minister Brigi Rafini says his government is open to allowing the United States to conduct strikes with unmanned aircraft against terror groups on its territory, reports the Wall Street Journal.   In an interview with the paper on Wednesday, the prime minister said there are no Islamist militant bases in Niger. He acknowledged that attackers could easily disappear into the local population.   U.S. military officials sought to send an armed drone to support the U.S. mission that ended in an ambush in early October that killed four Green Berets, but the request did not make it through the various levels of bureaucracy, noted the paper.   Also on Wednesday, Niger's Defense Minister Kalla Mountari had an interview with Reuters in his office. The minister said he had asked American officials "some weeks ago to arm them (the drones) and use them as needed."   Washington operates MQ-9 Reapers from a base in Niger in support of counterterrorism missions around the region.   Meanwhile, operations at a new drone base in central Niger will be delayed until mid-to-late 2018 due to dust storms and logistics issues that have hindered construction, reported the Stars and Stripes.   Work at the Agadez facility was previously expected to be completed this year, said U.S. Africa Command officials.   The base will eventually be a hub for U.S. surveillance operations in the region
Item Number:8 Date: 11/03/2017 NORTH KOREA - REGIME SEEN DEVELOPING ADVANCED KN-20 ICBM ABLE TO HIT U.S. (NOV 03/CNN)  CABLE NEWS NETWORK -- A U.S. official says North Korea is working on an improved version of its existing KN-20 intercontinental ballistic missile (IBCM) that has the potential to reach the United States, reports CNN.   The newly assessed missile is part of an accelerated effort by Pyongyang to rapidly upgrade the weapon and nuclear attack capability, according to U.S. officials familiar with the North Korean program.   The improvements are said to be forcing Washington to re-evaluate the timing of such a missile strike threat and the need to update response options.   Upgrading is underway for North Korea's nuclear fuel, missile launchers, guidance and targeting systems as well, the officials told CNN.   Some experts believe that the North could be able to put a miniaturized nuclear warhead on top of an ICBM in 2018.  
  Item Number:9 Date: 11/03/2017 SOUTH KOREA - AMERICAN BOMBERS, ALONG WITH JAPANESE, S. KOREAN JETS HOLD EXERCISE; N. KOREA CALLS IT 'NUCLEAR STRIKE DRILL' (NOV 03/WSJ)  WALL STREET JOURNAL -- U.S., Japanese and South Korean aircraft have been drilling near the Korean peninsula, angering North Korea, reports the Wall Street Journal.   On Thursday, two U.S. B-1B bombers flew from Guam and took part in the drill with Japanese and South Korean jets over the Pilsung Range training area in central South Korea.   North Korean media called the exercise a "surprise nuclear strike drill" and criticized the U.S. for "aggravating the situation," reports Reuters.   State-run KCNA said the "gangster-like U.S. imperialists are ceaselessly resorting to their frantic nuclear threat and blackmail to stifle" North Korea.   U.S. Pacific Command said in a statement that the exercises were planned in advance and were not in response to any current event
  Item Number:10 Date: 11/03/2017 SYRIA - ARMY, ALLIES TAKE DEIR EZZOR CITY FROM ISIS (NOV 03/DEWELLE)  DEUTSCHE WELLE -- The Syrian army says it has seized the city of Deir Ezzor from the Islamic State, reports Deutsche Welle, citing Syrian state television.   SANA, the state news agency, said: "The armed forces, in cooperation with allied forces, liberated the city" on Friday.   Other sources said the army and its allies were still clearing the final pockets of ISIS resistance, noted the BBC.   This development comes after a two-month campaign. In September, pro-government forces broke a three-year siege of the city laid by the terrorist group and launched an operation to retake it.   Deir Ezzor province is oil-rich provinces and the last place in Syria where Islamic State still holds significant territory
Item Number:11 Date: 11/03/2017 TURKEY - DOZENS DIE IN CLASHES INVOLVING PKK, SECURITY FORCES (NOV 03/DHA)  DOGAN NEWS AGENCY -- Clashes between Turkish security forces and the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) have left at least 39 people dead in Turkey's southeastern Hakkari province and eastern Tunceli province, reports the Dogan News Agency (Turkey).   Fighting broke out near the Semdinli district of Hakkari on Nov. 2 after the security forces observed a group of PKK militants who were allegedly preparing to launch an attack in the Ortaklar region, said the Turkish General Staff.   Six soldiers and two village guards were killed and another two soldiers were injured in the battle.   Five PKK fighters were immediately "neutralized" in the clashes, the Turkish military said. The Turkish government uses the term "neutralized" to refer to militants who were killed, wounded or captured.   President Recep Tayyip Erdogan later said that 22 PKK militants had been killed in the clashes, which he said were continuing.   The Interior Ministry issued a statement that said a total of 31 PKK fighters were neutralized in fighting in Hakkari, Tunceli and the southeastern Sirnak province. A later ministry statement put that number at 46
Item Number:12 Date: 11/03/2017 TURKEY - PKK, POLICE CLASH REPEATEDLY (NOV 03/ANADOLU)  ANADOLU NEWS AGENCY -- Turkish police say an officer has been killed as well as a suspected militant in a clash after a raid on an apartment in Diyarbakir in the southeastern part of the country, reports the state-run Anadolu Agency (Turkey).   Police raided the apartment Friday morning on the suspicion that it was being used by the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK). The occupants opened fire on the officers, injuring 10 police, one of them mortally, said officials.   The city is mainly Kurdish and considered the unofficial capital of Turkish Kurdistan.   On Thursday, eight Turkish soldiers and 46 militants were killed in three separate attacks elsewhere, reports Rudaw (Iraqi Kurdistan).   In the southeastern city of Semdinli, Hakkari province, 26 suspected PKK fighters were killed while crossing the border into Iraqi Kurdistan, said officials. Six police and two village guards were also reportedly killed in the clashes.   In the eastern province of Tunceli, Turkish authorities said that nine PKK terrorists were killed. Eleven PKK fighters reportedly died during air raids in the southeastern province of Sirnak.  
Item Number:13 Date: 11/03/2017 UNITED KINGDOM - PARTY WHIP WILLIAMSON, 41, BECOMES DEFENSE SECRETARY (NOV 03/GUARDIAN)  GUARDIAN -- British Prime Minister Theresa May has appointed the Conservative Party whip as defense secretary, reports the Guardian (U.K.).   Gavin Williamson, the MP for South Staffordshire, was named to the defense post on Thursday after Defense Secretary Michael Fallon resigned on Wednesday over sexual harassment allegations.   Williamson has been responsible for maintaining discipline within the prime minister's party since 2016.   He was also closely involved in negotiating the confidence and supply deal with the Democratic Unionist party, which secured the Parliamentary support May needed to govern following general elections in June.   The promotion of Williamson was not universally hailed by party MPs, noted the Financial Times (London). Some charged that move made the prime minister look weak since Williamson was the man who had advised her on Fallon's resignation.   Some Conservative MPs were said to be angered that a colleague with no ministerial experience had been promoted to the Cabinet, noted the BBC.   At 41, Williamson is 24 years younger than Fallon. He becomes the youngest British defense secretary since the post was created in World War II. He has no military experience
Item Number:14 Date: 11/03/2017 UNITED NATIONS - ISIS' ACTS IN IRAQI CITY OF MOSUL SEEN AS 'INTERNATIONAL CRIMES' (NOV 03/UNNC)  U.N. NEWS CENTER -- A United Nations report has concluded that "international crimes" were committed during the nine-month battle for Mosul in northern Iraq.   The new report, issued Thursday, calls for international trials for Islamic State militants, reports the U.N. News Center.   The report, issued by the U.N. Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, charges that ISIS committed crimes so serious and systematic that they rise to the level of crimes that violate international humanitarian norms and law.   Testimony gathered from eyewitnesses points to crimes that include the use of "human shields, killings of civilians, intentional shelling of civilians…and indiscriminate targeting of civilians trying to flee areas under is control," says the report.   According to the report, 2,521 civilians were killed during the nine-month operation to retake areas controlled by the group in Iraq. The report finds that 741 of those were executed.   Authorities have found 74 mass graves in areas liberated from the group since 2014, says the report.  
  Item Number:15 Date: 11/03/2017 USA - AGE OF NAVY SUPPORT SHIPS WORRISOME, SAYS GAO (NOV 03/S&S)  STARS AND STRIPES -- A new government watchdog report says that the Navy might have difficulties supporting its warships in combat unless it modernizes its aging fleet of supply ships, reports the Stars and Stripes.   The service must improve the support vessels to accommodate its growing combat fleet, which is responsible for larger areas, says a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report issued on Oct. 31. Without such upgrades, the ships might not be able to get vital supplies to warships as needed.   "Over 90 percent of the equipment, personnel, fuel and other cargo necessary to sustain a major conflict is moved by sealift ships, but the readiness of the aging surge sealift fleet is trending downward," says the report.   The sealift fleet includes oilers, tankers and cargo ships, many of which are around 50 years old.   Navy officials agreed with the agency's recommendations and said the service was preparing a long-term plan with an estimated budget for expanding and upgrading the fleet.   The GAO maintains that the Navy has not spent enough time considering how support ships will accommodate combat vessels spread out over a wide area.   In the past, supply ships were generally part of a strike group that supported the warships as needed. Recently, however, those vessels have been sailing longer distances to meet ships at sea, notes the study.   Over the last five years, support ships have been experiencing more breakdowns than usual and maintenance work is lasting longer than planned, says the report
Item Number:16 Date: 11/03/2017 USA - FOREIGN MINISTER BLASTS WASHINGTON FOR 'DELIBERATELY LYING' ABOUT SONIC ATTACKS IN HAVANA (NOV 03/CBS)  CBS NEWS -- The Cuban government has rejected claims by Washington that U.S. diplomats came under sonic attacks in their Havana mission, reports CBS.   Speaking in Washington on Thursday, Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez said there is "no evidence whatsoever" to back up the U.S. claims. Rodriguez denied the incidents even occurred.   The minister said the U.S. was "deliberately lying" about the attacks.   Two dozen staffers at the U.S. Mission in Havana complained about ill health effects after having served in the country. Claims began to surface in December 2016. Some said they heard a strange sound before falling ill. Some have yet to recover.   Rodriguez also criticized the U.S. investigation into the matter, saying it had taken four months to send FBI investigators to Cuba. He also alleged that samples of the sound heard by diplomats were being purposely altered.   In September, Rodríguez pledged to cooperate into investigations of the mysterious ailments and expressed hope that the issue would not undermine relations
Item Number:17 Date: 11/03/2017 USA - LEGAL CHARGES POSSIBLE IN NAVAL COLLISIONS, SAYS CNO (NOV 03/WP)  WASHINGTON POST -- The U.S. Navy has indicated that it is considering bringing charges against negligent services members involved in two fatal collisions earlier this year, reports the Washington Post.   Adm. John M. Richardson, chief of naval operations, said in a news conference Thursday that he has assigned an admiral to serve as a consolidated authority for cases related to the collisions. Such authorities can oversee both administrative and legal cases.   In June, the guided-missile destroyer Fitzgerald collided with a commercial ship off the coast of Japan, killing seven sailors. A collision in August between the destroyer John S. McCain and a commercial tanker near Singapore led to the deaths of 10 more.   A report released earlier Thursday blamed judgement and training mistakes for the deadly collisions
Item Number:18 Date: 11/03/2017 USA - NEW NAVAL JAPAN-BASED UNIT TO MAKE SURE WARSHIPS READY FOR OPERATIONS (NOV 03/USNIN)  USNI NEWS -- The U.S. Navy has activated a new organization to oversee the training and certification of forward-deployed surface forces, reports USNI News.   The Commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet Detachment Naval Surface Group Western Pacific (CPF Det NSGWP) was activated on Oct. 31.   The detachment, based out of Japan, will determine if warships based there are ready for operations.   The U.S. 7th Fleet will assign ships that are forward-deployed to Japan to CPF Det NSGWP during maintenance availabilities and follow-on training, according to a release from U.S. Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet. The detachment will then ensure that the ships are ready for operational missions.   "I am forming CPF Detachment Naval Surface Group Western Pacific to address an organizational gap in FDNF-J [Forward Deployed Naval Forces-Japan] that allowed a culture to grow myopically focused on operations to the detriment of readiness," said Adm. Scott Swift, the U.S. Pacific Fleet commander.   The organization was created in response to four FDNF-J surface force incidents this year -- a grounding and three collisions. Seventeen sailors died in two of the collisions, noted USNI News.  
  Item Number:19 Date: 11/03/2017 USA - PLANNING BEFORE CONTINGENCY ARISES, ARMY BOOSTS READINESS OF PRE-POSITIONED GEAR (NOV 03/ARMY)  ARMY TIMES -- A top general says the U.S. Army has recently enhanced the readiness of its pre-positioned stocks of equipment around the world, making that gear ready for issue within 96 hours of a contingency, reports the Army Times.   An important part of this effort was finding ways to add "enablers" such as weapons and communications systems to pre-positioned equipment, Gen. Gustave Perna, the head of Army Materiel Command, told reporters on Nov. 1.   Previously, units would remove such items at their home station, box it up and ship it for reinstallation on the vehicles and platforms they linked up with in theater, the general said.   By adding the gear to pre-positioned stocks, soldiers can get ready for operations much faster, he noted
  Item Number:20 Date: 11/03/2017 YEMEN - HOUTHIS SHELL RESIDENTIAL TAIZ AREA, KILLING 5 CHILDREN (NOV 03/SABA)  SABA NEWS AGENCY -- Five children have been killed and three wounded in shelling by Houthi rebels in the outskirts of the southwestern city of Taiz, reports the state-run Saba News Agency (Yemen).   Houthi mortar rounds landed in a residential neighborhood of Taiz, which shares its name with the province, a local official told the China's Xinhua News agency. The shells landed on two houses, killing three in the first house and two in the second. Three others were critically injured, said the official.   The Shi'ite Houthi are supported by Iran and are battling a Saudi-led Arab coalition to restore ousted President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi.
 
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