Monday, August 14, 2017

Fw: TheList 4523

The List 4523


To All,
I hope you had a great weekend.
Regards,
Skip
 
This Day In Naval History - August 14
1813 - HMS Pelican captures USS Argus
1886 - The Secretary of the Navy William C. Whitney signs General Order 354 establishing the Naval Gun Factory at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C.
 
1945 - Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk during World War II (15 August in DC)
 
Today in History August 14
1457
The first book ever printed is published by a German astrologer named Faust. He is thrown in jail while trying to sell books in Paris. Authorities concluded that all the identical books meant Faust had dealt with the devil.
1559
Spanish explorer Tristan de Luna enters Pensacola Bay, Florida.
1605
The Popham expedition reaches the Sagadahoc River in present-day Maine and settles there.
1756
French commander Louis Montcalm takes Fort Oswego, New England, from the British.
1793
Republican troops in France lay siege to the city of Lyons.
1900
The European allies enter Beijing, relieving their besieged legations from the Chinese Boxers.
1917
The Chinese Parliament declares war on the Central Powers.
1942
Dwight D. Eisenhower is named the Anglo-American commander for Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa.
1945
1947
Pakistan becomes an independent country.
1969
British troops arrived Northern Ireland in response to sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics.
1973
The United States ends the "secret" bombing of Cambodia.
1987
Mark McGwire hits his 49th home run of the season, setting the major league home run record for a rookie.
1995
Shannon Faulker becomes the first female cadet in the long history of South Carolina's state military college, The Citadel. Her presence is met with intense resistance, reportedly including death threats, and she will leave the school a week later.
2007
Four coordinated suicide bomb attacks in Yazidi towns near Mosul, Iraq, kill more than 400 people.
2010
First-ever Summer Youth Olympic Games open, in Singapore. Athletes must be 14–18 years old.
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1945
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Monday Morning Humor from Al
Submitted by Norm Rech:
 
    Patty and I had no reservations at a busy restaurant; we were told there would be a two hour wait for a table.
     "Young man, we're both over 70 years old," I said. "We may not have two hours."
     We were seated immediately.
 
 
 
Submitted by Al Anderson:
 
     We went for a meal at a Chinese restaurant and ordered the "Chicken Surprise". The waiter brought the meal, served in a lidded cast iron pot.  Just as Patty was about to serve herself, the lid of the pot rose slightly and she briefly saw two beady little eyes looking around before the lid slammed back down.
     "Good grief, did you see that?" she asked me.
     I hadn't, so she asked me to look in the pot. I reached for it and again the lid rose, and I saw two little eyes looking around before it slammed down.
     Rather perturbed, I called the waiter over, explained what was happening, and demanded an explanation.
     "Please sir," said the waiter, "what you order?"
     I replied, "Chicken Surprise."
     "Ah...so sorry," said the waiter, "I bring you Peeking Duck"
           
 
 Submitted by Barbara Hunt:
 
     I took my wife to a restaurant. The waiter, for some reason, took my order first. "I'll have the strip steak, medium rare, please."
     He said, "Aren't you worried about the mad cow?"
     "Nah, she can order for herself."
     And that's when the fight started...
 
Submitted by Chuck Kincade:
 
     While on vacation, Patty and I stopped at a roadside restaurant for lunch. After finishing our meal, we left the restaurant and resumed our travel.
     When leaving, Patty unknowingly left her glasses on the table and she didn't miss them until we had been driving about twenty minutes. By then, to add to the aggravation, I had to travel quite a distance before I could find a place to turn around—in order to return to the restaurant to retrieve her glasses.
     All the way back, I became the classic grouchy old man.  I fussed and complained and scolded Patty relentlessly during the entire return drive. The more I chided her—the more agitated she became. I just wouldn't let up one minute. To Patty's relief, we finally arrived at the restaurant.
     As Patty got out of the car to hurry inside to retrieve her glasses, I yelled to her, "While you're in there, you might as well get my hat and the credit card."
 
Submitted by Holly Vanderpool:
 
     When I was a young and single lad, I was dining in a fancy restaurant and there is a gorgeous redhead sitting at the next table. I had been checking her out since I sat down, but lacked the nerve to talk with her.
     Suddenly she sneezed, and her glass eye came flying out of its socket towards me. I reflexively reached out, grabbed it out of the air, and handed it back. 
     "Oh my, I am so sorry, " the woman said as she popped her eye back in place.  "Let me buy your dinner to make it up to you."
     We enjoyed a wonderful dinner together, and afterwards we went to a movie followed by drinks at one of my college hangouts. We talked, we laughed, she shared her deepest dreams and I shared mine.
     After paying for everything, she asked me if I would like to come to her place for a nightcap.  I had a wonderful, unbelievable time.  Everything had been so incredible!
     "You know, " I said, "you are a very special young lady.  Are you this nice to every guy you meet?"
     "No," she replies. "You just happened to catch my eye."
 
I have always believed the secret of our long marriage is that we take time to go to a restaurant two times a week—a little candlelight, dinner, soft music and dancing. Patty goes on Tuesdays, I go on Fridays.
 
Did you ever wonder why Sea World has a seafood restaurant?  I mean, you are halfway through your fish sandwich and you realize, "Oh my goodness."
 
Last night, I ordered a whole meal in French.  Even the waiter was amazed—it was a Japanese restaurant.
 
I have always thought that having a smoking section in a restaurant is like having a peeing section in a swimming pool.
 
I was at this restaurant and the sign said 'Breakfast Anytime'…So I ordered French Toast in the Renaissance.
 
Have a good week,
Al
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Thanks to Carl….This is a nasty disease. Both my parents had it.
(More good news about GC!  This is from today's Daily Dose email newsletter!)
 
Glen Campbell's two key lessons about Alzheimer's

This was a rough week for American music fans, with the death of country and western icon Glen Campbell. 

But what made it even tougher is that we all know this proud American legend didn't slip away peacefully after one more encore. 

He fought -- and lost -- a public battle with Alzheimer's, one of the most devastating diseases of aging, and he let America watch his battle every step of the way. 

He did a "farewell" tour after the diagnosis where he struggled to remember his own songs, and he gave interviews where he spoke frankly about the toll of the disease. 

His family even let a news crew into their home just months ago, showing how the Alzheimer's had robbed him of everything right down to his dignity as he yelled at pictures on the walls. 

Glen Campbell wasn't trying to cash in on his name and reputation while he could. 

He was a man of dignity and pride, and he was already living comfortably with a $50 million fortune from decades of chart-topping tunes and a hit TV show. 

Campbell could've taken the quiet way out, retiring without a word six years ago before anyone knew what was going on. 

He didn't. 

"Here's a guy, an iconic musician, who was faced with having to hang up his guitar, his career is over," James Keach, who made a film about Campbell, told the Los Angeles Times. "But instead, he says, 'I ain't done yet. I'm going out to show what this disease is' because he wants to change the conversation." 

That he did, and he did it in two ways that leave behind a gift even bigger than his powerful music. 

He left behind a PLAN OF ATTACK for anyone facing Alzheimer's -- two steps we all can copy to live LONGER and BETTER, even in the grips of late-stage disease. 

First, he showed the power of persistence. When his mind started to slip, he got help fast. Docs first told him it was cognitive impairment. But as it quickly got worse, he didn't rest on his bottom. 

He went back to the doctors, took more tests, and pushed to make sure they got it right -- making sure they found the disease as early as possible to give him the best chance he could at living longer and better. 

And second, he kept doing what he loved while he still could, and for as long as he could. He recorded. He toured. He kept busy. 

This wasn't just for show. 

His doctors said that high level of activity and keeping engaged helped to slow the progression of the disease. 

When he was diagnosed, he was told he might have as few as two or three years left. 

Instead, his activity and engagement helped keep him around for six and a half years. At one point, he even traveled to Washington to testify before Congress, as he lobbied for Alzheimer's patients even as the disease was clearly already taking hold. 

That, my friend, isn't just a performer. 

That's an honest-to-goodness American hero. 

Rest in peace, Glen Campbell. 

With great respect,
Jack Harrison
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Thanks to  Mike
Eight Words With Two Meanings
And other musings...
 
1. THINGY (thing-ee) n.
Female...... Any part under a car's hood.
Male..... The strap fastener on a woman's bra.
 
2. VULNERABLE (vul-ne-ra-bel) adj.
Female.... Fully opening up one's self emotionally to another.
Male..... Playing football without a cup.
 
3. COMMUNICATION (ko-myoo-ni-kay-shon) n.
Female... The open sharing of thoughts and feelings with one's partner.
Male... Leaving a note before taking off on a fishing trip with the boys.
 
4. COMMITMENT (ko- mit-ment) n.
Female..... A desire to get married and raise a family.
Male...... Trying not to hit on other women while out with this one.
 
5. ENTERTAINMENT (en-ter-tayn-ment) n.
Female.... A good movie, concert, play or book.
Male...... Anything that can be done while drinking beer.
 
6. FLATULENCE (flach-u-lens) n.
Female.... An embarrassing by-product of indigestion.
Male...... A source of entertainment, self-expression, male bonding.
 
7 MAKING LOVE (may-king luv) n.
Female...... The greatest expression of intimacy a couple can achieve.
Male..... Call it whatever you want, just as long as we do it.
 
8. REMOTE CONTROL (ri-moht kon-trohl) n.
Female.... A device for changing from one TV channel to another.
Male... A device for scanning through all 375 channels every 5 minutes.
 
AND;
He said.... I don't know why you wear a bra; you've got nothing to put in it.
She said.... You wear pants don't you?
 
He said..... Shall we try swapping positions tonight?
She said... That's a good idea - you stand by the ironing board while I sit on the sofa and fart!
 
He said..... What have you been doing with all the grocery money I gave you?
She said ....Turn sideways and look in the mirror!
 
He said..... Why are married women heavier than single women?
She said.... Single women come home, see what's in the fridge and go to bed. Married women come home, see what's in bed and go to the fridge.
 
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food for thought and comment.
Thanks to Jim….This is a repeat from a couple years ago but worth reading again
What Have We Become
This is a well-written article about a father who put several of his kids through expensive colleges but one son wanted to be a Marine.
Interesting observation by this dad.  See below.  A very interesting commentary that says a lot about our failing and fallen society.
 
By Frank Schaeffer of the Washington Post
 
"Before my son became a Marine, I never thought much about who was defending me.  Now when I read of the war on terrorism or the coming conflict in Iraq, it cuts to my heart. When I see a picture of a member of our military who has been killed, I read his or her name
very carefully. Sometimes I cry.
 
In 1999, when the barrel-chested Marine recruiter showed up in dress blues and bedazzled my son John, I did not stand in the way.  John was headstrong, and he seemed to understand these stern, clean men with straight backs and flawless uniforms.  I did not.  I live in the Volvo-driving, higher education-worshiping North Shore of Boston I write novels for a living. I have never served in the military.
 
It had been hard enough sending my two older children off to Georgetown and New York University. John's enlisting was unexpected, so
deeply unsettling.  I did not relish the prospect of answering the question, "So where is John going to college?" from the parents who were
itching to tell me all about how their son or daughter was going to Harvard.  At the private high school John attended, no other students
were going into the military.
 
"But aren't the Marines terribly Southern?" (Says a lot about open-mindedness in the Northeast) asked one perplexed mother while standing
next to me at the brunch following graduation.  "What a waste, he was such a good student," said another parent.  One parent (a professor at a nearby and a rather famous university) spoke up at a school meeting and suggested that the school should "carefully evaluate what went wrong."
 
When John graduated from three months of boot camp on Parris Island, 3000 parents and friends were on the parade deck stands.  We parents
and our Marines not only were of many races but also were representative of many economic classes. Many were poor. Some arrived crammed
in the backs of pickups, others by bus.  John told me that a lot of parents could not afford the trip.
 
We in the audience were white and Native American.  We were Hispanic, Arab, and African American, and Asian. We were former Marines wearing
the scars of battle or at least baseball caps emblazoned with battles' names.  We were Southern whites from Nashville and skinheads from
New Jersey, black kids from Cleveland wearing ghetto rags and white ex-cons with ham-hock forearms defaced by jailhouse tattoos.  We would
not have been mistaken for the educated and well-heeled parents gathered on the lawns of John's private school a half-year before.
 
After graduation one new Marine told John, "Before I was a Marine, if I had ever seen you on my block I would've probably killed you just because
you were standing there." This was a serious statement from one of John's good friends, a black ex-gang member from Detroit who, as John said,
"would die for me now, just like I'd die for him."
 
My son has connected me to my country in a way that I was too selfish and insular to experience before.  I feel closer to the waitress at our local
diner than to some of my oldest friends.  She has two sons in the Corps.  They are facing the same dangers as my boy.  When the guy who fixes
my car asks me how John is doing, I know he means it.  His younger brother is in the Navy. Why were I and the other parents at my son's private school so surprised by his choice?  During World War II, the sons and daughters of the most
powerful and educated families did their bit.  If the idea of the immorality of the Vietnam War was the only reason those lucky enough to go to
college dodged the draft, why did we not encourage our children to volunteer for military service once that war was done?
 
Have we wealthy and educated Americans all become pacifists?  Is the world a safe place?  Or have we just gotten used to having somebody
else defend us?  What is the future of our democracy when the sons and daughters of the janitors at our elite universities are far more likely to
be put in harm's way than are any of the students whose dorms their parents clean?
 
I feel shame because it took my son's joining the Marine Corps to make me take notice of who is defending me.
 
I feel hope because perhaps my son is part of a future "greatest generation."  As the storm clouds of war gather, at least I know that I can look
the men and women in uniform in the eye.  My son is one of them.  He is the best I have to offer.  John is my heart.
 
Faith is not about everything turning out OK;
 
Faith is about being OK no matter how things turn out.
 
Oh, how I wish so many of our younger generations could read this article.  It makes me so sad to hear the way they talk with no respect for
what their fathers, grandfathers, and great-grandfathers experienced so they can live in freedom.  Freedom has been replaced with Free-Dumb.
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Item Number:1 Date: 08/14/2017 AFGHANISTAN - BODYGUARDS BLAMED FOR ASSASSINATION OF TALIBAN COMMANDER IN NANGARHAR (AUG 14/KP)  KHAAMA PRESS -- A local Taliban leader in Nangarhar province was killed last week by his own bodyguards, reports the Khaama Press (Afghanistan), citing provincial officials.   Fazal Subhan, also known as Kaka, was assassinated alongside four others near Khogyani district. The shooting took place on Thursday night, said a provincial police statement on Monday.   Subhan had been a key Taliban leader in the district. His brother is Malwavi Nik Mohammad, another senior Taliban commander, said provincial police.   No details were given on about what may have led to the attack.   Afghan forces, backed by the U.S., have been conducting operations against both the Taliban and ISIS in Nangarhar province
  Item Number:2 Date: 08/14/2017 AFGHANISTAN - U.S. CONFIRMS DEATHS OF ISIS-K LEADER, SENIOR COMMANDERS IN KUNAR (AUG 14/KP)  KHAAMA PRESS -- The U.S. military has confirmed that an American airstrike last week killed several senior local Islamic State leaders in Afghanistan, reports the Khaama Press (Afghanistan).   Abdul Rahman and three other senior members of ISIS-Khorasan (ISIS-K) were killed on Aug. 10 in Dara-Ye Pech district in Kunar province, said U.S. Forces in Afghanistan on Sunday.   Rhaman was considered the terror group's provincial "emir," and a prime candidate to become the overall emir in Afghanistan after former leader Abu Sayed was killed in July 2017, said the statement.  
Item Number:3 Date: 08/14/2017 BURKINA FASO - POLICE KILL TERRORISTS WHO ATTACKED RESTAURANT IN CAPITAL; ABOUT 20 DEATHS REPORTED (AUG 14/BBC)  BRITISH BROADCASTING CORP. -- A terrorist incident that started with an attack on a restaurant in Burkina Faso has left about 20 people dead and 20 wounded, reports the BBC.   On Sunday night, gunmen opened fire at people on the terrace of the Turkish Aziz Istanbul restaurant in Ouagadougou, the capital, said police. The venue is said to be popular with foreigners.   The attackers then barricaded themselves into the restaurant, noted CNN.   Security forces assaulted the restaurant about an hour later.   The operation ended about 5 a.m. Monday, local time.   There was no immediate claim of responsibility.   In January 2016, gunmen conducted a similar attack on a hotel and restaurant in the capital, killing 30 people. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) claimed responsibility for that attack
Item Number:4 Date: 08/14/2017 CANADA - WARSHIP PROJECT ROILED OVER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ISSUES (AUG 14/CBC)  CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION -- The concerns of a Canadian ally over sharing data have affected a major navy program.   One of the 12 companies competing for Canada's new frigate program has been prevented from delivering "supporting data and services," according to documents obtained by CBC News.   The unidentified bidder says that one of Canada's allies, which owns the rights to the sensitive electronics embedded in the warship design, is refusing permission to include the data. Instead, the ally wants to hold direct talks with the Canadian government.   The nation, which is not identified in the Aug. 2 document, does not want to deal with Irving Shipbuilding, the lead contractor for the frigate program, the documents show.   The ally sees some of the terms in Ottawa's request for proposals for the frigate program to be unacceptable.   The ongoing issues with intellectual property raise questions with the structure of the Canadian Surface Combatant program.   Many of the systems developed by the countries considering competing for the Canadian program, especially electronics, are proprietary. There is reluctance to share information about those systems for national security reasons.   However, the shipbuilders considering bidding for the program must be able to provide such information, analysts said. Responsibility for acquiring the information is on the bidders, according to Canadian officials.   Officials from Public Works and Government Services Canada insist that their request is not unusual and maintain that a number of bids will ultimately be received
  Item Number:5 Date: 08/14/2017 ESTONIA - AMERICAN, BRITISH, ESTONIAN PERSONNEL WORK TOGETHER IN AIR-LAND EXERCISE (AUG 14/ANS)  ARMY NEWS SERVICE -- Military personnel from the U.S. and U.K. have been working with Estonian authorities in a combined aerial-ground exercise near Jagala, reports the Army News Service.   Army personnel from the 3rd General Support Aviation Battalion, 10th Aviation Regiment, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division and the 175th Wing, Maryland Air National Guard worked with the British army's 5th Battalion, the Rifles, 20th Armored Brigade during the exercise last week.   U.S. CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift helicopters were escorted by U.S. UH-60L Black Hawk helicopters to drop off British troops on their mission to secure a civilian highway, noted the service release on Aug. 10.   The drill allowed American, British and Estonian troops and local law enforcement to work together under a unified command to successfully land an A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft in a civilian area, said officers.   Once the British troops secured a perimeter, the A-10s landed, were assessed by a maintenance crew and took off again, noted the release
Item Number:6 Date: 08/14/2017 IRAQ - 2 AMERICAN TROOPS DIE, SEVERAL WOUNDED; INCIDENT CAUSED BY SHELL EXPLOSION, SAYS BAGHDAD (AUG 14/WP)  WASHINGTON POST -- The U.S. military has announced that two American soldiers were killed Sunday and five others injured during "combat operations" in northern Iraq, reports the Washington Post.   The same day, ISIS claimed attacking U.S. forces assisting Iraqi troops east of the northern Iraqi city of Tal Afar, reported Reuters.   A spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S. operation against the Islamic State, called the ISIS claim "false," and said the casualties were "not because of enemy fire."   On Monday, the Iraqi government said the casualties came while the soldiers were inspecting a cannon and the shell inside exploded
Item Number:7 Date: 08/14/2017 ISRAEL - SENIOR GENERAL REVEALS INTEL SHOWING HAMAS USING CIVILIANS FOR COVER IN TUNNEL EFFORTS (AUG 14/DN)  DEFENSE NEWS -- Israel has revealed detailed intelligence that purports to show how the Hamas militant group is using newly constructed residential buildings in the Gaza Strip to hide its expansion of underground tunnels and command centers, reports Defense News.   The group reportedly plans to use the new infrastructure in a new war against Israel, according to Israeli officials.   During an unusual briefing on Thursday, Maj Gen. Eyal Zamir, the head of the military's Southern Command, sought to strengthen Israel's case should it need to destroy such structures in residential areas.   The general maintained that there was much more information available beyond the two homes showed in great detail during the briefing.   Zamir referred to the two structures -- a six-story building and private parking lot with access to a tunnel network and a family home with a tunnel entrance that connects to a nearby mosque -- as "legitimate military targets."   Should Israel have to strike such targets, civilians would likely be harmed, he acknowledged. This is just what Hamas and other Gaza-based groups hope happens to "try to damage Israel's legitimacy," said the general
  Item Number:8 Date: 08/14/2017 PAKISTAN - SUICIDE BOMBING KILLS AT LEAST 15 NEAR INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION IN QUETTA (AUG 14/DAWN)  DAWN -- A suicide bomber killed at least 15 people and wounded 40 others on Saturday night in Baluchistan province, say Pakistani officials, as reported by Dawn (Pakistan).   A man on a motorcycle rammed into an army truck and detonated his explosives close to a bus stop in Quetta, the provincial capital, said local officials cited by the New York Times.   About 25-30 kg (55-66 lbs) of explosives were used, one official said. The incendiary device involved caused numerous vehicles to catch on fire, he said.   The attack took place near a stadium where celebrations were being held to mark the 70th anniversary of Pakistan's independence, reported Al Jazeera. The attack was apparently intended to sabotage that event, said the military.   The dead included eight soldiers and seven civilians, said Pakistan's military.   The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack.  
 Item Number:9 Date: 08/14/2017 RUSSIA - FSB THWARTS ATTACKS ON MOSCOW'S PUBLIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM (AUG 14/RT)  RUSSIA TODAY -- The Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) says it has arrested a number of terrorist suspects planning attacks in Moscow, reports Russia's RT news channel.   An operation on Monday in the Moscow region netted two suicide bombers, an explosives specialist and an ISIS "emissary," said a statement from the security agency.   According to the FSB, the group planned to attack public places in the Russian capital, including transport and shopping centers. The attacks were organized by ISIS leaders in Syria, the statement said.   The FSB also said it found and neutralized an explosives-making factory.   Those arrested included one Russian citizen and three individuals from Central Asian nations, said the agency
Item Number:10 Date: 08/14/2017 RUSSIA - FEMALE FIGHTER JET PILOTS TO BEGIN TRAINING WITHIN MONTHS (AUG 14/RT)  RUSSIA TODAY -- Russia's air force will soon train female fighter pilots, says Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, as reported by Russia's RT news channel.   Fifteen female cadets will begin their training on Oct 1., said Shoigu. He made his comments Saturday at a celebration of the air force outside Moscow.   The cadets will attend the Krasnodar Higher Military Aviation School. The school has been accepting women since 2009, but not for pilot training, noted Tass.   During World War II, the Soviet Union had female pilots called "Stalin's Falcons." The Kremlin has not had female fighter pilots since then, noted the BBC.  
  Item Number:11 Date: 08/14/2017 RUSSIA - SERBIAN CONTINGENT JOINS COMBINED ARMS DRILL NEAR ST. PETERSBURG (AUG 14/INT-AVN)  INTERFAX-MILITARY NEWS AGENCY -- More than 500 Russian and Serbian military personnel recently completed a joint combined arms exercise at the Kirillovsky range in the western Leningrad region, reports Interfax-AVN.   At least 60 Serbian troops participated in the drill, which focused on destroying simulated illegal armed groups, said a spokesman for Russia's Western Military District last week.   The soldiers in the drill were equipped with the latest small arms, automated reconnaissance and communication systems and more than 30 armored vehicles, including BTR-82A and MTLB armored vehicles and T-72B3 tanks.   Su-34 strike and Su-27 fighter aircraft took part, along with Ka-52 and Mi-28N attack and Mi-8 transport helicopters.   Motorized infantry units were supported by 120-mm 2B11 mortars and 152-mm MSTA-S self-propelled howitzers
Item Number:12 Date: 08/14/2017 RWANDA - VISITING SRI LANKAN OFFICERS SEE LESSONS TO BE LEARNED FROM CALAMITIES (AUG 14/NEWT)  NEW TIMES -- A delegation from the Sri Lanka Defense Service Command and Staff College is in Rwanda for a two-week study tour, reports the New Times (Kigali).   Last week, the 16 Sri Lankans visited the Kigali Genocide Memorial and received a briefing on the roles and functions of the Rwandan military at the Defense Ministry in the capital, officials said.   There are lessons from Rwanda that can benefit Sri Lanka , said Col. Kithsiri Ekanayake, the head of the delegation.   Both nations have had extended civil wars.   "We heard that Rwanda is progressing well in the process of reconciliation and rebuilding and thought of getting some experience from her," the colonel said. "It's a great thing for us as we are also engaging in rebuilding our nation and we hope these lessons will be good ingredients to adopt in our country," he said.   The delegation is expected to visit the Rwandan Command and Staff College to learn about peace support operations and other institutions for briefing on capacity building, skilled development airspace management and other topics.   The visit runs until Aug. 22.  
  Item Number:13 Date: 08/14/2017 SOMALIA - CO-FOUNDER OF AL-SHABAAB, GROUP'S ONETIME DEPUTY LEADER, SURRENDERS (AUG 14/CNN)  CABLE NEWS NETWORK -- The co-founder of the Al-Shabaab terrorist group has surrendered to the Somali government, says a state official cited by CNN.   Mukhtar Robow Abu Mansur gave himself up Saturday in the town of Hudur, about 250 miles southwest of Mogadishu, said a local security official.   The group's co-founder and onetime deputy head, Robow also previously served as an Al-Shabaab spokesman and spiritual leader. He left the group in 2013 after a disagreement with group leader Ahmed Abdi Godane, who was killed in a September 2014 airstrike.   Robow and his followers had been fighting Al-Shabaab fighters in his hometown of Abal after he began negotiations with the Somali government in June, reported Reuters.   The U.S. removed its US$5 million bounty on Robow in June and removed him from its list of sponsors of terrorism. It was unclear if the timing was linked
  Item Number:14 Date: 08/14/2017 SOUTH KOREA - NEW ARMY CHIEF PLEDGES TO IMPROVE COMBAT CAPABILITIES, SOLDIERS' CONDITIONS (AUG 14/YON)  YONHAP -- When South Korea's Gen Kim Yong Woo was sworn in as the new army chief last week, he vowed to strengthen his service's combat capabilities, reports the Yonhap news agency (Seoul).   "The army needs to be optimized as an organization focused on combat and reserve forces should also be strengthened," Kim said in his inauguration speech Friday at the army headquarters in Gyeryongdae.   The general pledged to assign more of the service's non-combat duties to the private sector and improve the preparation of reserve forces for combat.   Kim said he would work to improve soldiers' human rights and conditions, following a recent scandal. An army general's wife was found to be abusing conscripts serving at their personal residence.  
 Item Number:15 Date: 08/14/2017 SYRIA - ISIS LOSES AL-SUKHNA, LAST TOWN IN HOMS PROVINCE (AUG 14/REU)  REUTERS -- Syrian government and allied forces say they have regained control of the last major Islamic State-held town in Homs province, reports Reuters, citing state media.   An unspecified number of ISIS militants were killed and their weapons destroyed at the town of Al-Sukhna, about 30 miles northeast of the ancient city of Palmyra, said a Syrian military source cited by the state-run SANA on Saturday.   The town is also about 30 miles from the boundary of Deir Ezzor province, the terror group's remaining stronghold in Syria. ISIS controls nearly all of that province, which borders Iraq to the east.   Earlier reports said pro-government forces entered Al-Sukhna on Aug. 5., with some accounts indicated the town had been taken
  Item Number:16 Date: 08/14/2017 TAIWAN - FOR 3 DAYS RUNNING, CHINESE MILITARY AIRCRAFT FLY NEAR TAIWANESE AIRSPACE (AUG 14/CENTRALNA)  CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY -- Chinese military aircraft have flown close to Taiwan for the third day in a row, the Defense Ministry in Taipei said on Monday, as reported by state-run Central News Agency (Taiwan).   On Saturday, Chinese bombers and transport aircraft flew through the Bashi Channel between Taiwan and the Philippines before going near the island of Miyako. Chinese fighters and airborne early warning aircraft only flew through the Bashi Channel, said the Defense Ministry.   The ministry said Chinese military transport aircraft also flew the same route on Sunday. They were joined by two Chinese fighter jets near Miyako, reported Reuters.   On Monday, two Chinese Y-8 transport aircraft again made the same flight after a far-sea flight training mission, according a ministry statement. One aircraft went toward Miyako and the other turned southeast after passing through the Bashi Channel.   Taiwanese forces monitored the flights and they posed no threat, the statement said
Item Number:17 Date: 08/14/2017 THAILAND - BANGKOK CLEARED TO BUY HARPOON ANTI-SHIP MISSILES FOR NAVY (AUG 14/DSCA)  U.S. DEFENSE SECURITY COOPERATION AGENCY -- The U.S. State Dept. has approved a possible Foreign Military Sale of anti-ship missiles to Thailand, reports the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency.   The proposed US$24.9 million sale covers up to five RGM-84L Harpoon Block II surface-launched missiles and one RTM-84L exercise missile, as well as containers, spare and repair parts, support and test equipment and other logistics and technical support.   The missiles are intended for integration with Thailand's Tha Chine-class (DW3000) frigate. The Harpoons will improve the Thai navy's ability to defend critical sea lanes, said the agency on Thursday.   Congress was notified of the potential deal on Aug. 9
  Item Number:18 Date: 08/14/2017 USA - LOCKHEED TOUTS NEXT-GENERATION MISSILE DEFENSE RADAR WITH 360-DEGREE CAPABILITY (AUG 14/DN)  DEFENSE NEWS -- Lockheed Martin recently displayed its latest air and missile defense radar at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Ala., reports Defense News.   The company plans to offer the 360-degree radar for the Army's future integrated air and missile defense system, officials said at the show, which ran through Aug. 10.   The Army has decided to hold a competition to replace its Patriot Air and Missile Defense radar, with plans to begin analyzing offerings in fiscal 2018.   The future system will use the Integrated Battle Command System (IBCS) being developed by Northrop Grumman and the PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) interceptor.   A key capability for the new radar is a 360-degree threat detection capability, since the current system has blind spots.   The dual-band system combines both surveillance and fire-control functions and incorporates gallium-nitride technology.   The radar also features what Lockheed calls "Every Element Digital Beam Forming." This technology allows the operator to assign different missions to different parts of the array
Item Number:19 Date: 08/14/2017 USA - NEW 'FASTER-DRYING' ARMY JUNGLE UNIFORM TO BE TESTED IN HAWAII IN 2018 (AUG 14/MIL)  MILITARY.COM -- U.S. Army officials say the service will begin evaluating its new jungle uniform in Hawaii starting in January 2018, reports Military.com.   The Improved Hot Weather Combat Uniform (IHWCU) was created under a requirement to develop a jungle uniform optimized for operations in the Pacific region.   The Army has already fielded new jungle combat boots to the 2nd and 3rd Brigade Combat Teams of the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.   Troops have been training for operations in hot, tropical environments with Universal Camouflage Pattern Army Combat Uniforms and hot weather combat boots designed for desert environments.   The IHWCU is 57 percent nylon, 43 percent cotton blend so that it dries faster and has improved airflow compared to the current 50/50 nylon/cotton blend, said program officials.   It also has better flexibility and fewer layers of fabric, so it retains less moisture and dries quicker.   There are no breast pockets, since soldiers in the field are typically wearing equipment that covers them. The uniform blouse also features a button-down front instead of a zipper closure.   Plans call for distributing around 20,000 uniform sets to the 2nd and 3rd BCTs in January and another 10,000 to 12,000 sets in March, the officials said.   The soldiers will provide feedback in April and May for any needed adjustments, said program officials
  Item Number:20 Date: 08/14/2017 USA - PROBE FINDS LACK OF FLYING TIME PLAYED ROLE IN LAST YEAR'S MARINE F/A-18 COLLISION (AUG 14/MCT)  MARINE CORPS TIMES -- An investigation into a collision of two Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet fighters in November 2016 determined that the pilots' lack of flying time was a contributing factor, reports the Marine Corps Times.   The findings of the investigation were obtained by the newspaper through a Freedom of Information Act request.   During the Nov. 9, 2016, incident, one pilot ejected safely and the other was able to land his damaged aircraft after the two jets collided while practicing basic fighter maneuvers over the Pacific Ocean near San Diego.   Both pilots lacked the experience and proficiency needed to react correctly once it became clear they were on course to crash, said Col. William Swan, the commanding officer of Marine Aircraft Group 11 at the time.   "This mishap brings into sharp focus the difference between currency and proficiency," Swan wrote in a letter endorsing the investigation's findings. "Given sustained low flight hours across the F/A-18 community, our aircrew have a smaller scope of experience and significantly reduced tactical proficiency. The community will continue to operate under greater risk until both the frequency and the quality of training sorties can increase."   At the time of the accident, one of the pilots had only spent 3.1 hours in the cockpit ion the previous 30 days, according to the investigation. The pilot had not flown the number of sorties required by the Training and Readiness Manual to practice the maneuvers in question.   The commanding officer waived the requirement by assigning and instructor pilot with 15.2 hours over the previous month as his flight lead.   The Marine Corps has fallen short of its goal for flight hours since 2012 because of issues such as budget cuts, aging aircraft and a lack of spare parts, noted the paper.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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