Friday, March 10, 2017

Fw: TheList 4406



The List 4406

To All,

I hope that you all have a great weekend. The time change is on Sunday which will put a damper on your life for the next couple weeks.

Daylight savings time explanation…...one of many

video
 



Regards,
skip
 
This Day In Naval History - March 10
1783: The last naval action of the American Revolution takes place when the Continental frigate Alliance, commanded by Capt. John Barry, battles HMS Sybil south of Cape Canaveral, Fla. Sybil is damaged in the fight and returns to the two warships that did not join in the battle.
 
1933 - Pacific Fleet provides assistance after earthquake at Long Beach, CA
1945 - Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown
back to U.S. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Star.
1948 - First use of jets assigned to operational squadron (VF-5A) on board
a carrier (Boxer)
 
 
This Day In Naval History - March 11
1935 - Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group
1941 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act
1942: Lt. John Bulkeley, commander of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3, helps Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Rear Adm. Francis W. Rockwell, as well as their families and others, escape the Philippines in motor torpedo boats PT 32, PT 34, PT 35, and PT 41. For this action, along with other operations in the Philippines during the start of World War II, he receives the Medal of Honor.
1945 - Use of first Navy landing craft to cross Rhine River at Bad Neuenahr
1965 - Market Time patrols begin off South Vietnam coast
 
This Day In Naval History - March 12
1917 - All American merchant ships to be armed in war zones
1942 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet to which he was appointed on 30 December 1941.
1956 - In first overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83 left on USS Intrepid
This Day In Naval History - March 11
1935 - Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group
1941 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act
1942: Lt. John Bulkeley, commander of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3, helps Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Rear Adm. Francis W. Rockwell, as well as their families and others, escape the Philippines in motor torpedo boats PT 32, PT 34, PT 35, and PT 41. For this action, along with other operations in the Philippines during the start of World War II, he receives the Medal of Honor.
1945 - Use of first Navy landing craft to cross Rhine River at Bad Neuenahr
1965 - Market Time patrols begin off South Vietnam coast
 
This Day In Naval History - March 12
1917 - All American merchant ships to be armed in war zones
1942 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet to which he was appointed on 30 December 1941.
1956 - In first overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83 left on USS Intrepid
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This Day In Naval History - March 11
1935 - Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group
1941 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act
1942: Lt. John Bulkeley, commander of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3, helps Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Rear Adm. Francis W. Rockwell, as well as their families and others, escape the Philippines in motor torpedo boats PT 32, PT 34, PT 35, and PT 41. For this action, along with other operations in the Philippines during the start of World War II, he receives the Medal of Honor.
1945 - Use of first Navy landing craft to cross Rhine River at Bad Neuenahr
1965 - Market Time patrols begin off South Vietnam coast
 
This Day In Naval History - March 12
1917 - All American merchant ships to be armed in war zones
1942 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet to which he was appointed on 30 December 1941.
1956 - In first overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83 left on USS Intrepid
 
This Day In Naval History - March 13
1895 - Award of first submarine building contract to John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co.
1917 - Armed merchant ships authorized to take action against U-boats.
1959 - Naval Research Laboratory takes first ultraviolet pictures of sun.
1963 - USS Albany (CG-10) and aircraft from Navy Airborne Early Warning Squadron Four from Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico aid five ill crewmembers of Norwegian freighter Jotunfjell.
 
 
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·         Today in History March 10
515 BC
The building of the great Jewish temple in Jerusalem is completed.
241 BC
The Roman fleet sinks 50 Carthaginian ships in the Battle of Aegusa.
49 BC
Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon and invades Italy.
1656
In the colony of Virginia, suffrage is extended to all free men regardless of their religion.
1776
"Common Sense" by Thomas Paine is published.
1785
Thomas Jefferson is appointed minister to France.
1806
The Dutch in Cape Town, South Africa surrender to the British.
1814
Napoleon Bonaparte is defeated by an allied army at the Battle of Laon, France.
1848
The treaty of Guadeloupe-Hidalgo is signed which ends the United States' war with Mexico.
1876
Alexander Graham Bell makes the first telephone call to Thomas Watson saying "Watson, come here. I need you."
1893
New Mexico State University cancels its first graduation ceremony, because the only graduate was robbed and killed the night before.
1902
The Boers of South Africa score their last victory over the British, capturing British General Methuen and 200 men.
1910
Slavery is abolished in China.
1924
The U.S. Supreme Court upholds a New York state law forbidding late-night work for women.
1927
Prussia lifts its Nazi ban, Adolf Hitler is allowed to speak in public.
1933
Nevada becomes the first U.S. state to regulate drugs.
1941
Vichy France threatens to use its navy unless Britain allows food to reach France.
1943
Adolf Hitler calls Field Marshall Erwin Rommel back from Tunisia in North Africa.
1944
The Irish refuse to oust all Axis envoys and deny the accusation of spying on Allied troops.
1945
American B-29 bombers attack Tokyo, killing 100,000.
1947
The Big Four meet in Moscow to discuss the future of Germany.
1948
Author Zelda Fitzgerald (wife of F. Scott) dies in a fire at Highland Hospital.
1953
North Korean gunners at Wonsan fire on the USS Missouri, the ship responds by firing 998 rounds at the enemy position.
1954
President Dwight Eisenhower calls Senator Joseph McCarthy a peril to the Republican Party.
1966
The North Vietnamese capture a Green Beret camp at Ashau Valley.
1969
James Earl Ray pleads guilty to the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King and is sentenced to 99 years in jail.
1971
The Senate approves a Constitutional amendment to lower the voting age to 18.
1975
The North Vietnamese Army attacks the South Vietnamese town of Buon Ma Thout, the offensive will end with total victory in Vietnam.
1980
Iran's leader, Ayatollah Khomeini, lends his support to the militants holding the American hostages in Tehran.
1982
The United States bans Libyan oil imports, because of the continued support of terrorism.
1987
The Vatican condemns surrogate parenting as well as test-tube and artificial insemination.
 
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Thanks to Carl
 
Throwback Thursday: Pardo's Push
MARCH 10, 2016
FighterSweep Fans, it's safe to say we all have our heroes in the aviation world who inspired us to pursue our passion. I personally have been very fortunate to meet a number of the men I read about growing up: Bud Anderson, Chuck Yeager, Bob Hoover, Joe Engel, and Pappy Boyington immediately come to mind.

Last summer, during Exercise Sentry Eagle 2015, I had the opportunity to meet another one of the men whose exploits are the stuff of legend. One of the guests of the 173rd Fighter Wing for the event was none other than Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Robert Pardo. Today is his 82nd birthday, and we thought it was especially fitting to honor this man by telling his story on Throwback Thursday.
So with the help of Wikipedia, here is one of the most amazing tales of courage, ingenuity, and heroism in the entire history of aviation:
Steve Fergusion's painting of "Pardo's Push." (Courtesy of www.8tfw.com)
Captain Bob Pardo (with rear pilot 1st Lt Steve Wayne) and wingman Captain Earl Aman (with rear pilot 1st Lt Robert Houghton) were assigned to the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, 433rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, at Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand. In March 1967, they were trying to attack a steel mill in North Vietnam just north of Hanoi.
On March 10, 1967, the sky was clear for a bombing run, but both F-4 Phantom IIs were hit by anti-aircraft fire. Aman's plane took the worst damage; his fuel tank had been hit, and he quickly lost most of his fuel. He did not have enough fuel to make it to a tanker aircraft over Laos.
To avoid having Aman and Houghton bail out over hostile territory, Pardo decided to try pushing the airplane. Pardo first tried pushing the plane using Aman's drag chute compartment but turbulence interfered.
Pardo then tried to use Aman's tailhook to push the plane, the Phantom having been originally designed as a naval aircraft equipped with a heavy duty tailhook for landings aboard aircraft carriers. Aman lowered his tailhook and Pardo moved behind Aman until the tailhook was against Pardo's windscreen. Aman shut down both of his J79 jet engines. The push worked, reducing the rate of descent considerably, but the tailhook slipped off the windscreen every 15 to 30 seconds, and Pardo would have to reposition his plane. Pardo also struggled with a fire in one of his own engines and eventually had to shut it down. In the remaining 10 minutes of flight time, Pardo used the one last engine to slow the descent of both planes.
With Pardo's plane running out of fuel after pushing Aman's plane almost 88 miles, the planes reached Laotian airspace at an altitude of 6,000 feet (1,800 m). This left them about two minutes of flying time. The pilots ejected, evaded capture, and were picked up by rescue helicopters.
He was initially reprimanded for not saving his own aircraft. However, in 1989, the military re-examined the case and awarded both Pardo and Wayne the Silver Star for the maneuver, two decades after the incident.
What better way to close out the day of flying the F-15 Eagle than to hang out with one of your heroes!! FighterSweep Host and Editor Scott Wolff with Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Robert Pardo.
A very Happy Birthday to you, sir! I am glad our paths crossed, and I hope to see you again soon!
(Featured photo courtesy of TacAirNet.com)
 
 
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Item Number:1 Date: 03/10/2017 AUSTRALIA - STUART FRIGATE READY FOR SEA TRIALS FOLLOWING REFIT AT BAE SHIPYARD IN HENDERSON (MAR 10/BAE)  BAE SYSTEMS -- BAE Systems Australia has announced the completion of the modernization of all eight of the Australian navy's ANZAC-class frigates under the Anti-Ship Missile Defense (ASMD) program.   The eighth, HMAS Stuart, recently completed the upgrade at the company's shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia. The Stuart will now undertake sea trials before returning to operational service, said BAE in a release on Thursday.   The modernization covered the combat management system, installation of an infrared search-and-track system, phased-array radar and dual-navigation radar system.   A number of engineering and structural updates were completed, including enclosing the quarterdeck and modifications to accommodate naval helicopters.   Separately, BAE is preparing HMAS Perth for some initial work as part of a mid-life capability upgrade. That frigate will return at a later date for the remainder of the modernization to be completed, said BAE.   HMAS Arunta is scheduled to arrive at Henderson in September for the mid-life update, which is expected to take 12 months.   This upgrade covers engines, propulsion, lighting, heating, cooling, communications, torpedo self-defense and Nulka decoy systems, according to BAE
  Item Number:2 Date: 03/10/2017 CANADA - AFTER 44 YEARS, ATHABASKAN DESTROYER FACES DECOMMISSIONING (MAR 10/CP)  CANADIAN PRESS -- Canada's last destroyer has just made its final sail.   The Royal Canadian Navy is decommissioning the fourth and last of its aging Iroquois-class destroyers, reports the Canadian Press.   HMCS Athabaskan will retire from service during a Friday ceremony in Halifax, Nova Scotia.   On Wednesday, the destroyer conducted her last "day sail" around Halifax harbor, according to Global News (British Columbia).   The Athabaskan was commissioned in September 1972 and was deployed to the first Gulf War in 1990, delivered aid to the U.S. Gulf states after Hurricane Katrina in 2010 and Haiti after an earthquake in 2010, as well as numerous NATO missions.   The Iroquois class is expected to be replaced by the planned Canadian Surface Combat
Item Number:3 Date: 03/10/2017 CANADA - CONVENTIONAL FORCES TO SUCCEED SPECIAL OPERATORS IN NIGER'S TRAINING MISSION (MAR 10/CBC)  CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION -- A contingent of Canadian military personnel from a unit in Quebec will take over a mission to train security forces in Niger, reports CBC News.   As many as 25 soldiers from the French-speaking 1st Battalion, Royal 22nd Regiment, in Valcartier, Quebec, will assume responsibility for Operation Naberius from Canadian special operations forces.   The CBC only said the revamped mission would begin soon. No official notice was made by the Defense Dept.   The special operators have been training Nigerien military personnel in marksmanship, reconnaissance and other basic military skills since 2013.   Under the revamped mission, there will be two deployments per year, each lasting two to three months, to provide instruction to local forces, defense officials told the publication.   The goal is strengthen "regional efforts to counter the influence of violent extremist organizations in the Sahel region of Africa," a department spokesman said in response to a query.   The Niger mission is not related to Ottawa's more publicized plans to bolster U.N. peacekeeping in Africa.  
  Item Number:4 Date: 03/10/2017 CHINA - J-20 STEALTH JET NOW IN SERVICE, SAYS STATE TELEVISION (MAR 10/SCMP)  SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST -- State-run television has confirmed that China has inducted its new generation of stealth fighter, reports the South China Morning Post.   Late on Thursday, the military channel reported that the J-20 stealth fighter had entered service. No other details were given.   Footage showed the J-20 flying alongside Y-20 transport planes and H-6K bombers, both of which are already in service.   The stealth fighter was shown in public at the opening of the Zhuhai airshow in November 2016, and was first spotted in 2010, noted Reuters.   A military observer cited by the South China Morning Post said it was likely there were only a small number of J-20 jets because of its engine problems
Item Number:5 Date: 03/10/2017 EGYPT - MILITANT ROADSIDE BOMBS KILL, WOUND POLICE OFFICERS IN NORTHERN SINAI (MAR 10/AHRAM)  AHRAM ONLINE -- Egyptian officials say a roadside bomb blast has killed two police officers and wounded in the restive Sinai Peninsula, reports Ahram Online (Egypt).   The incident took place Thursday evening near the city of el-Arish, the capital of North Sinai, said the Interior Ministry.   A security patrol found terrorists planting an improvised explosive device, said a statement from the ministry. One of the militants was killed in a shootout. When his accomplices fled, another IED exploded, killing the two officers, said the ministry.   The dead officers were identified as a lieutenant colonel and a captain.   The day previously, a police colonel was killed in a remote-controlled bomb attack on a security checkpoint in el-Arish.  
  Item Number:6 Date: 03/10/2017 IRAN - REVOLUTIONARY GUARDS CORROBORATE REPORTS ABOUT TESTING ANTI-SHIP BALLISTIC MISSILE (MAR 10/TASNIM)  TASNIM NEWS AGENCY -- Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) says it has successfully tested a domestically made ballistic missile, reports the Tasnim news agency (Iran).   The Guards test-fired a Hormuz-2 missile earlier this week, destroying a floating target from a distance of 250 km (155 miles), according to Brig. Gen. Ali Hajizadeh, the head of the IRCG air force on Thursday.   The naval ballistic missile is capable of hitting targets within a range of 300 km (186 miles), according to the Fars news agency (Iran).   Fox News first reported on March 6 that the IRCG had fired two short-range missiles in southeastern Iran. The one fired on March 4 missed, while another on March 5 hit its target, said U.S. officials.  
  Item Number:7 Date: 03/10/2017 ISRAEL - FATAH'S ARMED WING CLAIMS ROCKET ATTACK, VOWS ESCALATION (MAR 10/JP)  JERUSALEM POST -- An armed Palestinian group has claimed responsibility for Thursday night's rocket attack against Israel, reports the Jerusalem Post.   Fatah's armed wing, the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, said in an official statement on Friday that one of its factions was behind two rockets launched from the Gaza Strip toward the southern Eshkol Regional Council.   One rocket landed within the Gaza Strip, reported Palestinian media. Israeli military units responded with artillery fire against the southern city of Khan Unis and the central city of Deir al-Balah, according to those accounts. No casualties were reported.   "The coming days will bring an escalation against the Israeli occupation," said the statement.   Fatah last openly backed an attack against Israel during the 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict.  
Item Number:8 Date: 03/10/2017 JAPAN - ENGINEERS TO PULL OUT OF SOUTH SUDAN'S PEACEKEEPING MISSION (MAR 10/JT)  JAPAN TIMES -- Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has announced that Japan is ending its peacekeeping mission in South Sudan, reports the Japan Times.   About 350 Japanese engineering troops will return home by the end of May, said Abe on Friday.   The engineering unit, based in South Sudan's capital Juba, has been building infrastructure for the past five years. They repaired a total of 210 km (130 mi) of road and prepared 500,000 square meters (123 acres) of land for construction projects, said the Japanese government.   The Japanese troops deployed to the U.N. mission's headquarters in Juba are expected to remain.   Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga denied that the decision to withdraw was made for security reasons in the troubled South Sudan.   Under Japan's peacekeeping operations law, Japan can deploy troops to a U.N. peacekeeping mission only if a cease-fire agreement is in place among conflicting parties, a condition that arguably is not being met in South Sudan.   A peace deal signed in August 2015 has not stopped the violence in South Sudan. The conflict there has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands and led to mass starvation and wide displacement.  
  Item Number:9 Date: 03/10/2017 MALAYSIA - POLICE CONFIRM AIRPORT VICTIM'S IDENTITY; RELATIONS WORSEN WITH N. KOREA (MAR 10/CNN)  CABLE NEWS NETWORK -- The chief of the Royal Malaysia Police has confirmed that a North Korean man killed last month in Kuala Lumpur is Kim Jong Nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, reports CNN.   The victim attacked on Feb. 13 was carrying a passport under the name of Kim Chol. He was killed with VX nerve agent at the international airport in the capital, according to Malaysian police.   "We have fulfilled the requirement of the laws on his identification," said Khalid Abu Bakar on Friday. He did not give details on how the body was identified, saying the "safety and security of witnesses" was at stake.   This was the first official police confirmation of the victim's identity. Malaysian Cabinet officials said it was Kim soon after the attack.   The body will now be handed over to the Malaysian Health Ministry because nobody has claimed it, said Bakar.   Malaysian police had previously said it would not release Kim's body to North Korea without DNA from the victim's next of kin.   Meanwhile, diplomatic relations between the two countries have deteriorated badly. Malaysia, which has been one of the few nations friendly with Pyongyang, banned North Koreans from leaving the country, noted NPR earlier this week. Malaysia has directly accused the North of murdering Kim.  
  Item Number:10 Date: 03/10/2017 NETHERLANDS - GOVERNMENT REPORT BLASTS CONDITION OF ARMED FORCES, SAYS THEY ARE 'GRAVELY NEGLECTED' (MAR 10/DUNEWS)  DUTCH NEWS -- An influential government advisory council in the Netherlands says the capability of the military has eroded significantly, reports Dutch News.   The military has been "gravely neglected" under the government of Prime Minister Mark Rutte, said the chairman of the council in a statement released Friday.   The council recommended that the defense budget meet the European average for the next four years and hit the NATO goal of 2 percent in the subsequent four years, reported Reuters.   Even if spending is increased, the military will not be in a state of "basic readiness" until 2021, said the council report.   NATO has been critical of the level of Dutch defense spending. The Netherlands has been spending just over 1 percent of GDP on defense. This compares to the European NATO average of 1.4 percent
Item Number:11 Date: 03/10/2017 NIGERIA - CAMEROONIAN, NIGERIAN FORCES CLEAR BOKO HARAM FROM BORDER AREA (MAR 10/PREM)  PREMIUM TIMES -- The Nigerian military says a joint operation with Cameroonian troops has cleared seven villages of Boko Haram militants along the shared border between the neighbors, reports the Premium Times (Abuja, Nigeria).   The two-day operation, led by the Cameroonian military, cleared the towns of Siyara, Kote, Sigawa, Bulabundibe, Adeleke, Tchatike and Lamukura, said a Nigerian army spokesman.   The mission involved personnel from the Cameroonian rapid intervention battalion and Nigeria's 151 Task Force Battalion, 21 Brigade, the paper reported on Wednesday.   "While conducting the operation, the troops came in contact with Boko Haram terrorists and neutralized many of them, apprehended two others, while many others escaped with gunshot wounds," said the spokesman
Item Number:12 Date: 03/10/2017 RUSSIA - SU-34S, SU-30SMS, YAK-130S AIRCRAFT ON THE WAY THIS YEAR, SAYS DEPUTY DEFENSE MINISTRY (MAR 10/SPUTNIK)  SPUTNIK -- The Kremlin says the Russian air force will take delivery 16 new fighter-bombers in 2017, reports Russia's Sputnik news agency.   Four more Sukhoi Su-34 fighter bombers are expected to be delivered this year on top of a planned 12, said Deputy Defense Minister Yuriy Borisov on Friday.   A long-term contract has been inked with the Novosibirsk Aircraft Production Association (NAPO, or NAPA) for a total of 92 Su-34s. A modernization program for the aircraft is planned to begin in 2018, he said.   Borisov announced on Thursday that the air force would receive 17 Su-30SM fighter jets and 10 Yak-130 combat trainers in 2017
Item Number:13 Date: 03/10/2017 SOMALIA - BOMB EXPLODES UNDER CAR SEAT OF PUNTLAND LAWMAKER, SERIOUSLY INJURING HIM (MAR 10/SHABELLE)  SHABELLE MEDIA NETWORK -- A member of the Parliament of Somalia's breakaway Puntland has been seriously injured by a bomb placed in his car, reports the Shabelle Media Network (Mogadishu).   A bomb was put under the seat of the car belonging to MP Abdulkadir Farah Botan. Officials said the bomb exploded after he left a hotel in the Puntland-administered part of the divided city of Galkayo in northern Somalia.   The lawmaker was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he was reported to be receiving treatment.   No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack. Galkayo has been the site of a number of attacks in recent months
  Item Number:14 Date: 03/10/2017 SOUTH KOREA - WITH MORE CYBERATTACKS EXPECTED, SEOUL RAISES ALERT LEVEL (MAR 10/YON)  YONHAP -- The South Korean government has just increased its alert level against cyberattacks, reports the Yonhap news agency (Seoul).   The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning raised its alert status on Thursday to its second-highest level, out of five levels.   The move anticipates increased cyberattacks from North Korea and others directed at the South's major agencies and businesses, officials said.   Hacking attacks on key government agencies increased recently, said the ministry. The heightened alert level is intended to deter potential provocations
Item Number:15 Date: 03/10/2017 SYRIA - RUSSIAN ENGINEERS ASSISTING SYRIANS IN CLEARING PALMYRA FROM MINES (MAR 10/TASS)  TASS -- Scores of Russian military engineers have arrived in the Syrian city of Palmyra to help with demining, reports Tass (Russia).   Syrian government forces took back the ancient city from the Islamic State earlier this month, the fourth time in the past two years that control of the area and its monuments has changed hands.   A team of 187 sappers has already begun demining work, said a Russian military official on Friday.   The unit is using new robots and specially trained dogs to clear ISIS mine and explosives, he said.   Syrian engineers started demining earlier.   The Syrian army, backed by Russian air support, last seized Palmyra in March 2016 before losing it in December. During that period, Russian engineers cleared 8,500 buildings and defused 18,000 explosives devices, said officials
  Item Number:16 Date: 03/10/2017 SYRIA - SDF EYES LIBERATION OF RAQQA, OPPOSES TURKISH ROLE (MAR 10/REU)  REUTERS -- An alliance of U.S.-backed Syrian militias say it has enough fighters to capture the Islamic State-held city of Raqqa, reports Reuters.   "The number of our forces is now increasing, particularly from among the people of the area, and we have enough strength to liberate Raqqa with support from the coalition forces," said a statement from the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) on Thursday.   The SDF, which includes the Kurdish Peoples' Protection Units (YPG) and Arab groups, recently cut off Raqqa from the ISIS stronghold of Deir Ezzor province.   Their forces should reach the outskirts of Raqqa within a few weeks, said an alliance spokesman.   The SDF opposes any Turkish role in seizing Raqqa. Ankara views the YPG as terrorists, being an offshoot of the banned Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).   Turkey said on Thursday no decision on participation had been made yet, and the U.S.-led coalition has kept the possibility open.  
  Item Number:17 Date: 03/10/2017 TAIWAN - HELICOPTER CARRIER ON NAVY'S WISH LIST (MAR 10/TAINEWS)  TAIWAN NEWS -- The Taiwanese navy is mulling a proposal to build a helicopter carrier, reports Taiwan News.   The service detailed its plans Tuesday as part of an indigenous naval shipbuilding exhibition held on the combat support ship Panshi in Keelung City.   The proposed landing helicopter dock (LHD) would displace 22,000 tons, have a top speed of 30 knots (55 kmh) and measure 722 feet (220 m) long, according to the service's specifications.   The potential vessel would be armed with an Oto Melara 76-mm gun and air defense missile system and equipped with an active electronically scanned array radar and advanced sonar system, as noted in the plans on display.   The flight deck would be able to accommodate at least six large helicopters simultaneously, said the exhibit.   Navy officials said the project's future depends on a government evaluation.   The navy also expects to build new minelayers, frigates, rescue ships, destroyers, minesweepers, submarines, amphibious vessels, transport ships and more Tuo Jiang-class corvettes, according to the exhibit.  
 Item Number:18 Date: 03/10/2017 USA - AIR FORCE ABOUT TO HAVE 1,000 DRONE OPERATOR POSITIONS, MORE THAN ANY OTHER TYPE (MAR 10/MIL)  MILITARY.COM -- An official in the U.S. Air Force says the service currently has more pilot positions for MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) than for any other aircraft type, reports Military.com.   The MQ-1 and MQ-9 family of UAVs is slated to have more than 1,000 pilot operators, according to fiscal 2017 statistics provided to Military.com.   By comparison, the highest numbers in any other aircraft are 889 piloting the C-17 strategic airlifter and 803 flying the F-16 Fighting Falcon, said a spokeswoman for the Air Education and Training Command.   Meanwhile, the Air Force says it plans to bring on more armed UAV operators. To sustain the additional numbers, Air Combat Command expects to set up new operational centers for aircraft such as the MQ-9 as part of an ambitious effort to redefine what a UAV "base should look like," according to service officials.   The Air Force has also begun training enlisted airmen to fly the RQ-4 Global Hawk high-altitude surveillance UAV. The service announced on Wednesday that 30 more enlisted airmen had been selected to fly remotely piloted aircraft
Item Number:19 Date: 03/10/2017 USA - CALLING IT 'PRUDENT PLANNING,' ARMY SCOUTS POTENTIAL BASES IN EUROPE (MAR 10/S&S)  STARS AND STRIPES -- The U.S. Army has been reconsidering its post-Cold War downsizing in Europe, reports the Stars and Stripes.   A team from U.S. Army Europe recently visited two military facilities in northern Germany, which has no U.S. military presence.   "The purpose was to assess the sites if there was growth in permanently assigned U.S. Forces in Germany," said a USAREUR statement. "At this time no decisions have been made; we are engaged in prudent planning only."   The team reportedly visited the towns of Fallingbostel and Bergen, near training ranges and about 100 miles (160 km) from Bremerhaven, which is a key logistics node for the U.S. Army.   The Army is considering stationing as many as 4,000 soldiers in the north, according to German officials.   There are currently only two American brigades based in Europe: the 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Vilseck, Germany, and the 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vicenza, Italy.   Russian aggression in Ukraine has led the Pentagon to reassess its force structure on the continent.   Of late, the Army has been trying to offset its smaller permanent presence with rotational deployments to Europe.  
  Item Number:20 Date: 03/10/2017 USA - MISCONDUCT ALLEGATIONS COST PATROL SQUADRON COMMANDER HIS JOB (MAR 10/NTIMES)  NAVY TIMES -- The U.S. Navy says the commander of a patrol squadron based in Hawaii has been removed from his post over allegations of misconduct, reports the Navy Times.   Cmdr. Ryan Cech was fired on Wednesday by Capt. Robert Patrick, the head of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 10, for a "loss of confidence" in his ability to command, said a Navy release.   The decision "was based on actions that demonstrated poor judgment and lack of professionalism, calling into question Cech's leadership which undermined his credibility to continue to serve effectively in command," the release said.   Cech had been the commander of Patrol Squadron 47, a P-3C Orion unit, which is returning from a deployment to the Western Pacific.   The squadron is in the process of relocating to Whidbey Island, Wash., as it makes the transition to the P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft.

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