Friday, September 30, 2016

Old Tech Is Back!




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Summary

There is no doubt that old tech is back with a vengeance.
Look at the trifecta of blockbuster earnings reports from Microsoft, Amazon, and Alphabet recently, and you can reach no other conclusion.
The Microsoft turnaround in particular has been amazing.
PCs and the software to run them were so 1990s.
After the Dotcom bust in 2000, Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) was dead money for years.
Founder Bill Gates retired in 2008. CEO Steve Ballmer finally got the message in 2013, and retired to pay through the nose, some $2 billion, for the basketball team, the LA Clippers.
Succeeding operating systems offered little that was new, and they fell woefully behind the technology curve.
Even I gave away my own machines years ago to switch to Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) devices. These virus-immune machines are perfect for a small business like mine, as they seamlessly integrate and all talk to each other.
When the company brought out the Windows Phone in 2010, three years after Apple, people in Silicon Valley laughed.
Long given up for dead as a trading and investment vehicle, the shares have been on a tear in 2015.
The stock is hitting a new all time high FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 15 YEARS!
Satya Nadella, who took over management of the company in 2014, clearly had other ideas. The challenge for Nadella from day one was to move boldly into new technologies, while preserving its legacy Windows business lines.
So far, so good.
The key to the company's new found success was it's dumping of its old "Wintel" strategy of yore that focused entirely on the growth of the PC market.
The problem was that the PC market stopped growing, as the world moved onto the Cloud and mobile.
The company is now rivaling Apple with $100 billion in cash, almost all held tax-free overseas.
EPS growth will reach 10% next year, beating other big competitors.
Windows and servers, Microsoft's core products, still account for 80% of the firm's business.
But its cloud presence is being ramped up at a frenetic pace, where the future for the company lies, nearly doubling YOY. Mobile technologies, where it has lagged until now, are also on fire.
Rave reviews from its latest operating system upgrade, Windows 10, also helped.
On top of all of this, Microsoft is paying a generous 3% dividend. Its earnings multiple at 15X makes it a bargain compared to other big tech companies and the rest of the market.
Microsoft makes a perfect investment for a mature bull market.
It is not only at a multiple discount to the rest of the market, now at 18X, it is cheap when compared to the rest of its own sector as well.
This is when investors and traders bail from their high priced stocks to safer, lower multiple companies.
Obviously, I don't want to pile into Microsoft, or any other of the big tech stocks on top of a furious 10% spike. But it is now safely in the "buy on the dip" camp, along with the rest of big tech.
The party has only just stated.
aapl
msft
goog
amzn
Microsoft Logo
Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours.
I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it. I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

September 30th in History (Now with links to other events)

USS Nautilus commissioned 1954


The USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear submarine, is commissioned by the U.S. Navy.
The Nautilus was constructed under the direction of U.S. Navy Captain Hyman G. Rickover, a brilliant Russian-born engineer who joined the U.S. atomic program in 1946. In 1947, he was put in charge of the navy’s nuclear-propulsion program and began work on an atomic submarine. Regarded as a fanatic by his detractors, Rickover succeeded in developing and delivering the world’s first nuclear submarine years ahead of schedule. In 1952, the Nautilus‘ keel was laid by President Harry S. Truman, and on January 21, 1954, first lady Mamie Eisenhower broke a bottle of champagne across its bow as it was launched into the Thames River at Groton, Connecticut. Commissioned on September 30, 1954, it first ran under nuclear power on the morning of January 17, 1955.
Much larger than the diesel-electric submarines that preceded it, the Nautilus stretched 319 feet and displaced 3,180 tons. It could remain submerged for almost unlimited periods because its atomic engine needed no air and only a very small quantity of nuclear fuel. The uranium-powered nuclear reactor produced steam that drove propulsion turbines, allowing the Nautilus to travel underwater at speeds in excess of 20 knots.
In its early years of service, the USS Nautilus broke numerous submarine travel records and in August 1958 accomplished the first voyage under the geographic North Pole. After a career spanning 25 years and almost 500,000 miles steamed, the Nautilus was decommissioned on March 3, 1980. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1982, the world’s first nuclear submarine went on exhibit in 1986 as the Historic Ship Nautilus at the Submarine Force Museum in Groton, Connecticut.


 (More Events on This Day in History)


Hillary Ends September 5 Points Down




Salesforce looks to block Microsoft-LinkedIn deal




Salesforce (NYSE:CRM) is pressing U.S. and European regulators to block Microsoft's $26.2B (NASDAQ:MSFT) acquisition of LinkedIn (NYSE:LNKD), arguing the deal would hurt competition by giving it too much control over the company's vast pool of data.
Salesforce's public broadside against the deal comes three months after it lost a bidding war for the social-network.
LinkedIn claims 450M members in more than 200 countries, including 106M monthly active users.

Think it's Alzheimer's? May be time to think again... (Excerpted From The List 4280)

Thanks to Carl
 Dr. Glenn S. Rothfeld, M.D. 



Being told that you or someone you love has Alzheimer's can be a hopeless feeling. 

You'll hear that it can't be cured... that it's irreversible... and that it's practically a death sentence. 

It's like bad news followed by more bad news. 

But it looks like there may finally be some hope on the horizon for countless people who have been diagnosed with this dreaded disease. 

Because according to a new study, many patients who are told they have Alzheimer's may NOT actually have Alzheimer's at all. 

You see, it's hard to know for sure if you DEFINITELY have Alzheimer's while you're still alive. There's no blood test. If the symptoms seem to fit, doctors can take their best guess -- but the only way they really know is once they can look at your brain during an autopsy.

So, in an attempt to determine how accurate doctors have been, Canadian researchers compared diagnoses and autopsy results for 1,000 patients who'd been told they had Alzheimer's. 

In the end, only 78 percent of them were correctly diagnosed.

And it's not just the false positives, either. It turns out that the signs of Alzheimer's were also missed in some patients -- because another 11 percent actually did have AD, but had never been diagnosed. 

A second study out of the Mayo Clinic supports these results, saying that not only do these misdiagnoses happen more often than you'd expect, they also seem to affect men more than women. 

Kris Kristofferson is living proof of this. As I shared with you earlier this year, the musician and actor lived in the fog of AD meds for YEARS... until he found out he instead had Lyme disease.

Within WEEKS of changing treatments, Kristofferson got his mind back. 

If you've started experiencing those dreaded "senior moments," ask a lot of questions... and get a second or even third opinion. 

Your memory loss might actually be a bacterial infection (like Lyme)... a virus (like herpes simplex 1)... or something truly weird like an overgrowth of yeast! 

You could even be suffering from a metabolic disorder, since blood sugar crashes can damage your brain. That's why Alzheimer's is often nicknamed "Type 3 diabetes."

And none of those issues are cause for being hopeless -- because there are plenty of safe and even natural treatments (or cures!) for each of them.

On a final note, always check the warning labels on any drug you're taking. There's a number of common meds (including stomach acid drugs) that could be responsible for brain fog and other problems that mimic dementia. 

To Your Health, 

Dr. Glenn S. Rothfeld, M.D. 

 

Sources: 
1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed
cbsnews.com

Ann Coulter - September 28, 2016: HOW TO AVOID IMMIGRATION, TERRORISM AND HEALTH CARE FOR 90 MINUTES




Ann Coulter


At least we know Trump wasn’t lying when he said he didn't practice for the debate.

Based on the behavior of trained, professional journalists, I gather I'm not supposed to say what I really thought of the debate, but to cheer like a pom-pom girl for my candidate.

But the truth is, I -- along with my Trump-supporting friends -- thought it was a draw: Trump won the first half, and Hillary won the second half. Since most people stopped paying attention after the first 30 minutes, that's a win for Trump.

Hillary supporters, or "the media," had reason to be happy: She looked healthy! She probably could have kept reciting her snarky little talking points for another hour.

In fact, it was the best I've ever seen Hillary. She avoided that honking thing she does, smiled a lot -- a little too much, actually (maybe ease up on the pep pills next time) -- and, as the entire media has gleefully reported, she managed to "bait" Trump.

Note to the Trump campaign: While it may seem studly that Hillary's best performance versus Trump's worst ends in a draw, on Nov. 9, no one wants to say: We almost won -- and our guy didn't prepare!

The media's excitement over Hillary successfully "baiting" Trump is revealing -- of the media, of what this election is really about, and of what Trump needs to do now.

The definition of Trump "taking the bait" was getting him to talk about himself, not about issues. This from a media that claim to be aching for "policy specifics."

Hillary -- with assists from the moderator -- "baited" Trump on how rich he is, the loan from his father, a lawsuit in 1972, the birther claims, who he said what to about the Iraq War from 2001 to 2003, and so on.

For the media, their gal was winning whenever precious minutes of a 90-minute debate were spent rehashing allegations about Trump. Ha ha! We prevented Trump from talking about issues that matter to the American people! That was scored as a "win."


Nothing illustrates more clearly that this election is about the people versus the elites than the fact that the media run from Trump's issues like Dracula from the sun.

Trump wins whenever he talks about issues; he loses whenever he talks about himself.

Trump was winning when he talked about the heinous trade deals that have shipped jobs abroad and immiserated millions of Americans -- which Hillary supports. He was winning when he talked about bringing order and safety to black neighborhoods overrun with crime; Hillary’s with the criminals. He was winning when he talked about rebuilding our inner cities, instead of saying, "Vote for me!" then, "See you in four years!" -- as Hillary does.

Unlike the media, ordinary people don't care about Trump's taxes or net worth or the things he said as an entertainer. Trump will be dead and gone in 30 years. But whether America continues to exist or becomes some dystopian blend of Guatemala and Afghanistan will be determined by this election.

It's almost impossible not to correct a lie, especially about yourself, which is why Hillary and Lester Holt's "baiting" strategy was to make outrageous claims about Trump.

Hillary, for example, criticized Trump for not releasing his tax returns, saying, "maybe ... he's paid nothing in federal taxes."

This is exactly what Sen. Harry Reid stated as hard fact about Romney in 2012 -- on the Senate floor, so he couldn't be sued. After the election was over, Reid was asked about this obvious falsehood. He laughed it off and said, "Romney didn't win, did he?"

This is the game they play.

Trump has got to learn to ignore it. The voters have. They don't care about his taxes. They want jobs, they want a wall and they'd like fewer Muslims showing up, collecting welfare, then killing Americans.

Trump doesn't have to do formal debate practice, standing at a podium, facing off against a shorty in pantsuit. But he does need Pavlovian training to stop responding to irrelevancies.

This isn't about him! It's about a movement of the people to take back their government from an arrogant plutocracy.

From now until the next debate, every single person who works for Trump should personally insult him several times a day.

Good morning, sir -- your business is a total fraud.

Here are those trade stats you wanted -- oh and you lied about opposing the war in Iraq.

The Cincinnati airport needs a tail number -- why did you "fat-shame" that poor girl?


If he starts to respond, they should say, "No one cares, sir. Tell me how you're going to stop Mexican drugs from pouring across our border."

The proof that voters don't care about the personal attacks on Trump is that, even after his lazy and self-indulgent debate performance, he won nearly every online poll.

Evidently, the American people have sized up the candidates and decided they want Trump. But there's just one last formality: He needs to pass some minimum threshold, a basic job requirement – like proving he has a drivers license.

Everybody agrees he’s got the job. It's too late for Hillary to be sucking up to the hiring committee, reminding them, but I took driver's ed seven times -- yes, there were mistakes, but I was grilled for 11 hours about that vehicular homicide. Also, the Russians hacked my GPS.

Trump showed up at the debate with his driver's license. That's all anyone needed to see.



COPYRIGHT 2016 ANN COULTER
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK
1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Despite internet polls and commentary, Dick Moriris thinks Donald Trump Lost the 1st Debate; Here's why



Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump showed what an amateur he is in his first presidential debate performance Monday night. He stupidly thought a debate was about answering all the questions, rather than using them as excuses to get out his pre-planned sound bites. He lost the debate, but not by so much that he can't come back in the second contest that will take place on Oct. 9th.
Apart from the outcome, the real story of the debate is the shots Trump left on the cutting-room floor. How can you go through a 98-minute debate with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and not mention the following words: "Clinton Library," "Benghazi," "FBI," "pay for play," "IRS scandal" or "speaking fees"? 

Clinton -- minus the corruption, secrecy issues and the constant lying and cover-ups -- should win this election easily. Trump made that clear in the first debate.
When the subject turned to cyber-security, why on earth did Trump not talk about Clinton's private email server and how it compromised America's national security by putting the country's innermost secrets on an insecure server in her basement? Instead, he let her ramble on about the danger of cyber-attacks. Claiming that Russian President Vladimir Putin was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee server, she warned the Russian leader against any more hacking before the election.

And when the host, Jim Holt of NBC News, asked Trump directly what could be done to ward off things like the terrorist bombings in New York, he didn't even mention his proposal to ban immigrants from countries deemed to be state sponsors of terrorism. (The bomber was an immigrant from Afghanistan, one of the countries from which Trump would have barred immigration.)

When Clinton read off a litany of the things Trump has said about women, Trump should have replied that all he did was call people names, but Clinton hired private detectives to dig up dirt on women who had been linked to her husband. (Not to get them to leave her husband alone, or even to get a divorce, but to intimidate them into silence, so he could get elected president by lying about his relationships.)

Trump twisted himself in knots as he tried to make the accurate point that he has opposed the invasion of Iraq, while Clinton backed it. Instead of just pointing out that his comments, which made it sound as though he was open to backing an invasion, were made years before the actual war and that, when the debate got serious and the matter was before the U.S. Senate, he wrote extensively against invading, while Clinton voted to go ahead.

Then, when Clinton implied that Trump would be fast and loose with nuclear weapons and could not be trusted with that power, he didn't come back at her and point out that she backed the war in Iraq, sponsored the war in Libya and advocated for a war in Syria. He should have said that she felt she needed to prove her strength by urging military action.

Trump also was unable to fend off attacks on his failure to release his income tax returns. Instead, he tried to sell the transparent falsehood that he didn't dare release them while he was under an audit from the Internal Revenue Service -- a position Clinton rightly debunked. And he had no answer to charges that he laid off workers, stiffed them of their pay and went into bankruptcy to avoid paying his debts. Trump should have turned to Clinton and said that he was a private businessman, and that sometimes he succeeded and sometimes he failed, while she has lived off the taxpayers for 40 years, never taking chances and never taking risks.
Trump's biggest omission was his failure to challenge his opponent on her health. Apart from questioning her stamina (which Clinton rebutted well), he should have demanded that she take a full MRI exam and release the results to the public. We can handle a disabled president. We had one for 12 years (FDR) and did just fine. But we cannot have a demented one. And, after cranial blood clots and four fainting episodes in the past six years (that we know about), we are entitled to question her health and demand answers. But Trump let that pass him by, too.

So Trump didn't do as well as he could have. Will it cost him the election? No. He can still come back. There are two more debates and if this arrogant know-it-all will only listen to constructive criticism from experts, he might yet be able to confront Clinton and win.

Fw: TheList 4280




The List 4280

To All
I hope your week has been going well.
Regards,
Skip
 
This Day in Naval History September 29
 
1944 - USS Narwhal (SS-167) evacuates 81 Allied prisoners of war that survived sinking of Japanese Shinyo Maru from Sindangan Bay, Mindanao
1946: Lockheed P2V Neptune, Truculent Turtle, departs Perth, Australia on a long distance non-stop, non-refueling flight to the mainland United States that ends on Oct. 1 at Columbus, Ohio. The flight breaks the world record for distance without fueling at 11,235.6 miles over 55 hours and 17 minutes.
1959 - USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) with Helicopter Squadron 6 and other 7th Fleet units begin 6 days of disaster relief to Nagoya, Japan, after Typhoon Vera.
 
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Thanks to Carl
Nutrition & Healing - Dr. Glenn S. Rothfeld, M.D. 
 

Think it's Alzheimer's? May be time to think again... 

Being told that you or someone you love has Alzheimer's can be a hopeless feeling. 

You'll hear that it can't be cured... that it's irreversible... and that it's practically a death sentence. 

It's like bad news followed by more bad news. 

But it looks like there may finally be some hope on the horizon for countless people who have been diagnosed with this dreaded disease. 

Because according to a new study, many patients who are told they have Alzheimer's may NOT actually have Alzheimer's at all. 

You see, it's hard to know for sure if you DEFINITELY have Alzheimer's while you're still alive. There's no blood test. If the symptoms seem to fit, doctors can take their best guess -- but the only way they really know is once they can look at your brain during an autopsy.

So, in an attempt to determine how accurate doctors have been, Canadian researchers compared diagnoses and autopsy results for 1,000 patients who'd been told they had Alzheimer's. 

In the end, only 78 percent of them were correctly diagnosed.

And it's not just the false positives, either. It turns out that the signs of Alzheimer's were also missed in some patients -- because another 11 percent actually did have AD, but had never been diagnosed. 

A second study out of the Mayo Clinic supports these results, saying that not only do these misdiagnoses happen more often than you'd expect, they also seem to affect men more than women. 

Kris Kristofferson is living proof of this. As I shared with you earlier this year, the musician and actor lived in the fog of AD meds for YEARS... until he found out he instead had Lyme disease.

Within WEEKS of changing treatments, Kristofferson got his mind back. 

If you've started experiencing those dreaded "senior moments," ask a lot of questions... and get a second or even third opinion. 

Your memory loss might actually be a bacterial infection (like Lyme)... a virus (like herpes simplex 1)... or something truly weird like an overgrowth of yeast! 

You could even be suffering from a metabolic disorder, since blood sugar crashes can damage your brain. That's why Alzheimer's is often nicknamed "Type 3 diabetes."

And none of those issues are cause for being hopeless -- because there are plenty of safe and even natural treatments (or cures!) for each of them.

On a final note, always check the warning labels on any drug you're taking. There's a number of common meds (including stomach acid drugs) that could be responsible for brain fog and other problems that mimic dementia. 

To Your Health, 

Dr. Glenn S. Rothfeld, M.D. 
 
Sources: 
1 in 5 Alzheimer's cases may be misdiagnosed
cbsnews.com
 
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Thanks to  Mugs
The Most Unlikely Hero — Desmond Doss
This will be a movie worth seeing.

Alexander's Column
The Most Unlikely Hero — Desmond Doss
When ordered to retreat, one man refused. The account of his actions is coming to a theater near you!
By Mark Alexander · September 28, 2016  
"There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism." —Alexander Hamilton (1775)
In early November, many of us will be focused on the second Tuesday, Election Day, and the implications the poll taken that day will have on the future of Liberty. Most notable is the future composition of the Supreme Court, because the winner of this presidential election will likely remake the High Court for the next quarter-century.
But pause with me to read about an event that reflects infinitely more about the essential spirit of America than the contest between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.
On November 4th, there will be a big-screen release starring Andrew Garfield (Amazing Spider-Man) in the lead role. It is an action hero movie, but it will not feature a Marvel Comics character.
"Hacksaw Ridge" is the incredible story of Medal of Honor recipient Desmond Doss, a screen adaptation by Mel Gibson based on a screenplay that had been relegated to "development hell" for 15 years. The film's world premiere was earlier this month at the esteemed Venice Film Festival, where it received a 10-minute standing ovation.
So why does a script sit for 15 years and then receive an overwhelming reception by the industry's leading critics? Because its subject did not have a self-promoting inclination in his body, and the word "hero" is so overused today that its meaning is now a ubiquitous reference to virtually anyone in any uniform.
But this story reaffirms the rightful definition of heroism.
I first met Desmond Doss in 1995 when he was 76 years old. He was a local man whose name wasn't known to many, even in his small community. He and his wife, Frances, were simple people who lived a simple life on a small farm a few miles south of our family home in east Tennessee.
Desmond was humble and slightly built. He wore thick glasses and was virtually deaf. But he and Frances were warm and welcoming people.
So quiet and unassuming were these two souls that one would never suspect they had been more than five miles from their small homestead. But Desmond and Frances both exhibited a deep and unrelenting resolve rooted in their Christian faith, which became evident when in their presence.
Fifty years before we met, Desmond selflessly demonstrated that faithful resolve in repeated acts of heroism unparalleled among Medal of Honor recipients before or since.
Desmond was raised in a Christian tradition which taught that taking up arms to do someone harm was forbidden. When World War II began, he declined a religious exemption that would have allowed him to continue working in a Virginia shipyard. Instead, he became an Army medic. But he told his superior officers that his religious beliefs — his understanding of the Ten Commandments — prohibited him from picking up a weapon to kill someone.
I note that another Medal of Honor recipient, Tennessean Alvin York, held similar faith views. He was a Christian "pacifist." However, in the 1918 battle of Meuse-Argonne, York took up his weapon and masterfully used his backwoods marksmanship to defend men who were pinned down by machine gun fire — and captured 132 Germans in the process. Alvin would later say, "A higher power than man guided and watched over me and told me what to do."
Desmond was classified a "conscientious objector," though he preferred the term "conscientious cooperator" because he never objected to serving our country. According to Desmond: "I felt like it was an honor to serve God and country. I didn't want to be known as a draft dodger, but I sure didn't know what I was getting into."
Doss was viewed by officers and his fellow enlisted personnel as a coward. He never picked up a rifle, though he found himself in the heat of combat in places like Leyte and Guam in the Pacific. But it was his actions in May 1945, near Urasoe on Okinawa, that really distinguish his limitless courage and character.
Amid the most horrific fighting on that bloody island, Desmond refused an order of retreat and cover, because he knew there were many severely wounded soldiers above his position at the top of the Maeda Escarpment — a rocky cliff also known as Hacksaw Ridge. He scaled that high wall and, over the course of 12 hours, repeatedly crossed fields of Japanese machine gun, rifle and mortar fire and, one-by-one, pulled injured soldiers off the battlefield and lowered them 35 feet to safety via an improvised rope litter. When he finally came back down the escarpment, his fatigues were caked with blood.
His Medal of Honor citation reads like fiction. What he did simply doesn't seem possible. But Desmond's heroic actions with the Medical Detachment, 307th Infantry, 77th Infantry Division, between April 29 and May 21, 1945, are well documented:
"He was a company aid man when the 1st Battalion assaulted a jagged escarpment 400 feet high. As our troops gained the summit, a heavy concentration of artillery, mortar and machine gun fire crashed into them, inflicting approximately 75 casualties and driving the others back. Pfc. Doss refused to seek cover and remained in the fire-swept area with the many stricken, carrying all 75 casualties one-by-one to the edge of the escarpment and there lowering them on a rope-supported litter down the face of a cliff to friendly hands."
But his unprecedented heroics did not end there.
"On May 2, he exposed himself to heavy rifle and mortar fire in rescuing a wounded man 200 yards forward of the lines on the same escarpment; and 2 days later he treated 4 men who had been cut down while assaulting a strongly defended cave, advancing through a shower of grenades to within eight yards of enemy forces in a cave's mouth, where he dressed his comrades' wounds before making 4 separate trips under fire to evacuate them to safety.
"On May 5, he unhesitatingly braved enemy shelling and small arms fire to assist an artillery officer. He applied bandages, moved his patient to a spot that offered protection from small arms fire and, while artillery and mortar shells fell close by, painstakingly administered plasma. Later that day, when an American was severely wounded by fire from a cave, Pfc. Doss crawled to him where he had fallen 25 feet from the enemy position, rendered aid, and carried him 100 yards to safety while continually exposed to enemy fire.
"On May 21, in a night attack on high ground near Shuri, he remained in exposed territory while the rest of his company took cover, fearlessly risking the chance that he would be mistaken for an infiltrating Japanese and giving aid to the injured until he was himself seriously wounded in the legs by the explosion of a grenade. Rather than call another aid man from cover, he cared for his own injuries and waited 5 hours before litter bearers reached him and started carrying him to cover. The trio was caught in an enemy tank attack and Pfc. Doss, seeing a more critically wounded man nearby, crawled off the litter; and directed the bearers to give their first attention to the other man.
"Awaiting the litter bearers' return, he was again struck, by a sniper bullet while being carried off the field by a comrade, this time suffering a compound fracture of one arm. With magnificent fortitude he bound a rifle stock to his shattered arm as a splint and then crawled 300 yards over rough terrain to the aid station.
"Through his outstanding bravery and unflinching determination in the face of desperately dangerous conditions Pfc. Doss saved the lives of many soldiers. His name became a symbol throughout the 77th Infantry Division for outstanding gallantry far above and beyond the call of duty."
In awarding Desmond his medal, President Harry Truman referred to him as "the little skinny pharmacist's mate." Indeed, at slightly over 140 pounds, he would have qualified as a welterweight fighter, but he performed feats that, by his account, could only have been achieved by God's intervening hand.
For his part, Desmond said, "I wasn't trying to be a hero, I was thinking about it from this standpoint — in a house on fire and a mother has a child in that house, what prompts her to go in and get that child? Love. I loved my men, and ... I just couldn't give them up."
Years later, I heard a captain in Desmond's unit, one who had relentlessly ridiculed him, recount in tears Doss's actions on Okinawa — tears because he was one of the men Desmond pulled to safety.
Charles Googe, Director of the Medal of Honor Heritage Center in Chattanooga (where Desmond's original Medal of Honor is housed), notes why his actions are unparalleled among Medal recipients: "Often times heroism is measured within a single or split-second act. Desmond Doss performed repeated unimaginable feats of bravery on Leyte and Okinawa. He left Okinawa with a severely fractured arm and 17 pieces of shrapnel embedded in his body."
Googe notes further, "Once back in the States, he devoted much of his life in service to his neighbors and community. Desmond's character was defined not by one single event, but by repeated acts of honorable service to his country throughout his life."
Desmond died in 2006, and indeed, all who knew him remember him for his lifelong repeated acts of service.
In 1992, during one of Ronald Reagan's last public addresses, he offered these words about honoring our legacy of Liberty: "My fondest hope for each one of you is that you will love your country, not for her power or wealth, but for her selflessness and her idealism. May each of you have the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, and the hand to execute works that will make the world a little better for your having been here. May all of you as Americans never forget your heroic origins, never fail to seek divine guidance, and never lose your natural, God-given optimism. And finally, my fellow Americans, may every dawn be a great new beginning for America and every evening bring us closer to that shining city upon a hill."
Those words sum up the life of Desmond Doss.
Hacksaw Ridge is a big screen production that will introduce Millennials to the reality of genuine heroism and American Patriotism.
Pro Deo et Constitutione — Libertas aut Mors
Semper Vigilans Fortis Paratus et Fidelis
 
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Item Number:1 Date: 09/29/2016 BULGARIA - E.U. COMES THROUGH WITH $179 MILLION FOR BORDER SECURITY (SEP 29/EUO)  EU OBSERVER -- The European Commission has approved tens of millions of dollars' worth of emergency funding for Bulgaria, most earmarked for border security and surveillance, reports the E.U. Observer.   On Sept. 15, the Bulgarian Interior Ministry submitted an aid request to the commission for 160 million euros (US$179 million) for several projects.   The following day, the commission announced it would release 108 million euros (US$121 million) for border and migration management. The balance is expected at some point, said Bulgarian officials.   About 80 percent of the funds will go toward border surveillance, border guards and other vehicles and equipment. Around 20 percent will be used to increase reception facilities for migrants and refugees, said a Bulgarian government spokeswoman.   Current migrant arrivals are lower than in 2015, but higher than at the beginning of 2016, the spokeswoman said.   Bulgaria's three reception facilities are all well over capacity and in need of maintenance and repairs, she said.  
  Item Number:2 Date: 09/29/2016 COLOMBIA - REBELS IN ELN NOW SAY THEY WANT TO TALK PEACE (SEP 29/BBC)  BRITISH BROADCASTING CORP. -- The National Liberation Army (ELN), the second-largest rebel group in Colombia after the FARC, says it is ready for official peace talks with the government, reports the BBC.   "We're ready for the public phase to continue what was decided on 30 March and find solutions to difficulties," said the ELN on Twitter on Wednesday.   The day before, President Juan Manuel Santos called on the ELN to free their hostages and restart the negotiation process. The group is believed to be holding at least four hostages.   An agreement about peace talks was announced in March, but negotiations stalled over the group's continued kidnappings and attack on infrastructure, reported Reuters.   The ELN announcement came after the government signed a peace deal to end a half-century conflict with the FARC guerrilla group.  
Item Number:3 Date: 09/29/2016 FINLAND - WITH EYE ON RUSSIA, NORDIC COUNTRIES STEP UP DEFENSE COOPERATION (SEP 29/BLOOMBERG)  BLOOMBERG NEWS -- The five Nordic countries are boosting cooperation and strengthening their military capabilities in response to security issues in the region linked to Russian aggression, reports Bloomberg News.   The leaders of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden met on Tuesday on the Finnish island of Aaland.   Earlier this month, Sweden announced it would permanently station troops on Gotland. The island in the Baltic Sea would be strategically key in any conflict with Russia.   Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Loefven emphasized that the action in Gotland was not related to any specific threat, but rather a response to the deteriorating security situation since Russia annexed Crimea in Ukraine in 2014.   Finland and Sweden, the two non-NATO members in the region, have been strengthening bilateral defense cooperation as well as working more closely with the alliance.   The Nordic countries generally plan to conduct more joint procurement; including a common combat uniform; develop joint military communications; and air surveillance capabilities; and operate aircraft from each other's airfields.  
Item Number:5 Date: 09/29/2016 INDIA - GROUND FORCES, HELICOPTERS CROSS INTO PAKISTANI KASHMIR AGAINST TERRORISTS, SAYS ARMY; ISLAMABAD CONDEMNS CROSS-BORDER FIRING (SEP 29/WSJ)  WALL STREET JOURNAL -- India says it has conducted "surgical strikes" on terrorist bases located within Pakistani territory, reports the Wall Street Journal.   The strikes followed a militant attack on an Indian army installation earlier this month that killed 18 soldiers. India blamed Pakistan for the attack.   Indian forces crossed the Line of Control, the de facto border between India and Pakistan in Kashmir, with ground forces and helicopters to hit the militant camps, said an unnamed senior Indian military officer.   The attacks started late Wednesday night and ended at 4:30 a.m., local time, said sources cited by India's Zee News.   Helicopter-borne paratroopers and special operations forces destroyed around eight militant "launch pads" up to 3 miles across the border, said one officer.   About 38 terrorists and two Pakistani soldiers were believed killed, reported the Economic Times (India).   Pakistan's military denied that there were any such strikes, saying that Indian forces had fired across the Line of Control.   Pakistan condemned India's actions, saying that two Pakistani soldiers were killed.  
Item Number:6 Date: 09/29/2016 ITALY - 4 EUROPEAN NATIONS COMBINE ON LONG-RANGE UAV PROJECT (SEP 29/LEONARDO)  LEONARDO-FINMECCANICA -- Four European countries have recently begun work on a new joint medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), reports Leonardo-Finmeccanica, the Italian defense firm.   The contract for the definition study for the new drone, awarded to Airbus and Dassault Aviation in France and Leonardo-Finmeccanica, was launched with a meeting chaired by the Organization for Joint Armament Cooperation (OCCAR) and attended by the participating countries: France, Germany, Italy and Spain.   The program aims to produce an advanced drone for armed intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance (ISTAR) missions, said the Leonardo release on Sept. 28.   Air traffic integration and certification for the densely populated European environment are also objectives for the project.   With the completion of the definition study, the participants anticipate launching development in 2018, with a prototype to make its first flight in early 2023, according to the release. Initial deliveries of production models are planned for 2025.  
  Item Number:9 Date: 09/29/2016 NIGERIA - SEPARATISTS BLAST ANOTHER OIL PIPELINE IN NIGER DELTA (SEP 29/NEWS24)  NEWS24 -- Separatist militants in Nigeria have claimed responsibility for a second recent attack against oil infrastructure in the Niger Delta region, reports News24 (Nigeria).   The Niger Delta Greenland Justice Mandate (NDGJM) group said in a statement on Thursday that it had bombed the Unenurhie-Evwreni oil pipeline in the Ughelli area.   The line is operated by the Nigerian Petroleum Development Co., a subsidiary of the state-run Nigerian National Petroleum Corp.   Dynamite was used in the attack, said a military source cited by Reuters.   The NDGJM said it was responsible for a similar attack on another pipeline in the area on Sept. 18.  
  Item Number:10 Date: 09/29/2016 PHILIPPINES - PRESIDENT APPEARS TO CALL END TO JOINT EXERCISES, PATROLS WITH U.S.; FOREIGN SECRETARY DISPUTES ACCOUNTS (SEP 29/WSJ)  WALL STREET JOURNAL -- President Rodrigo Duterte says the Philippines' annual joint military exercises with the U.S. scheduled for next month will be the last, reports the Wall Street Journal.   "I am serving notice now to the Americans, this will be the last military exercise," Duterte said on Wednesday during a visit to Vietnam. War games with the U.S. would undermine efforts to improve relations with China, said the president.   Duterte also said he would halt routine joint naval patrols with the U.S. in the South China Sea over concerns such actions might drag the Philippines into conflict with China.   A U.S. State Dept. spokesman cited by Reuters said he was not aware of any official notification about ending joint exercises.   Philippine Foreign Secretary Perfecto Yasay, when asked if Duterte was serious about ending military exercises with the U.S., said the president was misunderstood and his comments had been taken out of context.   Duterte had only ruled out joint patrols beyond the Philippines' territorial waters, said Yasay.   Since he won an election in May, Duterte has had an uneasy relationship with Washington.  
 Item Number:11 Date: 09/29/2016 ROMANIA - PORTUGAL HANDS OVER 1ST 6 F-16 FIGHTERS TO AIR FORCE FROM DEAL IN 2013 (SEP 29/RI)  ROMANIA INSIDER -- The Romanian air force has officially taken delivery of an initial batch of F-16 fighters previously used by the Portuguese air force, reports Romania Insider.   Six F-16s were handed over on Wednesday at the Monte Real airbase in Portugal, according to the Romanian Ministry of Defense.   The jets are scheduled to be flown to Romania on Thursday, where they will be assigned to the 86th Air Base at Borcea, reported IHS Jane's Defence Weekly.   A second batch of six F-16s is scheduled to be delivered by year's end.   The deal for the 12 aircraft was completed in September 2013, with a price tag of US$203 million. Nine of the planes are single-seaters and three are dual-seaters, according to Jane's.   There are also plans to buy another 12 F-16s.   The fighters will replace the Romanian air force's fleet of MiG-21 Lancer jets
Item Number:12 Date: 09/29/2016 SOUTH KOREA - SOLDIER FROM N. KOREA MAKES IT ACROSS DMZ, DEFECTS (SEP 29/YON)  YONHAP -- A North Korean soldier has snuck across the land border to South Korea and defected, reports the Yonhap news agency (Seoul), citing officials in the South.   The soldier crossed the military demarcation line in the middle eastern sector of the Demilitarized Zone Thursday morning, said South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff.   The defector is being questioned about his motives and how he made it over the border, said the JCS.   The DMZ is guarded by armed sentries and has barbed-wire fences and minefields, noted the New York Times. About 30,000 have defected from North Korean since the end of the war in 1953, but crossings across the DMZ are rare.   There was no apparent response from the North, said a ministry official. The South's military has put its forces on high alert against any provocative moves.  
 Item Number:13 Date: 09/29/2016 SUDAN - UP TO 250 CIVILIANS KILLED BY GOVERNMENT CHEMICAL ATTACKS IN DARFUR, ALLEGES REPORT BY AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL (SEP 29/AFP)  AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE -- Sudanese government forces have been using chemical weapons against civilians in the Darfur region, reports Agence France-Presse, citing allegations documented by a human-rights group.   At least 30 such attacks have been made against villages in the Jebel Marra region since the beginning of this year, according to a report published by U.K.-based Amnesty International on Thursday.   The chemical attacks killed 200-250, largely children, said the report.   The AI report also alleges that government forces were responsible for "indiscriminate bombing of civilians... unlawful killing of men, women and children and the abduction and rape of women" in the region.   The alleged government actions were said to be part of a military operation against the rebel Sudan Liberation Army-Abdul Wahid (SLA/AW) group.   The Sudanese military denied the allegations, saying there were no chemical weapons attacks. "The situation on the ground does not need intensive bombing as there is no real presence of rebels anymore," said an army spokesman.   The report was a collaboration with Situ Research and included information from interviews, photographs and satellite imagery, reported the Guardian (U.K
  Item Number:14 Date: 09/29/2016 SWITZERLAND - AIR FORCE HELICOPTER GOES DOWN IN ALPS, KILLING 2 PILOTS (SEP 29/SWISSINFO)  SWISS INFORMATION SERVICE -- Two Swiss air force pilots have been killed in the crash of a helicopter in the central Swiss Alps, reports the Swiss Information Service.   The Super Puma helicopter went down on Wednesday near the Gotthard pass road shortly after taking off from the St. Gotthard Hospice hotel, service officials said.   The aircraft had just dropped off a delegation of French army officers and Swiss officials in the area.   The helicopter only flew for about 66 feet (20 m) before there was a bang and it overturned and crashed, said an eyewitness cited by Swiss Public Television.   A flight assistant was also injured, air force officials said.   The air force grounded its fleet of Puma and Cougar helicopters following the crash
  Item Number:16 Date: 09/29/2016 USA - 'OPTIMIZED' MARINE FORCE WOULD BE LARGER, UP TO 190,000 TROOPS, SAYS ASSESSMENT (SEP 29/MIL)  MILITARY.COM -- The Marine Corps has completed a new force structure assessment indicating an ideal size of the service of about 190,000 personnel, which is more than current plans, reports Military.com.   Marine leaders would like to expand to that number, although the service is currently operating under a "constrained" strategy with the current force of 182,000 Marines.   "The path we're on is to go to 182,000 Marines," Lt. Gen. Robert Walsh, the commander of the Marine Corps Combat Development Command told Military.com in an interview. "That's what we're going to be funded for; that's what we're allowed to do by Congress. But in a perfect world ... we came up with about 190,000; that is the optimized force."   That total is an increase from the last Marine force structure review in 2010, which projected an ideal size of 186,800 personnel. At that time, the service was planning a drawdown from its wartime peak of 202,000 troops.   Budget constraints ultimately forced an end-strength of 182,000, which the Corps is set to reach this year.   The optimized plan with 190,000 personnel calls for a deployment-to-dwell ratio of one month abroad for every three at home, instead of the current one-to-two; increased information warfare capabilities; more intelligence resources; improved precision fire at longer ranges; portable communications technology that can link with new F-35B Lightning II fighters; and improved Marine Expeditionary Force headquarters.  
  Item Number:17 Date: 09/29/2016 USA - DOD PREPARES TO SEND 615 ADDITIONAL TROOPS TO IRAQ (SEP 29/S&S)  STARS AND STRIPES -- U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter has announced that more than 600 American troops are heading to Iraq to assist domestic security forces in the upcoming battle for Mosul in the northern part of the country, reports the Stars and Stripes.   The announcement about the additional 615 troops was made on Wednesday.   The latest forces will be based at the al-Taqqadum air force base. The base used to train Iraqis to recapture Ramadi in the western Anbar province from Islamic State in December 2015.   The move will "increase the final number of American trainers and advisers under the umbrella of the international coalition in Iraq to provide backing for security forces and the Iraqi [heroes] in the fight for the impending liberalization of Mosul," said Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi in a statement.   The plus-up will bring the total authorized U.S. forces in Iraq to more than 5,000 for the first time since the 2011 withdrawal.   That figure does not include military personnel in Iraq on temporary assignments.  
  Item Number:18 Date: 09/29/2016 USA - MEXICO RETURNS REMAINS OF 10 AMERICAN TROOPS KILLED IN 1846 (SEP 29/FN)  FOX NEWS -- About 170 years after their deaths, the bodies of 10 U.S. soldiers killed during the Mexican-American War have been returned home, reports Fox News.   The 1846-1848 war led to Mexico losing about a third of its territory and a huge expansion of the United States -- including much of the present-day states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.   The troops were returned Wednesday to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. They received full military honors and were handed over to forensic anthropologists to determine their identities.   The soldiers are believed to be volunteers who fought during the Battle of Monterrey in Mexico in 1846, under the command of Gen. Zachary Taylor. Of about 6,000 men, 120 were killed and 43 were reported missing.   The remains were discovered by archeologists between 1995 and 2011 during construction in the northern Mexican city of Monterrey, reported the BBC.  
  Item Number:19 Date: 09/29/2016 USA - UPDATED MARINE OPERATING CONCEPT STRESSES MANEUVER WARFARE (SEP 29/USNIN)  USNI NEWS -- The U.S. Marine Corps has released a new operating concept, reports USNI News.   The Marine Corps Operational Concept (MOC) was made public on Wednesday and updates the service's 2014 Expeditionary Force 21 program with a renewed emphasis on maneuver warfare as well as operations in an urban coastal environment against technologically sophisticated enemies.   The MOC acknowledges that the existing force is not organized, trained or equipped to succeed in a future environment with complex terrain and populations, widespread technology, advanced information warfare where there is emphasis on detecting hostile signatures and protecting friendly ones or in the increasingly contested maritime domain.   The document calls for the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) to be optimized to "[execute] maneuver warfare through a combined arms approach that embraces information warfare as indispensable for achieving complementary effects across five domains – air, land, sea, space and cyberspace. The 21st century MAGTF ... blends maneuver warfare and combined arms to generate the combat power needed for simultaneity of action in its full range of missions."   Five critical tasks are identified: 1)Navy and Marine Corps must enhance integration to fight at and from the sea, including finding a role for the MAGTF in the Navy's sea control and power projection missions.   2) The Marines must develop the MAGTF to maintain the potent Marine Expeditionary Force, while also preparing smaller units for success in distributed operations.   3) The Corps must also enhance its network-hardening and signature emissions management capabilities in future information and electromagnetic spectrum environments.   4) The service needs to improve its ability to maneuver large and small forces through all types of terrain and with the logistics capability to sustain them.   Finally, 5) the MOC recommends enhancing the capabilities of individual Marines by recruiting high-quality candidates; investing in training and education; developing quality leaders at all levels; and prioritizing cultural and language skills.  
Item Number:20 Date: 09/29/2016 YEMEN - CENTCOM CONFIRMS RECENT STRIKES; 4 AQAP MEMBERS REPORTED KILLED BY DRONES (SEP 29/AFP)  AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE -- U.S. drone strikes in Yemen have killed four Al-Qaida members over the past week, says the U.S. Central Command, as reported by Agence France-Presse.   An attack on Sept. 20 in Marib province killed two operatives of Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), said a statement from CENTCOM on Wednesday.   Another strike on Sept. 22 killed two in central Baida province.   Both strikes were previously reported by Yemeni security officials, and this is the first time the U.S. confirmed the action.   "These were Al-Qaida operatives who continue to support their organization's destabilizing effects in Yemen. U.S. Central Command continues to protect the U.S., its allies and partners from these threats by denying Yemen as a haven for AQAP," said a spokesman for the command.
 

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