Monday, June 25, 2018

June 25th...This Day in History (Battle of Little Bighorn + others)

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Battle of Little Bighorn 1876


On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana’s Little Bighorn River.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux tribe on the Great Plains, strongly resisted the mid-19th-century efforts of the U.S. government to confine their people to reservations. In 1875, after gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills, the U.S. Army ignored previous treaty agreements and invaded the region. This betrayal led many Sioux and Cheyenne tribesmen to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. By the late spring of 1876, more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp along the Little Bighorn River–which they called the Greasy Grass–in defiance of a U.S. War Department order to return to their reservations or risk being attacked.

In mid-June, three columns of U.S. soldiers lined up against the camp and prepared to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on June 17. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for enemy troops. On the morning of June 25, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead rather than wait for reinforcements.

At mid-day, Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley. Among the Native Americans, word quickly spread of the impending attack. The older Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children, while Crazy Horse set off with a large force to meet the attackers head on. Despite Custer’s desperate attempts to regroup his men, they were quickly overwhelmed. Custer and some 200 men in his battalion were attacked by as many as 3,000 Native Americans; within an hour, Custer and every last one of his soldier were dead.

The Battle of Little Bighorn–also called Custer’s Last Stand–marked the most decisive Native American victory and the worst U.S. Army defeat in the long Plains Indian War. The gruesome fate of Custer and his men outraged many white Americans and confirmed their image of the Indians as wild and bloodthirsty. Meanwhile, the U.S. government increased its efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.
 (More Events on This Day in History)

 

Sunday, June 24, 2018

POISONED? John McAfee the creator of the eponymous computer security software tweeted an alarming picture of himself lying in a hospital bed with an oxygen tube affixed to his mouth.





John McAfee's "enemies" recently tried to poison him, the cybersecurity pioneer claims. However, John McAfee isn't as easy to kill as his myriad "enemies" had hoped. To help drive this point home, the creator of the eponymous computer security software tweeted an alarming picture of himself lying in a hospital bed with an oxygen tube affixed to his mouth.

McAfee

His tweet came accompanied with a warning to the unnamed parties who allegedly carried out the attack: "You will soon understand the true meaning of wrath."
I know exactly who you are." So if you or somebody you know was behind this latest alleged attempt on McAfee's life (he has reportedly been the subject of 11 attempts on his life, along with a "conspiracy" by Belize authorities that he was involved in the death of a neighbor while living in the tropical South American state) be wary: McAfee is coming for you.

McAfee

This isn't the first time McAfee has been in the news this week: the tech entrepreneur tweeted earlier this week that he would no longer be promoting ICOs due to a warning from the SEC, which has lately been cracking down on celebrity endorsements of the often dubious ICOs. But according to RT, McAfee has been promoting Docademic, which is focused on "reshaping the medical world." He credited the company with urging him to seek medical assistance after his latest poisoning. It appears he made a quick recovery, as he followed up news of his poisoning with a tweet announcing his new crypto wallet.
The "doctors said no" when McAfee asked to leave the hospital. But he checked himself out anyway, it appears.
Of course, after spending so much time promoting obviously scammy ICOs, we imagine there's a large pool of people who've bought into these scams who probably don't have the warmest feelings toward McAfee. And let's not forget his promise to "eat his dick" on national television if bitcoin doesn't hit $500,000 by the end of 2020.

BORDER JUMPERS OUT WITH NO 'JUDGE OR COURT'